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XEROX SCIENTISTS PRODUCE A NEW, SEE-THROUGH MAGNETIC MATERIAL

 XEROX SCIENTISTS PRODUCE A NEW,
 SEE-THROUGH MAGNETIC MATERIAL
 WEBSTER, N.Y., July 9 /PRNewswire/ -- A see-through magnetic material with a broad variety of potential applications has been produced by scientists at Xerox Corporation's (NYSE: XRX) Webster Research Center in this suburb of Rochester.
 The crystaline material is identical chemically to the ferric oxide -- or more properly, gamma ferric oxide -- that has been used for decades as the magnetic coating for audio and video recording tape, according to Dr. Ronald Ziolo, Xerox senior scientist. But the crystals that make up the physical form of the new material are far smaller than the crystals that comprise the conventional magnetic material, he said.
 As described in an article Ziolo and his collaborators contributed to the July 10 issue of "Science" magazine, the gamma ferric oxide, or Fe2O3 crystals, comprising the transparent material range in size between two and 10 nanometers -- about one one-ten-thousandth the diameter of a human hair.
 "Because the Fe2O3 is so small, it loses its usual ferrimagnetic property and becomes superparamagnetic, a state in which the crystals will stick to a magnet but not to each other," explained Ziolo.
 In this new state, the nanocrystals have important potential applications in areas such as color imaging, computer information storage, magnetic fluids and even magnetic refrigeration.
 "The transparency of the new material is an added bonus, not usually found in magnetic material at room temperature," Ziolo noted. "Why the nanocrystals are more transparent than the larger crystals of conventional Fe2O3 is not yet understood, but it appears to relate to the size of the particles."
 Ziolo and his collaborators grew the nanocrystals within clear beads of a resin that is used in ordinary water softeners because of its ion-exchange properties.
 Although some transparent magnetic materials already exist, their magnetic properties are either too weak to be useful, or they only function at temperatures near absolute zero. The new material is a compromise between these extremes.
 Ziolo, who headed the research team, will report on the development at the First International Conference on Nanostructured Materials this September in Cancun, Mexico.
 The Xerox scientists and their collaborators from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., are teaming up with researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md., to explore the applications of the new development.
 -0- 7/10/92
 /CONTACT: Arthur J. Zuckerman of Xerox Corporation, 716-423-4205/
 (XRX) CO: Xerox Corporation ST: New York IN: CPR CHM SU: PDT


BM -- CL017 -- 7951 07/09/92 15:27 EDT
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Date:Jul 9, 1992
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