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XEROX NETS PATENTS FOR BUCKYBALLS IN XEROGRAPHY AND LIQUID INK

 WEBSTER, N.Y., Sept. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX) has received five U.S. patents for buckminsterfullerenes, the recently discovered third form of carbon, in key imaging applications, including inks, toner, developer and photoreceptors.
 "This is a material class with a whole range of physical and chemical phenomena and potential applications that need to be further explored," said Dr. Ronald Ziolo, senior scientist at the Xerox Webster Research Center in suburban Rochester, who led the Xerox effort along with Joe Mort, research fellow. "We are pleased that we were in a position to move quickly and stake a technological position for Xerox."
 Fullerenes, discovered in 1985 and produced in significant quantities for the first time in 1990, represent one of the hottest fields of materials research today, according to the Xerox scientists. All of the top 10 most highly cited original research papers in chemistry for 1992 involve fullerenes, also known as "buckyballs," according to the Materials Research Society, a professional organization based in Pittsburgh.
 Most buckminsterfullerene research to date has focused on the molecule's basic properties and structure, Ziolo said. With its research in xerography and inks, the Xerox Webster Research Center is among the first institutions to report on potential applications for the fullerene material.
 Most of the materials used in xerographic toners and photoreceptors today are carbon based, and fullerenes share some of their properties, Mort said. Like toner particles, for instance, they can be electrically charged through friction (triboelectricity), and they are good insulators.
 The key to most of their potential future applications, however, lies in the ease with which the materials can be chemically modified by attaching other atoms and molecules to the fullerene structure, according to Xerox scientists. Such alterations can permit researchers to fine tune the materials' characteristics to optimize them for particular applications.
 Buckminsterfullerenes are named for architect R. Buckminster Fuller, because the material's molecular shape is similar to the soccer-ball- like geodesic domes for which he was known. The material's properties are distinct from those of the other two forms of carbon: graphite and diamond.
 Other potential applications for buckyballs that are currently being explored are in superconductivity, microelectronics, nonlinear optics, nuclear medicine, super lubrication, fabrication of substances that are as hard as diamonds, and as photovoltaic cells in solar batteries.
 -0- 9/9/93
 /CONTACT: Kerry C. Regan of Xerox, 716-422-4107/
 (XRX)


CO: Xerox Corporation ST: New York IN: CPR CHM SU: PDT

BM -- CL002 -- 0179 09/09/93 09:32 EDT
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Date:Sep 9, 1993
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