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vers libre.

vers libreplural vers libresFrench, free verse

Nineteenth-century poetic innovation that liberated French poetry from its traditional prosodic rules. In vers libre, the basic metrical unit is the phrase rather than a line of a fixed number of syllables, as was traditional in French versification since the Middle Ages. In vers libre, the lengths of lines may vary according to the sense of the poem, the complete sentence replaces the stanza as a unit of meaning, and rhyme is optional.

Vers libre appears to have been the independent invention of several different French poets in the late 1880s. Among its early advocates and theoreticians were Gustave Kahn, Jules Laforgue, Francis Viele-Griffin, and Edouard Dujardin. The widespread adoption of vers libre at the end of the 19th century influenced poetic trends in other countries, so that verse patterned on irregular metrical designs has become common in the modern poetry of all Western nations. See alsofree verse.

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Publication:Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature
Date:Jan 1, 1995
Words:189
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