Printer Friendly

ZAMBIA WITHDRAWS SUPPORT FOR RE-OPENING IVORY TRADE

 ZAMBIA WITHDRAWS SUPPORT FOR RE-OPENING IVORY TRADE
 WASHINGTON, Jan. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- The Environmental


Investigation Agency issued the following:
 The government of Zambia this week withdrew its support for other Southern African countries that seek to re-open the international trade in ivory and other elephant parts at the next Conference on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) meeting coming up in Japan in March.
 Citing the lack of available data on its own elephant population, which has reportedly been decimated by poachers, Zambia's Minister of Tourism Lt. Gen. Christon Tembo, announced that Zambia was withdrawing its reservation to the CITES Appendix I listing (threatened by trade) and reconsidering its membership in the proposed Southern African Centre for Ivory Marketing (SACIM), a cartel designed by Zimbabwe and several other African countries to maximize proceeds from ivory sales. The SACIM countries -- which include Malawi, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Botswana -- plan to act as a political bloc at the CITES meeting in order to gain more support for their proposals to place the elephant on Appendix II, which would allow for a resumption of international trade in ivory, hides and meat. South Africa has also submitted a "downlisting proposal" to CITES.
 The Environmental Investigation Agency, which recently conducted an investigation into the illegal ivory trade in Southern Africa, has learned that Zambia's own official proposal to CITES to remove the Appendix I listing, as well as its agreement to participate in SACIM, were drawn up "outside normal channels" with direct involvement by non-Zambians who wish to re-open the international trade.
 Zambia's turnabout comes just after the Chief Executive for National Parks in South Africa, Dr. G.A. "Robbie" Robinson openly broke ranks with his own government on the ivory issue. Robinson, a CITES delegate for South Africa, last month announced that he would oppose his own government's proposal to re-open the ivory trade at CITES.
 Companion resolutions in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives call on the Bush administration to support the continuation of Appendix I for the African elephant. However, the Bush administration announced last week that it will consider supporting the proposals by several Southern African countries to remove their elephant populations from Appendix I, allowing them to market elephant parts internationally. The Appendix I listing was passed at the last CITES meeting in 1989 by over 100 countries, including the majority of African countries.
 -0- 1/14/92
 /CONTACT: Steven Galster or Kathi Austin of the Environmental Investigation Agency, 202-483-6621/ CO: Environemental Investigation Agency ST: District of Columbia IN: SU:


SB-DC -- DC011 -- 9591 01/14/92 13:49 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 14, 1992
Words:429
Previous Article:CPB INC. ANNOUNCES FOURTH QUARTER EARNINGS
Next Article:CANADIAN OCCIDENTAL PETROLEUM LTD. FILES PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS FOR $115 MILLION OFFERING OF DEBENTURES
Topics:


Related Articles
Elements employed to trace smuggled tusks.
AFRICAN WILDLIFE FOUNDATION URGES PRESIDENT BUSH TO 'STAY THE COURSE' FOR THE AFRICAN ELEPHANT
Trade in ivory restarts.
Bankok authorities make ivory haul.
'No' TO EXTENDING THE TRADE IN IVORY.
An ivory cache from Botswana.
Smuggled African ivory bound for Japan seized in Singapore.
Tusk, tusk, tusk. (Africa).
That's just distusking.
Tussle over future of ivory trade: the conference in March in Doha of the UN's Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters