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Byline: The Register-Guard

FOREST PASS DISCOUNT OFFERED: The Forest Service is offering a $5 discount on 2002 Northwest Forest Passes purchased before Jan. 1. The passes - good through Dec. 31, 2002 - are available for the sale price of $25 at all Forest Service offices in Oregon. The price for those with golden age or golden access passports will be $12.50. While the Northwest Forest Pass is sold at many retail outlets, the discounted price will only be available at Forest Service offices, via a toll-free number (1-800-270-7504) and through the Internet (www.naturenw.org). Willamette Forest Service offices are located in Eugene, Lowell, Westfir, Blue River, McKenzie Bridge, Sweet Home and Detroit. The Northwest Forest Pass allows parking at participating trailheads, rustic camping areas, boat launches, picnic areas and visitor centers in Oregon and Washington national forests and the North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Most of the proceeds are earmarked for maintenance of trails, restrooms and other public facilities.

FOOD BANKS GET SURPLUS SALMON: Reaping the benefits of this year's abundant hatchery salmon runs, the Oregon Food Bank received a truck load of frozen salmon fillets Wednesday for distribution to food-share organizations throughout the state. The 40,000 pounds of fillets were individually packaged and ready to cook. Wednesday's shipment is the first of several that will eventually provide 500,000 meals to needy Oregonians this fall. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife provided the fish to the Oregon Food Bank through American/Canadian Fisheries, which took the fish from state hatcheries, and cleaned and packaged them for cooking. Hatchery-reared coho salmon returned as adults to Oregon hatcheries in great numbers this year, due in large part to good ocean conditions. Even with expanded fishing opportunities that led to more sport harvest, the hatcheries expect to be able to donate 140,000 coho to the Oregon Food Bank. Many of these fish weigh more than 15 pounds.

OLD GROWTH FIELD TRIP OFFERED: Willamette National Forest biologists Saturday will lead a free field trip to an old growth forest near Blue River. Roby Seitz and Pat Boleyn will talk about the ecology of the ancient ecosystem and about the plants and animals that live in it. Participants will meet at the Blue River Ranger District offices in the town of Blue River at 9 a.m. for an introductory slideshow on old growth ecology and mushroom identification. Then they will carpool to the Delta Old Growth Nature Trail for a two- to four-hour field trip. Bring sack lunch, water, rain gear and good hiking boots or sturdy shoes, plus binoculars and field guides if you have them. Details: Ruby Seitz at (541) 822-1203.

BULL TROUT HAVE HORNS, RIGHT? Bull trout were listed as "threatened" under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998 because they are at risk of extinction. That means they must be released unharmed if caught in most Oregon waters. Trouble is, many Oregon anglers haven't a clue what a bull trout looks like (even though one is pictured on page 15 of the Oregon Sportfishing Regulations) and they can easily be confused with a brook trout. To help anglers identify bull trout, the state Fish Restoration and Enhancement Program has provided a $16,510 grant for the production of metal signs that include a color drawing of a bull trout and have explanatory text. These signs will be placed along bull trout streams throughout the state by the start of next year's fishing season.

2002 SPRINGER SEASONS ON AGENDA: The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission will meet in Portland on Friday to discuss how the 2002 Willamette River spring chinook run should be allocated among commercial, sport and tribal fisheries. The commission meets at 8 a.m. at Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife headquarters, 2501 S.W. First Ave. A final decision on the spring salmon and sturgeon seasons will be made by the Columbia River Compact, a multi-state agency that governs fisheries on the Columbia.
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Title Annotation:Recreation
Publication:The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR)
Date:Nov 15, 2001
Words:662
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