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WENDY'S FOUNDER OFFERS TIPS FOR TEEN JOB-SEEKERS

 Quick Service Restaurant Jobs Offer Career-Building Opportunities
 DUBLIN, Ohio, April 9 /PRNewswire/ -- He's the founder of a $3.6 billion quick service restaurant chain. His company employs more than 130,000 people worldwide. He has personally hired and supervised thousands of employees during his business career.
 And he was fired from his first two jobs.
 "I didn't understand what work really meant," says Dave Thomas, founder of Wendy's Old Fashioned Hamburgers restaurants. "I figured I didn't have to work that hard -- it was just a part-time job. I wasn't going anywhere until I changed my outlook."
 Thomas learned from his mistakes, and his experiences taught him how to get and hold a job. He learned lessons that he now shares with young people around the country.
 This time of year, teens are hitting the streets looking for part- time and summer jobs. Many of the jobs available this summer are in the quick service restaurant industry. At Wendy's restaurants nationwide for example, plans for new store openings coupled with increased staffing during the summer months will result in more than 20,000 new job opportunities.
 "Restaurant industry jobs have gotten a bum rap as boring or dead- end," says Thomas. "I started out sweeping floors and working behind the grill, and so did many people who are now Wendy's top restaurant managers, franchise owners, and executives. In fact, the best place to start is at the bottom, where you learn the basics of how a business works."
 There is nothing embarrassing about entry-level jobs, says Thomas. Thomas believes you have to first learn to take orders before you can give them. Part-time jobs give you the chance to meet people who can teach you important lessons about life and work. You learn skills you'll need the rest of your life.
 These jobs often present your first chance to learn how to work with others and to take direction from people other than teachers or parents. Doing a simple task well shows an employer you're ready for more responsibility.
 With more than 3.5 million young people looking for jobs this summer, competition for entry-level positions means that not every teen who's looking for a job will find one. The teen job-seeker who knows what an employer looks for has a better chance of landing a job.
 In the recently published autobiography, "Dave's Way," Thomas offers a few tips that may give teen job hunters an advantage over the competition:
 -- Be Early -- you look really bad if you show up late for a job interview.
 -- Look Sharp, Act Sharp -- For you, it might be just a summer job. For an employer, the job you do affects his or her business, future, and family. If you were in that position, wouldn't you hire someone who looked and sounded like they cared about doing a good job?
 -- Don't Brag, But Be Honest -- Employers feel better about hiring people with a "track record." If you are proud of a previous job, your school activities, or other accomplishments, say so honestly and describe what you did.
 -- Know Where You're Going -- Take a little time to find out something about the place where you want to work. You'll show the prospective employer you're interested in getting that job, not just a job.
 -- Why Do You Want This Job? -- Be prepared to tell an employer why you want a job, what your goals are, and why you think you can do a good job.
 -- Work Hard -- When you find a job, do it well. Show up on time. Be well-groomed. Give it your best effort. The harder you work and the more you learn, the faster you can move into a position with more responsibility and better pay.
 -- Find People You Can Learn From -- I never got a fancy education, but I was good at finding employers who would teach me things about the restaurant business, which is what I wanted to learn more than anything. When you get a job, find a mentor -- someone who will help you overcome your flaws, give you advice, and help you learn important lessons about business and about yourself.
 By following these simple tips from Dave Thomas, teens can have the edge they need to land the job they want.
 -0- 4/9/93
 /CONTACT: Denny Lynch of Wendy's, 614-764-3413/
 (WEN)


CO: Wendy's ST: Ohio IN: LEI SU:

BM -- CLFNS1 -- 4490 04/09/93 07:31 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 9, 1993
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