Printer Friendly

VALUE TAKES FLIGHT AT CODY'S LANDING STRIP.

Byline: Larry Lipson Daily News Restaurant Critic

Theming a restaurant seems to be the fashionable marketing practice these days.

And that goes even for such small cafes as the new ``cutesy'' Cody's Landing Strip in Burbank, a replacement for the onetime colorful little Carib place La Bamba.

Cody's is an aerophile's heaven. Airplane models are suspended from the ceiling along with such collectibles as an ancient propeller.

Photos of planes on the walls around the single dining room are a veritable history of flying.

An iced-tea pitcher stands on a piece of bullet-proof perspex from a B-17.

And the staffers wear flight togs and have military-looking identification tags engraved with the restaurant's name hanging from their necks.

The saving grace here is that the fare doesn't taste like airline food.

If it did, one could probably say goodbye to Cody and the gang in a hurry.

Instead, there's definitely someone with cooking talent working in the kitchen. Yes, it quickly becomes apparent that Cody's down-to-earth domestic fare, described on the menu as ``American clubhouse cuisine,'' comes forth as pretty tasty stuff.

And the bonus is the price is right, too. You may even bring in your own bottle of wine for no charge.

Where else can you find a reasonably thick, juicy pork chop nicely grilled, garnished with a walnut and apple chutney, paired with both a heaping portion of properly cooked spinach and cauliflower and a mound of satisfying, well-seasoned mashed potatoes - all for $7.95?

In charge of the cooking here is Kevin Conahan, who manages to put a plate of grilled swordfish with basil butter on the table for only $8.95, or a dish of prawns in a garlicky chardonnay butter sauce for $9.95.

Conahan fashions a tasty, homey meat loaf that works out fine on a french roll with marinara sauce ($5.95) at dinnertime, on sourdough at lunch, or as a dinner plate with brown gravy ($7.95). The sandwich arrives served with either a pile of good shoestrings or fresh-tasting coleslaw.

His chicken breast can be had with rosemary flavoring as a dinner entree ($8.95), or, in my opinion, better with fiery jalapeno chilis and jack cheese on a sesame roll with lettuce and tomato under the description ``Southwestern'' ($5.95) at both lunch and dinner.

Conahan's soups are usually worth a try at Cody's. One day recently, the du jour offering was a crunchy, sweet corn chowder (cup $1.50, bowl $2.95). Another time it was a fresh minestrone-style soup.

Pastas, substantially portioned, also generally satisfy. One time, an order of linguine with finely chopped Cajun sausage and a mildly peppery tomato sauce ($7.95) was successfully shared as an appetizer.

For the beefy set, there's a cowboy steak for under $10 and beef stew over noodles for $8. And no beef lover should pass up the burger here, a nifty rendition of America's favorite sandwich for $5.25.

But there's a question about Cody's apple pie. Is it really as good as it could be? As good as the person who told me about this cafe in the first place said it was?

``Incredible homemade apple pie,'' was its exact description.

The first time I had it, the dough on top was not fully baked through. The second time it was, but the thinness of the pie left me dubious. And truthfully, I've always loved a stronger cinnamon presence in apple pie.

Chef Conahan said his apple pie is evolving.

Guess for $1.95 a piece at lunch, one can't be too picky, anyway. Can one?

THE FACTS

The restaurant: Cody's Landing Strip.

Where: 1220 W. Burbank Blvd., Burbank.

When: Open for lunch from 11 a.m. to 4:30 daily except Sunday, for dinner from 4:30 to 9 p.m. nightly except Sunday, to 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Recommended items: Soups, beer-battered onion rings, 747 burger, spicy Southwestern chicken sandwich, pork chop with vegetables and mashed potatoes, meat loaf sandwich or plate, apple pie.

How much: Starters and salads from $1.50 to $10, sandwiches $5.25 and $5.95, entrees from $8 to $9.95, desserts $2 and $3. Beer and wine. MC, V.

Wine list: No list yet. Has a handful of bottlings including Beautour white ($2.95 a glass, $11.95 a bottle), Chateau Diana ($3.50 a glass, $12.95 a bottle). Napa Ridge pinot noir ($3.50 a glass, $12.95 a bottle.) Beer list ($1.50 to $3.50) includes Red Wolf and Amber Bock ($2 each.) Corkage free.

Reservations: Taken. Call (818) 842-9188.

Our rating: Three Stars for food; Three Stars for service; One Star for wine; Three and One Half Stars for value.
COPYRIGHT 1997 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1997, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:L.A. LIFE
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Article Type:Restaurant Review
Date:May 2, 1997
Words:788
Previous Article:TEE TIME AT BRITISH BAR AND GRILL.
Next Article:HOT SPOTS : TIDBIT HEAVEN.
Topics:


Related Articles
SPACE 'LIFEBOAT' TEST FLIGHT NEARS.
IT'S HOMEY AT PLACE FOR STEAK : NAME TELLS NO LIE, BUT THERE'S LAMB, FISH AND SEAFOOD, TOO.
`MALLARD,' `ZIPPY' ON THE BALLOT.
EDITORIAL : THINKING SMALL; LAX OFFICIALS STILL FAIL TO GRASP THE CONCEPT OF REGIONAL GROWTH.
AIRPLANE LANDS ON FREEWAY : MOTORISTS STEER CLEAR OF CRAFT ROLLING TO OFF-RAMP.
ALL HAIL INDICTED KING CODY.
Institute builds online BV/FLS community.
A portal for business valuation, forensic/litigation services.
Join an e-community.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters