Printer Friendly

Use of the internet and productivity of microbusinesses: evidence from the Peruvian case (2007-2010)/El uso de internet y la productividad de las microempresas: evidencias del caso peruano (2007-2010).

Introduction

Information and communications technologies (ICTs), particularly the Internet, are technologies which, in general terms, allow for faster communication, as well as greater access to and use of information. A rapid expansion in the use of ICT in companies was recently observed (ITU, 2011). These ICTs are expected to transform, in the medium term, the productive and social relationships of the world in which we live.

Recent reports and international studies have also described ICT as a great opportunity for the development of both small businesses and the poorest households in Latin America (see ECLAC, 2008; ITU, 2012; UNCTAD, 2011; WEF, 2011, among others). More important, it has been sustained that the Internet enables microbusinesses to reduce search and transaction costs, improve communications throughout the entire value chain, obtain better training, and enhance their relationships with the state through e-government.

The positive relationship between the use of the ICT and productivity has been broadly studied for different sectors and for diverse ICT tools. However, in Peru or even all of Latin America, no thorough or quantitative investigation has yet been made to determine the existence of a direct relationship between the use of the Internet and the productivity of businesses.

This lack of research takes greater relevance in the case of microbusinesses, (3) which represent 47% of the GDP of Peru, 57% of the sources of employment in cities, and 43% of the sources of employment in rural areas. (4) However, their productivity level is very low (they represent about 5% of the productivity of large and mega companies). This is clearly shown, for instance, by the fact that they only represent 2% of Peru's total exports.

Thus, the overall purpose of this article is to provide evidence that speaks to the question of whether the use of the Internet has an effect on the productivity of microbusinesses. Based on the conclusions of this article, we will be able to suggest policies to determine the feasibility of promoting the use of the Internet as a tool to improve the productivity of businesses.

To that end, we analyze the hypothesis that the use of the Internet by the microbusiness owner has a positive effect on the productivity of the owner's company. This is because business owners who use the Internet have a comparative advantage in terms of information and communications, since they are able to obtain information and communicate more frequently and effectively (e.g., with their employees, suppliers, and customers).

To verify our hypothesis, we will estimate how the use of the Internet by the business owner affects the productivity of his or her company (holding constant all other factors affecting productivity) in order to And a causal link between increased adoption of the Internet by business owners and greater productivity of microbusinesses. This is known as the potential outcomes approach, or the Rubin-Holland causal model. (5)

The above mentioned model is the most convenient one, since there are "unobservable variables" typical of each individual that may bias the results. (6) For this reason, we use a first differences (FD) model that enables us to correct this problem.

This article, furthermore, addresses the issue of the adoption of the Internet beyond the simple determination of whether it is "used or not used," since our purpose is to create an Internet adoption index. This allows for a measurement of the Internet's effect on the productivity that is more precise than the one that would be obtained if only a "used/not used" indicator were employed.

The results of our research show that an increase in the adoption index (which has a 0-100 range) has an average effect of 0.04 peruvian "nuevos soles"(PEN) (7) per worked hour. This represents 1.5% of the sample's average productivity, a clearly noteworthy effect.

The finding of a positive effect of the use of the Internet on the productivity of these companies enables us to design policies aimed at reducing the productivity gap between this important group of companies and larger companies, thus improving the overall economic development of Peru.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

1. Analytical Framework and Hypothesis

1.1 Effect of ICT on the Economy

Katz (2009) points out that companies decide to adopt ICT to gain productivity (or competitiveness) to defeat their competitors. This works as an incentive for the other companies in the sector to adopt these technologies as well, thus causing them to compete on an equal level. This effect would translate, as Gi-Soon (2005) points out, into an improvement in the decision-making process undertaken by business owners, who would save both time and money when searching for information, since ICT would enable them to access more and better information. As we stated above, this ultimately helps the business owner make better-informed decisions in a faster way, thereby increasing the productivity of the owner's company. (8) This is shown in Figure 1.

This study thus seeks to find out in what way the use of the Internet by the business owner has a positive effect on the productivity of its business. The hypothesis under study is as follows:

Hypothesis: A greater use of the Internet by a microbusiness owner has a positive effect on the work productivity of the owner's business, as it facilitates access to more and better sources of information and communication.

According to the above hypothesis, the use of the Internet facilitates access to better sources of information and communication, thereby reducing both transaction costs (most importantly, information search costs) and the uncertainty associated with decision-making processes (since information asymmetries would be reduced). This would enable the business owner to make better decisions, and as a result, the productivity of the owner's company would naturally improve. Additionally, the Internet also facilitates communication between the key people of the business, as well as with suppliers and customers. Furthermore, this improved communication helps to reduce both transaction costs (especially the costs resulting from coordination activities with customers, partners, and suppliers) and the uncertainty inherent in the decision-making process, since communication lowers the risk of making mistakes.

2. Review of Empirical Literature

Given the amplitude and variety of research studies conducted in connection with the issue under analysis, some clarifications should be made for this review of the empirical literature not to be too extensive. We will not include the studies analyzing the effect of the use of the Internet on microbusinesses in developed countries, since such businesses are not comparable with those in developing countries. Moreover, since this research is quantitative in nature, our review will not include those studies using exclusively a qualitative approach. Also, our work only takes into consideration those studies which consider the Internet to be part of the ICTs worthy of analysis, despite the existing abundant literature focusing on the use of mobile phones. This exclusion is deemed necessary because there are important differences between the referred technologies and the ways in which they affect productivity.

2.1 Approaches to the Relationship Between the Use of the Internet and the Productivity of Businesses in Peru

Only a few studies have been carried out in Peru on the relationship between the use of the Internet and the productivity of microbusinesses. Further, the studies that address this issue do so using approaches with variables that measure productivity in an indirect manner (with values such as household income or salary), use small samples, or conduct only exploratory studies.

The studies of Rodriguez (2008), Tello (2011), De Los Rios (2010), and Medina and Fernandez (2011) are the latest research studies that have been conducted in Peru concerning the effect of the use of the Internet on such variables related with productivity as income, salaries, and profitability.

Although all these studies have found a positive and significant effect, their main limitations are that the variables used only capture productivity in an indirect manner. Moreover, the variable measuring use of the Internet in these studies does not distinguish among the different types of use of that tool; that is, these studies do not take into account the potential differences that using the Internet for different applications may have. This restricts the capacity of these studies to capture the effect of this service.

Kuramoto (2007), Aguero and Perez (2010), and Proexpansion (2005) conducted exploratory studies on the relationship between the use of the Internet and the productivity of microbusinesses in Peru. Unlike the studies mentioned in the preceding paragraph, they do take into consideration the different types of uses of the Internet, remarking that it is important to acknowledge these different uses because their impact on businesses is, likewise, different. In spite of this, no causality relationships could be obtained from these studies' results.

2.2 Approaches in Other Developing Countries

Although scholars focusing on other developing countries may have done advanced research on the effect of the Internet on the productivity of microbusinesses, it should be noted that the characteristics of the companies analyzed in such countries may have significant differences with the subject matter under study in our research.

Esselaar, Stork, Ndlwalana, and Deen-Swarray (2007); Chowdhury and Wolf (2003); and Amoros, Planellas, and Batista-Foguet (2007) have studied, through diverse strategies, the effect of the use of the Internet on the productivity of microbusinesses. Amoros et al., in particular, have found that it is not productivity that is affected, but the size of the company involved.

Esselaar et al. (2007) and Chowdhury and Wolf (2003) focus their analysis on the African case and draw mixed conclusions on the effect of ICT. For example, Chowdhury and Wolf have found that the use of ICTs has no effect on the profitability of companies, but that it has a negative effect on productivity. However, they point out that maybe this is because the effects of the use of these technologies will only become evident in the days to come. Esselaar et al., who have found a positive effect in the use of ICTs, sustain that the negative results obtained by Chodwhury and Wolf are due to incorrect measurements of the characteristics of microbusinesses.

3. Methodology

The following equation (1) summarizes the relationship we intend to prove through this work:

Productivity = f(Use of the Internet I Control (1) variables) + error

This equation contains four important elements for the correct application of the model:

i) Dependent variable: productivity of the microbusiness.

ii) Treatment variable: the use of the Internet by the business owner.

iii) Group of control variables: those variables included in the model to obtain a better measurement of the effect of the treatment variable.

iv) The white noise or "error term"

Since this article aims at finding a cause-effect relationship, we have selected the potential results approach, also known as the Rubin-Holland causal model.

As it relates to our problem, this approach consists of finding a causal link between a greater adoption of the Internet by the business (specifically, by the microbusiness owner) and a greater productivity rate. (9) In simpler words, specific to this particular case, we wonder what the productivity rate would be if the business owner had used the Internet (in the case that the owner did not use it), and vice versa.

The main reason why this type of approach is used is that it enables us to treat directly the endogeneity that may exist between the productivity variable and the use of the Internet. For instance, we could mention a scenario where an observed increase in productivity might occur due to "unobservable" factors (where such increase, in turn, may affect the extent to which the Internet is used).

Thus, for example, one type of problem we intend to prevent is a situation where a third variable, "E," would be the one giving rise to a change in the adoption level and affecting productivity at the same time. This would cause the observed relationship between these variables to be biased, since the model would be capturing the effect of "E," and not the effect of the actual use of the Internet.

This is especially relevant since productivity is a variable which depends on the unobservable variable "ability" (the effect of which has been broadly studied by empirical authors and is known as "ability bias"). This means that there is a positive bias toward the adoption of the Internet and the productivity of those individuals who are more "skilled" or "intelligent." (10) Failing to take this problem into consideration results in an incorrect measurement of the relationship, since doing so causes us to overrate the true causal link between the use of the Internet and the productivity rate. In the next section, we describe the econometric model we have selected.

3.1 Econometric Model

We have decided to work with the first differences (FD) model. (11) The reason for this choice is that ability is an individual characteristic that does not change over time. By applying this methodology, we prevent the model from containing the referred ability bias and obtain a consistent estimator. (12)

Thus, the first differences model is represented by the following equation (2): (13)

[[DELTA]y.sub.i,t,t-1] = [[beta].sub.0] + [[DELTA]X.sub.i,t,t-1]'[[beta].sub.1] + [X.sub.i,t-1]'[[beta].sub.2] + [y.sub.i,t-1]'[[beta].sub.3] + [[DELTA][epsilon].sub.i,t,t-1], (2)

where [y.sub.it] is the vector that observes the productivity of the business owned by individual i during period t. Naturally, the variable expressed as [[DELTA]y.sub.i,t,t-1] represents the variation between period t and t-1. [X.sub.it] is the control variables matrix of the model (such as the education of the business owner and the employees, the number of employees, their age, etc.). Based on the periods matrix, we built matrix [[DELTA]X.sub.i,t,t-1], which contains the variations of the variable adoption of the Internet by businesses, as well as the rest of the control variables between periods t and t-1. Vector [[beta].sub.1] contains the coefficients vector for this matrix. Matrix [X.sub.i,t-1] represents the lagging values of this matrix (that is, the original period with respect to which the difference is obtained), and vector [[beta].sub.2] represents the coefficients for that matrix.

Vector [y.sub.it-1] contains the values of the dependent variable in the period elapsing before the difference, also to control--by means of a differentiated effects approach (depending on where the variable is placed)--the value of the dependent variable in the initial period. Coefficient ([[beta].sub.3] estimates the effect of having different initial productivity levels in the future variation of productivity. (14)

3.2 Database

The data used for this study were obtained from the National Household Survey (ENAHO) for 2007-2010, which presents economic information on microbusinesses, such as the company's activity years, the number of employees, their qualifications and expertise, and the company's expenses. The survey also contains information on the use of the Internet by the business owner, as well as his or her socioeconomic characteristics.

The survey is a cross-sectional survey, but it contains a panel data sub-sample. The original cross-sectional sample consists of 11,211 observations for 2007; 11,047 for 2008; 11,383 for 2009; and 11,378 for 2010. (15)

Of the total, 1,994 panel data observations were made for 2007-2008, 1,920 were made for 20082009, and 2,020 were made for 2009-2010. Using these three periods as a difference pseudo-panel, we obtain 5,920 observations formed by 10,970 cross-sectional observations (approximately 25% of the original cross-sectional sample).

3.3 Model Variables

3.3.1 Result variable

Unfortunately, we cannot observe the productivity of the company's employees, and calculating it directly would be very difficult (if not impossible). (16) For this work, we use the "proxy" variable to measure the value added per average worked hour in the company, which we express as: VA/[H.sub.it]

Where VA is the total value added (which comprises both the output for the company's own consumption and the output for sale), and H is the total worked hours in the business owned by individual i in year t. We use this variable as an approximate value of the productivity per worker. However, in order for the results not to be biased by the use of this proxy variable, another two variables (17) will be used to test the robustness of the results.

3.3.2 Control variables

We subdivide the control variables group into four parts: [Z.sub.it],[W.sub.it], [[gamma].sub.t] and [[delta].sub.it].

Matrix [Z.sub.it] contains 11 variables typical of the business owned by i for each period t. These variables are the salaries paid to workers, the experience (or activity years) of the business, the percentage of workers who are related to the business owner, (18) the percentage of unpaid workers, a dichotomous variable that indicates whether the business is located in a city or rural location, (19) three dichotomous variables that indicate the business' economic sector (production, services, or trade), and three dichotomous variables that indicate the business' payroll. (20)

Matrix [W.sub.it] contains nine variables related to the business owner's characteristics and labor in business i for period t. As part of this matrix, we find the following data points: the workers' average education, (21) the square of such education value, the workers' average years of expertise, the square of such average expertise value, the workers' average years of age, the square of such average age, if the business owner is a head of household, if the owner is an entrepreneur, (22) and the mother tongue of the business owner. (23)

Matrix [[gamma].sub.t] contains two dichotomous variables used to distinguish the year intervals in the model for the three years of the sample. (24)

Matrix 8it contains the dichotomous variables used to distinguish the geographic area where the business owned by i was located during period t. Eight dichotomous variables were created for the eight Peruvian areas. (25)

3.3.3 Interest variable

The interest variable "use or adoption of the Internet" will be measured in this work using the Lefebvre and Lefebvre index (ILL), which measures the extent to which the Internet is adopted for each business owner. (26)

Using this methodology, we created equation (3), where we find eight applications of the Internet that business owners may use. Each of these applications has a weighting [p.sub.j], with j being the variable indicating what application is shown in the weight factor. This score is higher for the applications considered to be more useful to improve the productivity of businesses. Thus, variable A is a dichotomous variable for each application. It is assigned a value of 1 if the microbusiness owner adopts the technology, and a value of 0 if the owner does not.

Although this allows us to simplify the object under analysis, it also leads to the problem of determining what weight factors should be used. (27) For this study, we have chosen to use ad hoc weight factors specific to this project. By doing this, we avoid problems resulting from the use of weight factors from prior studies that may lead us to make incorrect assumptions. For this reason, the new weight factors must be selected in an arbitrary way, since there is no previous work indicating how to assign those weightings for the Peruvian case.

The value of index [ILL.sub.it] is the sum of the eight dichotomous variables weighted by relevance. Thus, with this definition, the formula of the treatment variable is:

[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (3)

In selecting the weight factors, we are unavoidably assuming the risk of being arbitrary and biased. For this reason, we have decided to conduct electronic surveys among specialists in the field of ICTs. The results of the estimation of these weight factors are described in the following section.

4. Results

4.1 The Internet Adoption Index

For this article, we conducted surveys among specialists in the field. Between September and November 2010, we prepared and sent the electronic survey to approximately 40 potential respondents. To select them, we used the bibliographical section of this study (only those who have done research on ICT involving the Peruvian case were selected) and also included representatives of the MTC (the ministry in charge of telecommunications issues), OSIPTEL (the telecommunications regulatory agency), and a consulting firm specializing in telecommunications with a main focus on economic issues.

As a result, we obtained 10 completed surveys. Among the specialists who completed the survey were professional researchers of the economic and social effects of ICTs, consultants in telecommunications who advise public and private entities, and MTC and OSIPTEL officers. A summary of these surveys is included in Appendix 1. (28)

Figure 2 is a box graph (where the maximum, minimum, median and mean answers are presented) which shows that the applications "obtaining information" and "communication" are the ones deemed by specialists to be the most important ones to improve the productivity of microbusinesses. This is consistent with the theoretical and empirical literature, which describes these two uses of the Internet as the ones with the greatest potential for improving productivity.

There is a marked variety in the responses obtained, which can be observed in Appendix 1 and Table 1: The mean value is biased towards the extreme values of the survey. For this reason, we have decided to work with the median value. Table 2 shows a list with the weight factors chosen. In order to simplify the interpretation of coefficients, the weight factors in that table were standardized for them to be within the 0-100 range and not between 0-35.

4.2 Econometric Results

Table 3 presents the result of the FD model. Column 1 shows the coefficient of the effect of a variation in the use of the Internet by the business owner, further controlled by the dummies of variable [[gamma].sub.t] which control the data pool for a certain period. Column 2 includes, also, the variations in the control variables of matrix Z (characteristics of the business). Column 3 presents the results as it includes the model of column 1 only with the variations in the variables of matrix W (characteristics of the business owner and labor). Column 4 shows the results including both variable groups (Z and W). Finally, column 5 presents the results of the model including both matrixes (Z and W), as well as geographical control variables of matrix [[delta].sub.it]. (29)

The coefficient of the variation in the adoption of the Internet by the business owner is very closely related with the variation in the productivity of its business within the same period. It can also be noted that this coefficient is relatively constant, since its value ranges between 0.044 and 0.040, which shows that the inclusion of control variables does affect the estimator, although not in a very significant manner.

This is initial evidence of the robustness of our estimator, and furthermore, it shows that including a larger number of control variables will probably not have a significant effect on the results obtained.

The coefficient can be interpreted as follows: For each one-point increase in the ILL adoption index within the same time period, the value added per worked hour increases approximately PEN 0.0430 (all other variables held constant). If this value is compared with the productivity mean of the sample, we note that it is equivalent to 1.5% of the total. This means that each one-point increase in the ILL index has an average effect similar to an increase of 1.5% of the average productivity of the microbusinesses in the sample.

Although this value may seem modest at a first glance, a clarification should be made with respect to both the estimator based on the weight factors table and multiplying such value by the number of worked hours. Table 4 presents a conversion table which may be useful to that end. However, it is worth noting that this table shows information for reference purposes only, since the "potential effects" shown in the table have not been directly estimated in a regression. Rather, using the values obtained from the surveys, we intend to "rebuild" the effect that each of these applications would have.

The aim of Table 4 is to provide information on the effect of the Internet that is easier to understand. Thus, as we rebuild the applications for which the index was created, we can show the "potential effect" of each of those applications but assuming that the coefficient will not vary when each application is treated separately.

Columns 1 and 2 of the table show the applications and the standardized weight factors for each application, respectively. Column 3 shows the effect of each of those applications on the value added per worked hour at the business. Finally, column 4 shows the potential effect as a percentage of the average productivity of the sample.

The table shows, for example, that the use of the Internet for communication purposes has a weight factor of 18.57. This means that the use of that application improves productivity in that value multiplied by the estimated coefficient since it measures the effect of a one-point increase of the index).

This means that this application has the potential effect of increasing the productivity of the business by PEN 0.74 in terms of the value added per worked hour. This can also be calculated with respect to all the other applications. The potential effects would therefore prove to be relevant, since the average productivity of businesses represented PEN 2.5 and PEN 3.18 in 2007 and 2010, respectively. Moreover, as shown in column 4, the relative magnitude of the use of one of these applications ranges between 8.6% (for "entertainment") and 28% for "obtaining information" and "communication."

