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What a strange country.

A book titled What is a Canadian? (ISBN: 0771083211) was published in 2006. Many prominent Canadians were asked for their answers:

"A Canadian is ... someone who crosses the road to get to the middle."

Columnist Allan Fotheringham.

"A Canadian is ... an imaginary creature with various mythological traits, some of them charming, some irritating, many of them contradictory."

Philosopher Mark Kingwell.

"A Canadian is part of a jigsaw puzzle, always trying to find that one missing piece that has fallen behind the wainscoting."

Author, Aritha Van Herk.

"A Canadian is ... someone who lives in a nation on trial."

Politician Audrey McLaughlin.

"A Canadian is ... at the outset a Quebecois, a habitant who lives in the St. Lawrence Valley and speaks French. It's worth recalling that the name meant that, and only that, during most of the country's history."

Lawyer Christian Dufour
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Title Annotation:CITIZENSHIP--INTRODUCTION; Canadian
Publication:Canada and the World Backgrounder
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:1CANA
Date:Dec 1, 2006
Words:140
Previous Article:Uh oh! "... this House recognizes that the Quebecois form a nation within a united Canada.".
Next Article:Group identity: unless you are born in Canada, becoming a Canadian citizen is a long and involved process.
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