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WATCHA: IT'S HALF RIOT, ALL MUSIC.

Byline: Sandra Barrera Staff Writer

At times, Friday's Watcha Tour at the Universal Amphitheatre resembled a riot more than it did a concert.

Security personnel waited in the trenches for a lull in the music to go fetch rabble rousers in the swirling shove match on the floor known as the mosh pit. Some even moshed in the walkways, tripping those of us who were simply trying to get to our seats with a drink in hand.

It was madness, all right.

And it started the moment the Mexican rap-core band Molotov took to the stage.

The band's volatile blend of funk and rap, with a dash of speed metal thrown in for edge, was one of the most anticipated performances of the night.

People ran over chairs and pushed their way down the aisles past security toward the stage.

By now, the Universal Amphitheatre was filled to capacity with the fashionably conscious crowd of mostly young Latinos, who cheered whenever Molotov hinted at playing a controversial song that was banned in some countries because its title is a derogatory term for gays.

The band dropped the title throughout its set until the end when a couple of members from Cafe Tacuba joined Molotov on stage for the song.

What's ironic is that hours later when Cafe Tacuba, a band whose music is anything but controversial, took the spotlight, it incited similar hysteria from the crowd.

But the night wasn't all bone crushing and aggressive, as Ozomatli demonstrated in its free-for-all jam, which began with a percussion brigade through the audience and ended with some of its members body surfing.

When a fight broke out in the mosh pit during one of the band's numbers, Ozomatli stopped its performing to scold the two culprits for their behavior.

The only band that appeared to have a hard time fitting into the scheme of the tour was Aterciopelados, the electronic folk band from Columbia that was better known to the Watcha crowd for its pop-punk days.

Andrea Echeverri won over some of the crowd with her bubble blowing and free goodies such as Frisbees and maracas. And inevitably, the band also won over the crowd by giving the audience three-year-old hits.
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Title Annotation:Review; L.A. Life
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Aug 15, 2000
Words:369
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