4.3 Measuring the Robustness of the Results

As a way to validate the selection of the FD method, we used a least squares approach to study the relationship between the use of the Internet by business owners and productivity. Through this model, we obtained a coefficient higher than the one estimated using the FD model. This higher value verifies our concerns described in the preceding chapter regarding the issue of endogeneity between both variables as a result of an "ability bias" (which, if not corrected, would have caused us to overestimate the effect). (31)

On another note, the potential problem that the results of this estimation may be biased to some extent due to the selection of the result variable is solved through the implementation of the same model, with two alternative proxy variables for the productivity of the business. (32) The results are equally meaningful in statistical terms. This clearly shows that the results previously obtained with the "value added per worked hour" variable are reliable, and that the methodology applied was adequate.

5. Conclusions

The purpose of this article was to test the hypothesis that greater use of the Internet by business owners leads to greater productivity of their microbusinesses. To prove this, we used a data sample of Peruvian microbusiness owners from 2007-2010.

Although there are previous research studies which have addressed the importance of ICTs for small companies, there are no adequate previous studies in Peru which directly analyze the effect of the use of the Internet on the productivity of microbusinesses. Those who have attempted to do so have not succeeded in showing that their results can be interpreted as the outcome of a cause-effect relationship. To ill this gap, this article aims to estimate the causal relationship between the use of the Internet and the productivity of microbusinesses.

With the above purpose in mind, we built an Internet adoption index using the Lefebvre and Lefebvre (1996) index. This has allowed us to grasp more thoroughly the potential of the Internet to improve productivity. (33)

Using the aforementioned index, we calculated the effect of the use of the Internet on the productivity through the first differences (FD) method. The results indicate that a one-point increase in the ILL index improves, in turn, the productivity of the business (approached as the value added per worked hour) in PEN 0.04.34 Although at a first glance the effect may seem insignificant, it should be noted that the index ranges between 0 and 100 (that is, it can increase up to 100 points). Thus, the effect is significant if we compare it with the average productivity of the sample, which is equivalent to PEN 2.7 per worked hour. Each one-point increase in the index has an effect that is approximately equivalent to 1.5% of the average productivity of the sample.

From the observations gathered in this study, we suggest the design of policies aimed at promoting and increasing the use of the Internet by microbusiness owners. Moreover, conducting more research on the specific characteristics of the effect on different sectors and different business contexts is also of the utmost importance.

APPENDIX 1

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

APPENDIX 2
Table 5. Complete Results of the FD Model for the Sample in
Differences.

Dependent variable: First difference in the value added per worked
hour

Independent variables              (1)          (2)

First difference in the Internet   0.044 ***    0.044 ***
adoption index-ILL (t-stat)        -3.658       -3.756

Lagging value of the               0.243 ***    0.235 ***
adoption index

Lagging value of the               -0.786 ***   -0.77 ***
dependent variable

Dichotomous variable indicating    0.057        0.063
if the period in question is
2008-2009 (b)

Dichotomous variable indicating    0.401        0.446 *
if the period in question is
2009-2010 (b)

Annual variation of the                         0.365 ***
wages paid per worked hour

Variation in the business'                      -0.026 *
activity years

Annual variation of the                         1.529 *
percentage of relatives
working for the business

Annual variation of the                         3.946 ***
percentage of unpaid
workers in the business

Dichotomous variable                            -0.855 **
indicating if the business
is in the production sector

Dichotomous variable                            0.278
indicating if the business
is in the services sector

Dichotomous variable                            -0.846
indicating if the business
is in the trade sector

Dichotomous variable                            -0.98 ***
indicating if the business
has between 1 and 5
employees (c)

Dichotomous variable                            -1.36 ***
indicating if the business
has more than 5 workers (c)

Annual variation of the
workers' average education

Annual variation of the
square of the workers'
average education

Annual variation of the
workers' average expertise

Annual variation of the
square of the workers'
average expertise

Annual variation of
the workers' average age

Annual variation of the
square of the workers'
average age

Dichotomous variable
indicating if the business
owner is the head of
household within the
period under analysis

Dichotomous variable
indicating if the business
owner is an entrepreneur
(1 if it is)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
North Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Central Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
South Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
North Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Central Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
South Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Jungle area (d)

Constant                           2.913 ***    2.880 ***
(t-stat)                           (13.96)      (13.50)
Observations                       5,925        5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.341        0.352

Independent variables              (3)          (4)

First difference in the Internet   0.044 ***    0.044 ***
adoption index-ILL (t-stat)        -3.681       -3.766

Lagging value of the               0.243 ***    0.140 ***
adoption index

Lagging value of the               -0.783 ***   -0.773 ***
dependent variable

Dichotomous variable indicating    -0.133       0.039
if the period in question is
2008-2009 (b)

Dichotomous variable indicating    0.315        0.436
if the period in question is
2009-2010 (b)

Annual variation of the                         0.372 ***
wages paid per worked hour

Variation in the business'                      0.026
activity years

Annual variation of the                         1.276 *
percentage of relatives
working for the business

Annual variation of the                         3.651 ***
percentage of unpaid
workers in the business

Dichotomous variable                            -0.839 **
indicating if the business
is in the production sector

Dichotomous variable                            0.249
indicating if the business
is in the services sector

Dichotomous variable                            -0.847
indicating if the business
is in the trade sector

Dichotomous variable                            -1.024 ***
indicating if the business
has between 1 and 5
employees (c)

Dichotomous variable                            -1.367 ***
indicating if the business
has more than 5 workers (c)

Annual variation of the            -0.093       -0.054
workers' average education

Annual variation of the            0.007        0.003
square of the workers'
average education

Annual variation of the            -0.073 *     -0.105 **
workers' average expertise

Annual variation of the            0.001 *      0.001 *
square of the workers'
average expertise

Annual variation of                0.029        0.015
the workers' average age

Annual variation of the            0.000        -0.000
square of the workers'
average age

Dichotomous variable               0.553        0.525
indicating if the business
owner is the head of
household within the
period under analysis

Dichotomous variable               0.093        0.069
indicating if the business
owner is an entrepreneur
(1 if it is)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
North Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Central Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
South Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
North Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Central Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
South Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating
if the business is in the
Jungle area (d)

Constant                           2.976 ***    2.886 ***
(t-stat)                           (13.51)      (12.94)
Observations                       5,925        5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.343        0.352

Independent variables              (5)

First difference in the Internet   0.040 ***
adoption index-ILL (t-stat)        -3.521

Lagging value of the               0.218 ***
adoption index

Lagging value of the               -0.778 ***
dependent variable

Dichotomous variable indicating    0.046
if the period in question is
2008-2009 (b)

Dichotomous variable indicating    0.444
if the period in question is
2009-2010 (b)

Annual variation of the            0.373 ***
wages paid per worked hour

Variation in the business'         0.028
activity years

Annual variation of the            1.292 *
percentage of relatives
working for the business

Annual variation of the            3.679 ***
percentage of unpaid
workers in the business

Dichotomous variable               -0.795 **
indicating if the business
is in the production sector

Dichotomous variable               0.269
indicating if the business
is in the services sector

Dichotomous variable               -0.849
indicating if the business
is in the trade sector

Dichotomous variable               -1.016 ***
indicating if the business
has between 1 and 5
employees (c)

Dichotomous variable               -1.367 ***
indicating if the business
has more than 5 workers (c)

Annual variation of the            -0.063
workers' average education

Annual variation of the            0.003
square of the workers'
average education

Annual variation of the            -0.106 **
workers' average expertise

Annual variation of the            0.001 *
square of the workers'
average expertise

Annual variation of                0.016
the workers' average age

Annual variation of the            -0.000
square of the workers'
average age

Dichotomous variable               0.527
indicating if the business
owner is the head of
household within the
period under analysis

Dichotomous variable               0.069
indicating if the business
owner is an entrepreneur
(1 if it is)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -1.233 ***
if the business is in the
North Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -1.017 ***
if the business is in the
Central Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -0.464
if the business is in the
South Coast area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -1.245 *
if the business is in the
North Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -0.676 *
if the business is in the
Central Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -0.582 *
if the business is in the
South Highlands area (d)

Dichotomous variable indicating    -0.790 *
if the business is in the
Jungle area (d)

Constant                           2.980 ***
(t-stat)                           (8.194)
Observations                       5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.354

Note: ***p < 0.01; **p < 0.05; and *p < 0.1.

(a) The variables of the model presented in the "Methodology"
section as "dichotomous variable indicating if the business is in a
city or rural location" and "dichotomous variable indicating if the
business owner speaks a native mother tongue" were not included in
the results table, since they do not present any temporal
variations and thus have no effect on the dependent variable.

(b) The dichotomous variable indicating if the period in question
is 2007-2008 was not included to avoid dealing with the issue of
perfect collinearity.

(c) The dichotomous variable indicating whether the business has
independent contractors was not included to avoid dealing with the
issue of perfect collinearity.

(d) The dichotomous variable indicating whether the business is in
the Metropolitan Lima area was not included to avoid dealing with
the issue of perfect collinearity.


References

Aguero, A., & Perez, P. (2010). El uso de Internet de los trabajadores independientes y microempresarios en el Peru [The use of the Internet by independent contractors and microbusiness owners in Peru]. Research paper presented at the Conference ACORN-REDECOM 2010 held in Brasilia, Brazil.

Aker, J. (2008). Does digital divide or provide? The Impact of Cell Phones on Grain Markets in Niger, BREAD Working Paper 177.

Amoros, J., Planellas, M., & Batista-Foguet, J. (2007). Does Internet technology improve performance in small and medium enterprises? Evidence from selected Mexican firms. Academia, Revista Latinoamericana de Administracion [Academia, Latin American Administration Journal], 39, 71-91.

Angrist, J., & Pischke, J. (2009). Mostly harmless econometrics: An empiricist companion. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Chacaltana, J. (2008). Una evaluacion del regimen laboral especial para la microempresa en Peru, al cuarto ano de vigencia [An evaluation of the especial employment regime for microbusinesses in Peru on the 4th anniversary of its enactment]. Report commissioned by the ILO.

Chowdhury, S. K., & Wolf, S. (2003). Use of ICTs and economic performance of SMEs in East Africa. Helsinki: World Institute for Development Economics Research-United Nations University.

Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). (2008). La sociedad de la informacion en America Latina y el Caribe: Desarrollo de las tecnologias y tecnologias para el desarrollo [Information societies in Latin America and the Caribbean: Development of technologies and technologies for development]. Santiago de Chile: ECLAC.

