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WESTINGHOUSE WINS; PHILIPPINE BRIBE ALLEGATIONS REJECTED

 NEWARK, N.J., May 18 /PRNewswire/ -- A jury in U.S. Court today cleared Westinghouse Electric Corporation (NYSE: WX) of charges by the Republic of the Philippines that Westinghouse had bribed the late Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos to win the 1976 contract to build a nuclear power plant.
 Today's verdict is consistent with earlier findings by the U.S. Department of Justice, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and an International Court of Arbitration. All investigations have found no wrongdoing by Westinghouse in the payment of commissions to two companies retained as special sales representatives to help Westinghouse present proposals to former Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos.
 "Clearly, we are very pleased that an impartial jury has reaffirmed Westinghouse's innocence and the integrity of our business practices," said Louis J. Briskman, Westinghouse senior vice president and general counsel. "We were confident that would be the finding after all the evidence was considered.
 "In a trial that lasted nine weeks and involved more than 40 witnesses and 600 documents, the Philippines presented absolutely no evidence that President Marcos received a penny of Westinghouse's commissions. The reason is simple: no money was paid to President Marcos. "I hope we can now put this unfortunate situation behind us. This issue is almost 20 years old, and it has been reviewed over and over again since the mid-1970s. Once again, we've been exonerated." Westinghouse presented testimony that the U.S. Embassy encouraged the hiring of a special sales representative, and when informed of such details as the specific representative Westinghouse planned to hire, the embassy advised that it supported those plans.
 Westinghouse presented testimony that the use of special sales representatives is not unusual in international projects, and that commissions paid to the sales representative were in line with guidelines established by the EXIM Bank. Testimony also showed that several witnesses for the Philippines had been coerced or paid large sums of money for their cooperation with the Philippines government in the trial.
 Nathaniel D. Woodson, vice president and general manager for Westinghouse energy systems, said: "We hope that now, after a jury has heard the evidence and rendered its verdict, we can turn our attention to the future and the power needs of the Philippine people.
 More than 12,000 Filipinos helped build this plant, and now they and their fellow citizens desperately need the 600 megawatts of power it can produce. The safety of the plant and high quality of its construction have been affirmed by international experts selected by the Philippines themselves. The plant is a valuable asset, and it should be operated."
 /delval/
 -0- 5/18/93
 /CONTACT: Bob Henderson, 201-642-3365, or 201-642-3467; or Mimi Limbach, 412-642-3341, both of Westinghouse Electric/
 (WX)


CO: Westinghouse Electric Corporation ST: Pennsylvania IN: ARO CPR SU:

CD -- PG007 -- 9784 05/18/93 12:42 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 18, 1993
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