Printer Friendly

Where from here?

Plans for the future of the country from YSP, Ansar Allah, the GPC and others The State Building Working Group at the National Dialogue Conference (NDC) recently presented visions for the country from the political groups and parties participating in the conference. (The only major, organized group that did not present its vision was the Southern Movement). The groups' outlines include how political parties envision Yemen's governing system; political plurality; legislative, executive and judicial authorities; relations of authorities within the state; electoral system; quotas; the national division of wealth and other issues. For the first time in the country's history, political parties are presenting clear and transparent visions - allowing citizens and analysts to decide for themselves what they support. The political parties' visions highlight political trends such as an inclination towards a federal parliamentary system that is largely decentralized. It also highlights support for a national mandate that would allow for a 30 percent quota for women in elected positions. Most political parties agree that Sharia'a must be the main--if not the only--source of legislation with respect for international agreements Yemen has ratified in the past. Most parties emphasize the need for a peaceful transition of power, denouncing regime changes through violence or military intervention.

Islah Religion? Islam Shape of state? Decentralized Equal ctizenship? Yemenis are equal in front of the law.

Source of legislation? Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia'a) is the source of all legislation.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority.

Political plurality? Political plurality and a peaceful transition of power.

Central power? According to the constitution - both centralized and decentralized.

Provincial power? Elected administrative authorities. Rashad Party Religion? Islam Equal citizenship? Undefined Source of legislation? Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia'a) is the source of all legislation. This article must not be changed or replaced in any way.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority and directly practice this through elections and referendums and indirectly through the legislative, executive and judicial powers and through elected, local councils.

Political plurality? The political system of the state is based on political plurality aimed at a peaceful transition of power.

Central Power? Undefined Provincial Power? Undefined Ansar Allah Religion? Islam is the religion of people with its multiple sects.

Shape of State? Federal state decided through the National Dialogue Conference.

Equal citizenship? All citizens are indiscriminately equal in rights and responsibilities.

Source of legislation? State authorities must commit to legislation according to the principles of Islam.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority and directly practice this through elections and referendums and indirectly through the legislative, executive and judicial powers and through elected local councils.

Political plurality? The political system of the state is based on political plurality aimed at a peaceful transition of power.

Central power? Decided on by legislative, executive and judicial authorities.

Provincial power? Decided on by legislative, executive and judicial authorities. Nasserite Party Religion? Islam is the religion of state.

Shape of state? First choice: Full local governance as in the Pledge and Accordance Agreement or in the Salvation Manifest (3-7 regions) according to the following conditions: 1) A detailed description of the central state and regional authorities' roles. 2) No amendment to this unless through a national referendum. 3) Parliament is comprised of two chambers - one equally representing regions and one with sovereign authorities relating to the regions. 4) Regions are given maximum authority within the federal state structure. The second option: A federal system with more than two regions (3-5). In both options the cities of Sana'a and Aden have special consideration outside the regional pretext.

Equal citizenship? All citizens are equal in front of the law.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority and directly practice this through elections and referendums and indirectly through the legislative, executive and judicial powers and through elected local councils.

Political plurality? The republic's political system is based on political plurality aimed at a peaceful transition of power through a civil democratic system and free and fair elections. Freedom to form political parties without licensing. However, political parties must not be based on religion, sect, race, or geographic location or have a military element. Political change must not be achieved through violence or armed forces. GPC Religion? Islam Shape of state? A federal state with a democratic, parliamentarian system comprised of a number of regions run by local governments.

Equal citizenship? Undefined Source of legislation? Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia'a) is the main source for legislation.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority and directly practice this through elections and referendums and indirectly through legislative, executive and judicial powers and through elected, local councils.

Political plurality? Political plurality and a peaceful transition of power.

Separation of power? The state's political system is based on a separation between the three powers.

Central power? The federal government is in charge of planning, executing and monitoring the economy, education, defense, security and international affairs.

Provincial power? Every region has its independent entity as a part of the republic of Yemen and has financial and administrative independence based on the constitution and legislative authority. Every region has a local government which runs the region's finances, and administrative and security issues. It has the authority to create measures, rules and procedures serving the general interests. The law decides the extent of central control over the regions. Yemeni Socialist Party Religion? Islam Shape of state? A federal state of two regions or more decided on through a referendum.

Equal citizenship? Yemenis are equal in front of the law regardless of gender, race, origin, color, religious sect, belief, opinion and economic or social status.

Source of Legislation? Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia'a) is the source of all legislation.

Who has authority? The people are the owner and source of authority and directly practice this through elections and referendums and indirectly through legislative, executive and judicial powers and through elected, local councils Political plurality? The Republic of Yemen uses a democratic, parliamentarian system based on decentralization. The political system is based on political plurality aimed at a peaceful transition of power. The state commits to democracy and political plurality and free and fair elections.

Central power? The central state controls the sovereignty of the land and regional waters. It is composed of: 1- A supreme council of the state 2- A national council 3- The President of the republic 4- The government The central state controls international relations, currency, monetary institutions as well as oil, gas and marine investments. It controls public universities, national defense, the armed forces, state security, central taxes and fees, national loans and postal and wireless communication. It manages natural resources, education, public health, standards and measurements, electricity and water.

Provincial powers? Provincial authorities are responsible for their local territories and waters and run all other matters not under the central state's control.

The provincial authorities take over the state's authority at the local level except for what is defined by the constitution.

Copyright Yemen Times. All rights reserved.

Provided by Syndigate.info an Albawaba.com company
COPYRIGHT 2013 Al Bawaba (Middle East) Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2013 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Yemen Times (Sana'a, Yemen)
Date:Jul 11, 2013
Words:1181
Previous Article:Kidnapping on the rise.
Next Article:UNDP to fund 15 youth projects.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters