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WESTINGHOUSE HANFORD EMPLOYEES HEAR CLIMATE SURVEY RESULTS

 WESTINGHOUSE HANFORD EMPLOYEES HEAR CLIMATE SURVEY RESULTS
 RICHLAND, Wash., Jan. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- The following was released today by Westinghouse Hanford Co.:
 Westinghouse Hanford Co. employees say they are generally satisfied with their jobs and their supervisors but less satisfied with communication from management about the role employees have in the new environmental mission at Hanford.
 Those are examples of preliminary results from a company-wide employee climate survey that Westinghouse Hanford president Tom Anderson shared with employees during three meetings today. A final report is expected in a few months.
 "I am encouraged by some of the results, but concerned about others," Anderson said. "The survey will help employees and managers alike understand who we are and what we are all about. It will help Westinghouse continue to make workplace improvements and provide a baseline from which improvements can be measured in the future."
 Anderson said he was pleased that most employees feel they have a good relationship with their immediate supervisors who encourage them to voice their concerns. There is "a clear sense," he said, that employees feel a strong responsibility to make quality and safety issues known. "Nearly 70 percent of the survey responses show that employees are aware they have an obligation to raise questions or point out problems that affect safety or the quality of work," said Anderson.
 The employee climate survey was undertaken to better understand workplace issues. It was conducted by the Human Affairs Research Center of Battelle Memorial Institute in Seattle. Fifty-eight percent of the 9,500 Westinghouse Hanford Co. employees responded to the survey. The 142-question survey was administered to all employees during September of last year.
 Westinghouse has been working hard to resolve workplace and communications problems that have evolved from decades of secrecy, dramatic mission changes and frequent changes in government administration and contractor management. The survey provided a much- needed measure of workplace perceptions, attitudes and conditions within the company.
 The preliminary data identified the company's strengths and areas where improvement can be achieved. Some of the data also verifies what Westinghouse management has been hearing through other forms of employee feedback, including workplace meetings and weekly visits to some part of the site by Anderson himself.
 "I recognize that in releasing these survey results we risk having our weaknesses blown out of proportion," Anderson said. "That's a risk we will have to take. We have said we are going to be more open, and we are. People who are fair will understand that the survey points up strengths as well as weaknesses. We need to know those results so that we can get on with building on the good things as well as focusing additional attention on those which need improvement."
 Anderson asked all managers and employees to discuss together the data in-depth and decide the actions that will be needed to address the issues specific to each work area. "This is our survey collectively," said Anderson. "I do not intend to tell you how we are going to address the problems. I need your participation. We need to decide together where we go from here.
 "Think of the survey as you would a general checkup by your doctor," Anderson told employees. "We want a baseline of our present health which we can then use for evaluating whether we are getting healthier in the future."
 Anderson said he is concerned that 20 percent of Westinghouse Hanford employees responding to the survey still feel intimidated and reluctant to bring up issues. "No one should be afraid to speak up when they see something wrong or unsafe," he told the employees. "All the progress we've made in the last year improving our open communications, including this survey, should support how important it is to have openness and trust.
 "Last year steps were taken to make it easier for employees to bring up workplace concerns. Our managers received training to help them handle employee situations more sensitively. Programs such as Clean Sweep and the Employee Concerns Program have provided options by which employees can raise their concerns. But, it is also clear that we need more work in this area."
 He said he is also concerned that survey data indicated many employees speak negatively about the company. But, Anderson added, "It comes back to building a climate of trust, openness and dialogue. Trust is a tenuous thing. It can't be bought or sold, and I can't give it to you. It's a two-way street, and it's earned on both sides.
 "If each of us just figures out one way to do better, treat our co-workers better or improve our relationships with our supervisors or managers, the survey will be well-served."
 Anderson said he was encouraged by the employee responses indicating they felt Westinghouse was making progress on the new environmental mission and that employees felt fulfillment of the Tri- Party Agreement was important.
 In addition to the all-employee meetings, a full rollout of the preliminary data was published today in a special issue of "The Reach," a weekly newspaper for Westinghouse Hanford employees. Additional articles pertaining to the climate survey will appear in "The Reach" during the next several weeks.
 In the survey, Westinghouse employees were asked their views on their jobs, their company and its mission. The responses indicated that employees generally enjoy their jobs and that "overall this is a good place to work." They also feel valued and are recognized for good work by their supervisors. The data indicated employees feel they are encouraged and provided the opportunity to generate new ideas and solve work problems. Seventy-two percent of the employees who returned surveys said they plan to be working at Hanford five years from now.
 However, employees indicated by the survey that they haven't been given a clear message on how to accomplish Hanford's environmental mission or how they will be trained for their role in it. They indicated, too, that current training for job performance and safety- related matters is adequate.
 Teamwork received a mixed report card. Within work groups employees gave good marks to teamwork but indicated they are not confident that they always receive cooperation from other work groups.
 Attitudes toward Westinghouse management also were mixed. While employees indicated satisfaction with their immediate supervisors and managers, there was less satisfaction with managers further distant from their immediate work groups. Employees also said managers often fail in downward communication and that there are too many programs and campaigns initiated by management without commitment and support.
 Westinghouse Hanford Co. is the management and operating contractor for the environmental remediation and restoration of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in southeastern Washington state.
 -0- 1/16/92
 /CONTACT: Craig Kuhlman of Westinghouse Hanford, 509-376-6826/ CO: Westinghouse Hanford ST: Washington IN: OIL SU:


SC-RR -- SE012 -- 0737 01/16/92 17:09 EST
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