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Watching mines in eastern Europe.

In January 2000, cyanide from a Romanian gold mine spilled into the Tisza River, killing nearly all the aquatic life and fouling the drinking water of millions of people. To help avoid such incidents in the future, government officials from a dozen southeastern European countries came together in May 2005 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and signed on to a new strategy calling for detailed site assessments for mines of concern, higher health and environmental standards for new mines, and plans for their eventual closure. The agreement also calls for early warning systems to warn countries downstream of mining-related pollution incidents. More than 150 mining operations exist in the area; more than a third have been labeled by the UN Environment Programme as posing a serious risk to human health, the environment, and regional stability.
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Title Annotation:The Beat
Author:Dooley, Erin E.
Publication:Environmental Health Perspectives
Date:Sep 1, 2005
Words:133
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