Printer Friendly

Wireless network uses radio.

WIRELESS NETWORK USES RADIO

One of ADCU's longtime members, Johnson & Higgins, based in New York, exemplifies how innovation must become a most a daily affair to keep abreast of opportunities in telecommunications.

I recently had a opportunity to meet with Mark Manto, telecomm consultant with the Management Information Systems Department of Johnson & Higgins in Princeton, N.J., and he talked enthusiastically about a local-area wireless network on which they have just completed beta tests.

Johnson & Higgins, established in 1845, is an international insurance brokerage, a reinsurance intermediary, and an employee-benefits consultant with 60 offices in the U.S. They have numerous LANs and always are testing new LAN products and services.

Mark pointed out that a major concern with LANs is the requirement for pre-wiring of all available locations. Consequently, moves and changes can become a problem. With this new local-area wireless network, physical moves and changes are as easy as moving a desk clock and plugging it in.

No cabling is required between personal-computer devices. The cost, time delays, and inconvenience of cabling disappear.

The radio-based resource-sharing system installed at Johnson & Higgins supports a variety of PC devices including IBM PC/XT, IBM PS/2 model 50, Compaq, Zenith PC, Epson LQ1500 matrix printer, and HP LaserJet printers. It runs up to four channels at 9.6 kb/s on a frequency of 902-928 MHz with no FCC license required.

Each radio device can be conservatively 100 feet from any other radio device. This specification applies to environments with internal walls and other obstructions. Line-of-sight distance specifications average 500 feet between radio units.

It has a buffer to retain information and comes with file-transfer capability and even a simple electronic-mail facility.

Each PC device attached to the system "talks" with other radio units. Software must be configured and loaded from a PC to the radio unit, which takes as little as two minutes.

From a user standpoint, Manto continued, their system is transparent to daily PC work. At installation they select an output device or another PC located on the wireless configuration. The communications software is user-friendly and the configuration of the wireless or radio network is menu-driven.

When someone is on the network, the user must read all information on the screen and then input the next command or instruction. This sequence is vital to ensure the network is working effectively and is trouble-free.

Implementation

A problem encountered with the system was a conflict in random access memory. When a user needed to access a program that required a large amount of RAM, the program did not load correctly. This was due to a batch file, created at boot-up, which loaded the radio or wireless network program.

Also, when a user is transferring a file, he must be aware of the file being transferred and the location to which it is being transferred.

Another problem was the radio hardware itself. The module that sits on top of or near the PC or printer has to be reset occasionally, but this is done easily by a reset button on the back of the module.

Overall, Mark feels the system has worked up to specifications and is an acceptable alternative for a location that needs only print-sharing and general file transfers.

Johnson & Higgins has installed eight units. The cost for each is in the several-hundred-dollar range. You can write Mark at Johnson & Higgins, 212 Carnegie Center, Princeton, NJ 08540.

Augie Blegen is a telecomm consultant and executive director of the Association of Data Communications Users (612-881-6803).
COPYRIGHT 1990 Nelson Publishing
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Datacomm User
Author:Blegen, August
Publication:Communications News
Article Type:column
Date:Jan 1, 1990
Words:586
Previous Article:Cable weary.
Next Article:Northern makes big promises.
Topics:


Related Articles
Fourth-Generation Protocol Analyzers Support Data Communications Managers.
DIGITAL EQUIPMENT ORDER.
Publications.
VOICE PORTALS FUEL MOBILE PHONE GROWTH.
KOREA TELECOM ADOPTS SOLIDSTREAMING SOFTWARE FOR VOD.
NDC to provide WLAN Module ODM services.
Wireless could jump-start market recovery: but only if 3G gets its act together.
WIRELESS LAN EQUIPMENT SHIPMENTS TO TRIPLE WITHIN 5 YEARS.
SBC ADDS INTRUSION PREVENTION TO NETWORK SERVICES.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters