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WHAT AMERICANS DON'T KNOW ABOUT CHOLESTEROL COULD HURT THEM

 WHAT AMERICANS DON'T KNOW ABOUT CHOLESTEROL COULD HURT THEM
 CHASKA, Minn., Sept. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- High blood pressure and high cholesterol affect as many as one in nine adults. Yet, according to a recent Gallop Poll, 66 percent of Americans surveyed don't know their cholesterol level.
 The phrases "low cholesterol" or "no cholesterol" frequently show up in newspapers, advertisements and on food labels at local grocery stores. But, despite on-going awareness campaigns, many Americans don't understand what cholesterol is or how to prevent it from causing health- related problems.
 "During September, which is National Cholesterol Education and Awareness Month, we're reminding people to check their cholesterol levels, eat sensibly and exercise regularly," said Jeff Zwiefel, M.S. director of The National Exercise for Life Institute. "Regular exercise significantly reduces total blood cholesterol, a leading cause of heart disease, and the nation's number one killer," he explained.
 The correlation between exercise and lowered cholesterol has to do with the body's lipoprotein ratio. The liver produces lipoproteins to house fats which fuel our bodies' energy needs. When the liver receives a call for energy, it dispatches lipoproteins via the bloodstream to special receptor sites which convert the fat to fuel. Cholesterol, an essential building block for body cells, rides piggyback on lipoprotein. Some lipoprotein carry "good" or high-density cholesterol, and others carry "bad" or low-density cholesterol.
 "Low-density lipoproteins, LDL, are primary carries of cholesterol and the main culprit behind inner-artery plaque build-up which can lead to heart attacks," Zwiefel said. "High-density lipoproteins, or HDL, are the "good guys." They cleanse the bloodstream of excess cholesterol, preventing the accumulation of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries," he added.
 A healthy lipoprotein ratio is higher in HDL cholesterol than LDL cholesterol -- and that's where aerobic exercise plays an important role.
 "Aerobic exercise causes an enzyme activity which circulates HDL in the body longer. This activity, in turn, allows working muscles to use more fatty acids for fuel," Zwiefel said. "Exercise increases protective HDL cholesterol and lowers damaging LDL cholesterol and helps people lose weight which also dramatically lowers cholesterol," he added.
 Exercising on the NordicTrack cross-country ski exercise(R) helps Robert Westfall of Acworth, Ga., keep his cholesterol in check. "My doctor told me my body naturally produced too much cholesterol," Westfall said. "Without a lifestyle change, I was a prime candidate for heart disease." By following a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and exercising every day for 20 minutes on his NordicTrack, Westfall has been able to maintain a healthy cholesterol ratio. "My LDL count has dropped 19 points and my HDL has risen seven points since I started eating right and exercising on my NordicTrack," he said. "Not only do I feel better, I look better too!"
 In his book, "Controlling Cholesterol," leading health expert Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., promotes exercise as one way to control high cholesterol. "Generally, I recommend that those who are interested primarily in overall fitness -- and maximum increase in their HDL levels -- exercise aerobically 20 to 30 minutes a day, a minimum of three to four days a week," Cooper explained.
 The NordicTrack cross-country ski exerciser simulates what experts say is the most efficient form of aerobic exercise -- cross-country skiing. "Twenty minutes, three times a week on the NordicTrack is all that's needed to produce positive changes in HDL cholesterol levels," Zweifel said. "If more exercise is desired, the fluid, jarless motion of the NordicTrack will protect against knee, ankle and back injuries commonly associated with running and other high-impact exercises."
 The NordicTrack works both the upper and lower body, and features adjustable resistance settings that allow exercisers to tailor their workouts according to fitness needs. The NordicTrack line includes seven in-home models, ranging from $299.95 to $1,299.95. Each model carries a two-year limited warranty and 30-day trial period.
 NordicTrack, a CML company, also sells the NordicFlex Gold strength trainer, the new Aerobic Cross Trainer(TM) and NordicTrack's Walking Sticks through direct marketing and a toll-free number, 1-800-328-5888, extension 635.
 -0- 9/9/92
 /CONTACT: Marie Mills, 612-368-2514 or Sara Stenson, 612-368-2416, both of NordicTrack/ CO: NordicTrack; CML ST: Minnesota IN: LEI HEA SU:


DS -- MN004 -- 7478 09/09/92 11:47 EDT
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Date:Sep 9, 1992
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