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WHO launches "World Cancer Report 2014".

LYON (CyHAN)- The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, is on Monday (3 Feb) launching the World Cancer Report 2014, a collaboration of over 250 leading scientists from more than 40 countries, describing multiple aspects of cancer research and control.

Based on the latest statistics on trends in cancer incidence and mortality worldwide, this new book reveals how the cancer burden is growing at an alarming pace and emphasizes the need for urgent implementation of efficient prevention strategies to curb the disease.

"The current incidence of new cases of cancer each year worldwide is about 14 million but just in the next 12-13 years so by 2025 this will be over 20 million new cases per year worldwide." said Dr. Christopher Wild, Director of IARC

Over the same period, cancer deaths are predicted to rise from an estimated 8.2 million annually to 13 million per year. Globally, in 2012 the most common cancers diagnosed were those of the lung (1.8 million cases, 13.0 percent of the total), breast (1.7 million, 11.9 percent), and large bowel (1.4 million, 9.7 percent).

The most common causes of cancer death were cancers of the lung (1.6 million, 19.4 percent of the total), liver (0.8 million, 9.1 percent), and stomach (0.7 million,

8.8 percent).

As a consequence of growing and ageing populations, developing countries are disproportionately affected by the increasing numbers of cancers. More than 60 percent of the world's total cases occur in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America, and these regions account for about 70 percent of the world's cancer deaths, a situation that is made worse by the lack of early detection and access to treatment.

One of the key messages of the Report is that huge numbers of cancers cases can be prevented and avoided.

"What we're reporting in this World Cancer Report is that the big difference with this report compared to the previous one six years ago is, first of all, that we're seeing a very rapid increase in the numbers of cancers worldwide but particularly in the low and middle income countries so this shows us that cancer is truly global problem and that we're not going to be able to address this problem by simply improving the treatment of the disease. The second big change I think is the advance we have seeing in the understanding of the biology of cancer and now our challenge is to translate this new knowledge about the biology into better treatments but also into ways to prevent the disease and detect it early." Dr. Christopher Wild added

The CyberKnife robot represents the highest available technology for precise radiotherapies protecting as much as possible healthy cells around a tumour.

With this robot, all rays required for a treatment can be applied from all possible angles around the targeted cells in a body. Using so many angles allows that other cells are crossed only once during a treatment session.

The Centre Leon Berard actively participates in prevention promotion also in order to avoid cancers relapses after a treatment. Patients may come in this information office to receive advice and documentation. Physical activities are also proposed to patients by this hospital.

SHOTLIST:

27, 28 JANUARY 2014, LYON, FRANCE

Source: Unifeed

IARC Building

Cancer patient undergoing radiotherapy therapy with CyberKnife robot

Various shots, medical staff checking monitors

Various shots, scientists at the IARC laboratories

Cancer patient undergoing

Cancer patient undergoing radiotherapy therapy with CyberKnife robot

Rodriguez seen on a monitor undergoing treatment

Various shots, interactive mapping tools at IARC to help scientists in their global analysis

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Christopher Wild, Director of IARC:

"The current incidence of new cases of cancer each year worldwide is about 14 million but just in the next 12-13 years so by 2025 this will be over 20 million new cases per year worldwide."

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Christopher Wild, Director of IARC:

"What we're reporting in this World Cancer Report is that the big difference with this report compared to the previous one six years ago is, first of all, that we're seeing a very rapid increase in the numbers of cancers worldwide but particularly in the low and middle income countries so this shows us that cancer is truly global problem and that we're not going to be able to address this problem by simply improving the treatment of the disease. The second big change I think is the advance we have seeing in the understanding of the biology of cancer and now our challenge is to translate this new knowledge about the biology into better treatments but also into ways to prevent the disease and detect it early."

SOUNDBITE (French) Rodriguez, patient in Leon Berard Hospital:

"Over the past 22 years, because it's not my first cancer, I've observed a huge evolution in technologies of treatments."

SOUNDBITE (French) Rodriguez, patient in Leon Berard Hospital:

"I practice sports a lot and this helped me to recover very rapidly with an adapted diet, that's all."

DURATION:02:29

CyHAN

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Publication:Cihan News Agency (CNA)
Article Type:Report
Date:Feb 4, 2014
Words:870
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