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Vietnam's deputy minister of health calls on doctors to use locally made medicines.

M2 PHARMA-May 17, 2017-Vietnam's deputy minister of health calls on doctors to use locally made medicines

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At a conference in Hanoi, Vietnam's deputy minister of health has called on hospitals to increase their use of locally manufactured medicines, English language daily Vietnam News reported on Wednesday.

According to his speech, half of the medicines prescribed are produced locally, however in larger, central hospitals, doctors opt for overseas products. As consequence, the deputy minister has urged doctors to prescribe domestic products.

He stated that of the medicines administered in the provincial-level hospitals, 35.4% were locally manufactured -- an increase of 1.5% since he began his campaign 'Vietnamese People Use Vietnam's medicines'. Meanwhile, at district-level, the rate was close to 70%, an increase of 8%.

The call comes as part of Vietnam's government-led effort to increase the use of locally made drugs. It is hoped that the campaign can help reduce hospital fees and grow the country's pharmaceutical sector.

Currently, Vietnam has 163 pharmaceutical factories that participate in its Pharmaceutical Inspection Co-operation Scheme, which necessitates good manufacturing practices to international standards.

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Publication:M2 Pharma
Geographic Code:9VIET
Date:May 17, 2017
Words:195
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