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When I first started, I'd laugh every time I wrote a rude word; IT SEEMS UK LADIES CAN'T GET ENOUGH OF EROTIC NOVELS AFTER FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, BUT WHO ARE THE WOMEN BEHIND THE SO.CALLED MUMMY PORN?

Byline: Julia Kuttner

I want to be the new Jackie Collins s Victoria Fox, 29, lives with her marketing exec boyfriend George, 32, in Bristol, where she dreams up fantasies of bare-chested men cleaning out her LA mansion pool.

"My older sister gave me a Jackie Collins book when I was 12 and I was hooked. I knew immediately I wanted to write bonkbusters. As a teenager at boarding school, I lead a sheltered existence but it meant I had plenty of time to read and write romances. I loved Jackie Collins' big Hollywood stories and the 80s outfits.

Then at university I started writing a joke bonkbuster for my friends, giving it to them in instalments. After I left, I worked in publishing and after spotting a gap in the market I started writing at weekends. Sending off my first manuscript, I didn't even give the agent my real name in case people found out.

It's a year on from my first book, Hollywood Sinners, being k, published and now everyone knows. I sold 20,000 copies of my second book Temptation Island in six weeks and now I'm writing my third.

My boyfriend's read both my books. It's quite funny to see him tucked up in bed with a bright pink cover, reading intently. I think one of the reason's Fifty Shades has done so well is that it looks like an accountancy manual, not a book with loads of sex in it.

My mum's a retired graphic designer and bonkbusters aren't really her cup of tea - I'm confident she skips the very rude parts. As for my dad, he's a retired architect and not exactly a voracious reader. I m praying he hasn' t got past chapter one of Hollywood Sinners.

A lot of my books are based in California. Besides going there when I was 12, it all comes from my imagination. I've based the characters on people I've met.

I love my job and I've never been one to get embarrassed about sex - it's what we all do and it's fun.

I have five or six words for men's bits and use them more often that you would for women. I much prefer to use words like c**k and d*** than more scientific ones and euphemisms.

I'm sure people must think I sit and write dressed in slinky clothes, but usually I'm in my night or just out of the shower in my old dressing gown with a towel on my head. It's not quite as glamorous as the setting.

The sex comes from my imagination, not from experience. Sometimes when I reread there can be too many nipple mentions, but it all just flows out. People have said some of the positions aren't possible, like when a woman's legs are tangled round a guy's neck, but I'cm sure they must be.

I base my stories on people I know and stories I've heard. While I was writing Hollywood Sinnerso, a friend had embarked on a series of disastrous short-lived relationships and each one carried with it a dreadful sexual episode. She'd text me and say 'eYou can use that'. She had lots oaf sexual misfortunes including someone who kept his coat on thorough out, a parka with a fur hood. I love those details, they are fascinarting. Needless to say, she didn't see him again."

VICTORIA'S LATEST NOVEL, TEMPTATION ISLAND, IS OUT NOW, PUBLISHED BYMIRA, pounds 5.99

We test out different positions fully-dressed

Sarah Masters, 39, has five children aged between nine and 21, as well as a five-year-old grandson. She lives just outside Oxford with her husband Paul, 38, a graphic designer, and spends her weekends in her front room writing lusty tales with just her cats Fifi, Bumble and Stingo for company.

"I've always loved writing and for a long time I did it purely for pleasure. I've worked as a nanny and a chef and while my children were small I was a stay-at-home mum, so there was little time for writing.

But after I divorced my first husband and met Paul, he said: 'Why don't you sit down and write properly?'

At first, I tried my hand at horror as it interested me most. But when I sent my first effort off to a publisher he told me that the genre wasn't a good seller. He said: 'If you want to make money, try erotica'. And to think I blushed at the idea!

To begin with every time I wrote a rude word I laughed, but slowly I got used to it. My first book, Predilection, was published in 2006. Six years on I've had 75 short stories and novels published.

I've worked out a routine that suits me best. During the week, I'm busy with my family. Then at the weekend I sit down and write all the thousands of words I've been storing up in my head all week. It comes out really fast. I can write 10,000 words a day. This year alone I've written 465,000 words, which is around seven erotic novels!

A friend on the school run helps me immensely. We walk and talk, with me narrating in the man's voice and her laughing. It makes exercising more fun, but we do get some funny looks.

I prefer to use various words for the penis in my work. I use 'manhood' only for my historical stories. You have to have variety. If there are too many rude words on the page, I'll stick a rod in there sometimes

I don't like 'purple sword of delight' or anything like that, it just makes everybody laugh. For women, I use the word that rhymes with blunt.

The only people I tell about my work are ones I think are broad-minded enough, otherwise people just look at me strangely.

I'm sure people think my husband and I must be at it every five minutes because of what I do. It's actually very far from the truth. We're usually both too knackered from work. It's more normal to say 'Goodnight dear' to one another and get on with reading a crime book. There are times though when I use Paul to work out different positions to write about. We're usually fully-dressed though and it's funny rather than sexy.

My children know I write romances, but I tell the younger ones they're about 'people who love each other'. That makes the older ones giggle.

SARAH MASTERS IS PUBLISHED BY TOTAL-E- BOUND

We often discuss erotic fiction at breakfast time

Claire Siemaszkiewicz, 41, and husband Marek, 39, live in Lincoln and run Total-E-Bound, the online erotic romance publishers, whose latest Clandestine Classics series inserts wild sex romps into novels such as Jane Eyre and Pride and Prejudice. The couple have a 13-year-old daughter.

"People presume my husband and I must be at it like rabbits. Are we? The chance would be a fine thing - we're too busy.

It's totally normal for us to discuss erotic romance over breakfast and to make sure our authors don't go over the top. We have a style guide listing the sexual euphemisms that we allow - we're not into the old purple prose. We don't have 'opening flowers', we're more graphic. We have at least 20 words for penis in the guide.

When it came to the Clandestine Classics series we had historical experts on hand to help get the language right.

It seemed like an obvious step to spice these books up. We've added additional scenes to enhance sexual tension - it's explosive.

People have said we're jumping on the bandwagon of Fifty Shades of Grey, but we've been doing this for five years. I didn't even finish reading that book - I just didn't think the woman Anastasia was a very strong character.

When I was at school I didn't have a clue what I would do, but I certainly didn't expect to be publishing erotic fiction.

I was married at 18 and followed my then husband with his career in the forces. I didn't start my own career until we split up in my 20s and I moved to London and met Marek.

I worked in sales and marketing. The idea for the business happened when I became sick of working for other people. I was a fan of romances and was reading books online, but I felt there weren't enough out there. I just felt e-books were the future of publishing and erotic romance was a niche market that wasn't being explored.

Still, it was a big jump to move into publishing and Marek and I risked everything to set up Total-E-Bound.

We gambled everything on it, working 16-hour days for the first two years. The banks wouldn't lend us money - they just thought it was porn and couldn't see beyond the word erotic. We were absolutely broke, but now we're an international business.

While our daughter is very proud of us, she's not very interested in what we do. Like most teenagers she'd rather be on Facebook or her iPhone than talking to us about work. We just make sure she doesn't hear about anything too rude."

FOR DETAILS ON CLANDESTINE CLASSICS, VISIT WWW.TOTAL-E-BOUND.COM

CAPTION(S):

SUPPORTIVE: Victoria's boyfriend reads her novels PROUD: Claire and Marek risked it all for their business FAMILY: Sarah with son Charlie and husband Paul
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:The Mirror (London, England)
Date:Aug 15, 2012
Words:1563
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