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GOT A CARD?: Putting a new spin on a centuries-old product, Los Angeles-based E-Card International is marketing what it claims is the first-ever e-mail address card. Used like a business card, the e-card includes only a person's e-mail address, and optionally, their name. but company name, addresses and telephone numbers are intentionally not printed on the card. The purpose of the E-Card, its creators say, is to give people the option of limiting how much personal information they divulge to new contacts. A woman, for example, may be hesitant to give a man she has just met her business card - with all her pertinent data on it. In that situation, an E-card could come in handy.

MUSIC MACHINE: For music hobbyists and would-be recording stars, Los Angeles-based Fostex Corporation of America has released a universal compact disc recorder that can take input from cassettes, hard disks, minidiscs and digital audio tape, and turn it into genuine, playable compact discs. The Fostex CR2000 will set you back $2,200. But think of the money to be made turning your friends' garage recordings into digital albums.

COMPUTER SECURITY: When two computers were stolen from Darim Vision Inc., a Los Angeles-based video hardware developer, the firm came up with its own in-house solution: Turn other computers in the office into video surveillance systems. Darim Vision has now begun marketing the software as PC Snoop, a $99 package that lets your Windows 95 or Windows NT machine operate as a security system. You'll need a small computer video camera for it to work (they retail for about $100) but with that in place, and PC Snoop installed, your computer can detect motion around it, capture digital images of anyone fiddling with your machine and ring out an alarm (the default is a dog barking) to scare the miscreant off. PC Snoop requires a 75 MHz Pentium or better, and 16 MB of RAM to operate.

PARENTS SPEAK OUT: The responsibility of supervising children's use of home entertainment and information overwhelmingly rests with the parents, according to a poll of Southern California moms and dads released last week. Eighty-eight percent of the respondents readily accept the responsibility, but they said they need tools such as rating systems for television and other home media to help them perform their function. In fact, 71 percent of those surveyed believe a television rating system and a similar system for other home media, such as the Internet, is necessary to assist them in selecting information and entertainment for their children. The findings were part of the Hitachi California Issues Poll of 502 Southern California parents, conducted as part of the 1997 California Public Affairs Forum, titled, ``New Media & the Family.''
COPYRIGHT 1997 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1997, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:BUSINESS
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Oct 5, 1997
Words:451
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