Printer Friendly

YOUR PROBLEMS: Is new love drug one up on Viagra?; LETTER OF THE DAY.

Byline: Miriam Stoppard

DEAR MIRIAM

FOR some time, I've been enjoying using Viagra.

However, I've recently heard that a new tablet called Cialis can be used as an alternative.

Viagra changed my sex life completely and I wondered if you can give me any information on this new product.

Does it have any advantages over Viagra? Is it as good? Would it be worth my changing over?

VCIALIS is a new treatment for male erectile dysfunction (ED) and comes as an almond-shaped yellow tablet.

As with Viagra, Cialis isn't an aphrodisiac, as neither will increase sex drive or desire.

Cialis works by helping the blood vessels in the penis to relax, allowing blood to flow into it causing an erection.

For Cialis and Viagra to be effective, sexual stimulation is still required.

Men who don't have erectile dysfunction shouldn't take Cialis. Both Cialis and Viagra work in the same way and although the drugs haven't been directly compared, both appear to be similar in how effective they are for men with ED.

However, Cialis offers an advantage in that it's been shown to work for up to 24 hours.

That doesn't mean a man has an erection for 24 hours, because Cialis only works when he's sexually stimulated, but the window of opportunity is longer with Cialis than with Viagra, making lovemaking more unhurried and relaxed. Cialis isn't affected by food, so it can be taken with a meal.

In trials, Cialis is effective in about seven or eight out of 10 men and in men with diabetes it's effective in about six to seven out of 10.

Cialis is generally well tolerated and side effects include slight headache and indigestion.

Less common side effects, which are generally mild to moderate in nature, and short-lived, include facial flushing, stuffy nose, muscle aches, dizziness and back ache. The qualifications to take Cialis are the same as Viagra, so if you have heart trouble or take medicines that include nitrates, you may not be able to take it. Ask your doctor.

Cialis is now available on the NHS to certain categories of men, including those with diabetes.

However, Cialis and all other drug treatments for erectile dysfunction are generally available on prescription for one treatment per week.

If you feel you require more tablets you should bring this to the attention of your doctor.

If you don't qualify for Cialis under the NHS, you can ask your doctor for a private prescription, and there may be a charge for the doctor's time and you'll have to pay for the prescription and the drug itself.

No one should take Cialis or Viagra without consulting their doctor first. You can get more information by logging on to www.impotence.org.
COPYRIGHT 2004 MGN LTD
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2004 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Features
Publication:The Mirror (London, England)
Date:Jan 14, 2004
Words:456
Previous Article:YOUR PROBLEMS: TOO LATE TO FEED?
Next Article:YOUR PROBLEMS: HUNG UP OVER WILD NIGHT OF SEX.


Related Articles
VIAGRA TURNED MY HUSBAND, 70 INTO SEX CHEAT; He walks out 'to be stud again'.
Lilly's new love drug: how to market Cialis?
Just Joan: `I think she expects the sex stuff and I'm not sure I can manage'.
FIRST UK VIAGRA DIVORCE; But will it stand up in court?
Dear Fiona.
Better than talking?

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters