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Zinc-L-carnosine prevents chemotherapy side effects.

Thirty-six patients with hematologic cancers who were receiving high-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were treated (apparently without randomization) with zinc-L-carnosine in sodium alginate suspension (active treatment) or azulene gargles (control). Active treatment consisted of 0.5 g of 15% zinc-L-carnosine suspended in 20 ml of 5% sodium alginate solution. One teaspoon (5 ml) of the suspension was rinsed in the mouth for 2 minutes and then swallowed, 4 times per day. Azulene was used as the control agent, since it is approved in Japan for the treatment of oral mucositis, although evidence of its effectiveness is limited. The treatments were continued for 1 month after transplantation. The incidence of moderate-to-severe oral mucositis was significantly lower in the active-treatment group than in the control group (20% vs. 82% for grade 2 or higher; p < 0.01; 0% vs. 45% for grade 3 or higher; p < 0.01). Pain associated with oral mucositis was also significantly less in the active-treatment group than in the control group (p = 0.004).

Comment: L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) occurs naturally in the body. It has multiple biochemical actions, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity and inhibition of protein glycosylation. It has been used successfully in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy and pressure sores (decubitus ulcers). The results of the present study suggest that zinc-L-carnosine can also prevent the development of oral mucositis in patients with hematologic cancers who are receiving high-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. While it is possible that some of the observed benefit been due to the zinc component of zinc-L-carnosine, the study of patients with pressure sores found that L-carnosine was as effective as zinc-L-carnosine for promoting healing.

Hayashi H et al. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis in patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Anticancer Res. 2014;34:7271-7277.

by Alan R. Gaby, MD

drgaby@earthlink.net

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Title Annotation:Literature Review & Commentary
Author:Gaby, Alan R.
Publication:Townsend Letter
Article Type:Report
Date:Aug 1, 2016
Words:317
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