De Los Rios, C. (2010). Impacto del uso de Internet en el bienestar de los hogares Peruanos: Evidencia de un panel de hogares 2007-2009 [Impact of the use of the Internet on the wellbeing of Peruvian households: Evidence of a household panel, 2007-2009]. Lima, Peru: DIRSI.

Dinardo, J., & Pischke, J. (1997). The returns to computer use revisited: Have pencils changed the wage structure too? The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112(1), 291-303.

Esselaar, S., Stork, C., Ndlwalana, A., & DeenSwarray, M. (2007). ICT usage and its impact on profitability of SMEs in 13 African countries. Information Technologies & International Development, 4(1), 87-100.

Gi-Soon, S. (2005). The impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on rural households: A holistic approach applied to the case of Lao People's Democratic Republic. Jakarta: UNV/UNDP.

Holland, P. (1986). Statistics and causal inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 81(396), 945-960.

International Telecommunication Union (ITU). (2011). Measuring the information society. Geneva: ITU.

Jensen, R. (2007). The digital provide: Information (technology), market performance and welfare in the South India fisheries sector. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 122(3), 879-924.

Katz, R. (2009). El papel de las TICs en el desarrollo. Propuesta de America Latina a los retos economicos actuales [The role of ICT in development. Latin America's proposal to the current economic challenges]. Madrid: Fundacion Telefonica.

Kuramoto, J. (2007). TICs, MIPYMEs y genero en el Peru: Una primera aproximacion [A study on ICT; micro, small and medium-sized companies and gender in Peru]. Proyecto GATE, Oficina de la Mujer en el Desarrollo, Orden de Trabajo No. 2, USAID Peru [GATE Project, Women Development Ofice, work order No. 2, USAID Peru].

Lefebvre, E., & Lefebvre, L. (1996). Information and telecommunication technologies: The impact of their adoption on small and medium-sized enterprises. Ottawa: IDRC.

Medina, P., & Fernandez, R. (2011). Evaluacion del impacto del acceso a las TIC sobre el ingreso de los hogares. Una aproximacion a partir de la metodologia del Propensity Score Matching y datos de panel para el caso peruano [Impact evaluation of the access to ICT on household income. An approach using the methodology of propensity score matching and panel data for the Peruvian case]. Lima, Peru: DIRSI.

Monge, R., Alfaro, C., & Alfaro, J. (2005). Las TICs en las pymes de Centroamerica [The ICTs' role in small and medium-sized companies of Central America]. Ottawa: IDRC.

Proexpansion. (2005). Identiicacion de necesidades de las MYPE con respecto a las tecnologias de la informacion y comunicaciones (TIC) [Identification of the needs of small and medium-sized companies with respect to information and communication technologies (ICT)]. Lima, Peru: PromPYME.

Rodriguez, E. (2008). La "brecha digital" en el mercado de trabajo: El aprovechamiento de la Internet como determinante de la desigualdad salarial [The "digital gap" in the labor market: The use of the Internet as determinant of wage inequality]. Lima, Peru: CIES.

Rubin, D. (1974). Estimating causal effects of treatments in randomized and nonrandomized studies. Journal of Educational Psychology, 66(5), 688-701.

Tello, M. (2011). Science and technology, ICT and profitability in the manufacturing sector in Peru. In M. Balboni, M. Rovira, & S. Vergara, S. (Eds.), ICT in Latin America. A microdata analysis. Santiago de Chile: ECLAC-IDRC.

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). (2011). Information Economy Report 2011. Geneva: United Nations.

Villaran, F. (2007). El mundo de la pequena empresa [The world of the small company]. Lima, Peru: Mincetur.

White, H. (1980). A heteroscedasticity-consistent covariance matrix estimator and a direct test for heteroscedasticity. Econometrica, 48, 817-838.

Woolridge, J. (2002). Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

World Economic Forum. (2011). The global information technology report 2010-2011. Geneva: WEF.

Cesar Huaroto (1)

chuaroto@iep.org.pe

Assistant Researcher

Instituto de Estudios Peruanos

694 Horacio Urteaga Avenue

Lima

Peru

(1.) Several people have collaborated in different ways to help me prepare this article, and I wish to convey my deepest thanks to them all. I would like to offer a special word of gratitude to Roxana Barrantes Caceres, Fatima Ponce, and Aileen Aguero for the comments they made throughout the different research stages. Their input has been of invaluable importance for continuously improving my research. Moreover, I would like to thank those whose numerous comments I received during my internship at the Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP) as part of the "Dialogo Regional sobre la Sociedad de la Informacion" program. I would also like to extend my most sincere thanks to all the people who, by agreeing to provide me with necessary information via e-mail, made a fundamental contribution to completing this work. Additionally, I would like to thank the valuable observations made by the many participants, attendees, and commentators of the VI Conference "ACORN-REDECOM" held in Valparaiso, Chile; the "I Workshop of Applied Economic Research" organized by the "Consorcio de Investigacion Economica y Social (CIES)"; the XXIX Economists Symposium" organized by the Peruvian Central Bank; and the IV Symposium of Economics Students organized by the Economics Department of the Pontiic Catholic University of Peru (PUCP). Furthermore, comments made by different researchers at the IEP and by colleagues specialized in Economics from the PUCP have enriched this study greatly. I assume full responsibility for any errors that may be found in this article.

