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manticore.

manticorealso spelledmantichora or manticora or mantiger Greek mantichoaras, martichoras, of Iranian origin; akin to Old Persian martiya-man, person, and to Avestan xvar-eat, devour

A legendary animal having the head of a man often with horns, the body of a lion, and the tail of a dragon or scorpion. The earliest Greek report of the creature is probably a greatly distorted description of the Caspian tiger, a hypothesis that accords well with the presumed source of the Greek word, an Old Iranian compound meaning "man-eater." Medieval writers used the manticore as a symbol of the devil.

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Publication:Merriam Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature
Date:Jan 1, 1995
Words:127
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