(2.) I would like to express thanks for the economic support given by the CIES to conduct this research as part of the XII National Research Contest. Also, I would like to give special thanks to the Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP) for the institutional support given to this project.

(3.) A microbusiness is one with less than 10 employees, including independent workers and excluding household workers and farmers. This definition is usually used in research papers on microbusinesses prepared in Peru. See, for example, Villaran (2007) and Chacaltana (2008).

(4.) Chacaltana (2008) and Villaran (2007).

(5.) For a more detailed analysis on this approach, see Angrist and Pischke (2009). The seminal works of Rubin (1974) and Holland (1986) are also recommended.

(6.) In this regard, although the endogeneity issue will be explained in greater detail in the "Methodology" section, it is important to clarify that the main effect of endogeneity is that, in this case, it prevents us from making a causal interpretation of the results because the decision to use or not use the Internet depends on such personal characteristics as the person's "ability" (which, in the literature, has an effect known as "ability bias.").

(7.) The exchange rate between United States dollars (USD) and Peruvian "nuevos soles" (PEN) is 2.63. So, in this case, if the effects are of 0.04 PEN per hour worked, then is equivalent to 0.015 USD per hour worked.

(8.) Other authors have drawn similar conclusions in the realm of microeconomics, and have related them, in particular, with the mentality of microbusinesses. Aker (2008) and Jensen (2007) state that the main advantages of ICTs is that they help to make small decisions which are critical for microbusiness owners.

(9.) For a more detailed analysis of the nature of this model, see the introductory chapter by Angrist and Pishcke (2009), whose nomenclature was used for this work.

(10.) Although the term "ability" has several connotations, it may be sustained that "able" persons have the skill to learn how to use new technologies, are more curious about learning them, or identify more quickly the competitive advantage of adopting them. In addition, these people represent the most productive group. There is plenty of relevant literature that discusses the effects and nature of the "ability bias," although such literature is mainly focused on the estimations of the return on education, not on the particular context of the use of the Internet. The study conducted by DiNardo and Pischke (1997)--who have analyzed the "ability bias" issue in the case of the effect of the use of computers on workers' salaries--is the research work that most closely resembles our study. As in this article, it analyzes the existing endogeneity problem in the relationship between productivity and ICT use.

(11.) For a mathematical proof of how the FD model solves the "unobservable" variables problem, see Woolridge (2002), pp. 279-284.

(12.) There is another potential endogeneity problem. This problem is known as "simultaneous causality" or "bicausality," which consists of the occurrence of two causal effects at the same time. The only way to solve it is through the use of some experimental method or the instrumental variables method (IV), but this requires that there be some exogenous "instrument" that randomly "assigns" the use of the Internet. By doing that, the estimated effect might be known in one direction only. In this case, unfortunately, we do not have such an instrument, and it is therefore preferable to not use that methodology, since the results might feature an even greater bias (for more detailed information, see Angrist & Pischke, 2009).

(13.) It is worth mentioning that the variable levels are also included in the previous period, since, according to Wooldridge (2002, p. 284), when the difference is associated with lagging values, including them in the regression is the most recommended alternative.

(14.) It should also be noted that the FD model will be estimated using the least squares methodology corrected with White's variance-covariance matrix, which helps to prevent the potential problem of heteroscedasticity between the model's variables. For more detailed information on the issue of heteroscedasticity, see White (1980).

(15.) Moreover, it is worth noting that this article only takes into consideration the microbusiness owners who have indicated that their business is their main economic activity. This is because those who conduct it as a secondaryactivity are not as comparable as those who, in a certain way, obtain their main source of income from this activity.

(16.) Productivity is a directly unobservable variable that is not constant in time and is difficult to identify when the productivity of workers is a homogeneous variable within a company and, especially between different companies.

(17.) The other variables are the gross output per worked hour (VBPxh) and the total profitability per worked hour (RTxht). This will be discussed again in the "Results" section. However, for the sake of brevity, the results of these two variables are not shown.

(18.) It is important to note that all "percentage" and "average" variables were weighted by the number of hours worked by each worker at the company.

(19.) To determine the "city" or "rural" location, we used a dichotomous variable that takes the value of 1 when the company is located in a city (that is to say, if the business is located in an area with a population of 4,000 or more) and a value of 0 when the company is in a rural location (that is, if the business is located in an area with a population of less than 4,000).

(20.) The first variable determines whether there are independent contractors working for the business, the second variable indicates whether the number of employees is between one and five, and the third one indicates whether there are more than five employees working for the business.

(21.) We proxy this variable by using the average schooling years of the workers.

(22.) This is a dichotomous variable which assigns a value of 1 to those business owners who replied in the survey that they started their business because it was a more profitable alternative than working as employees for other companies, or because they preferred to be independent. Other answers, such as lack of opportunities, obligation, or support for a relative, were assigned a value of 0. This definition allows us to distinguish between survival microbusinesses (or non-enterprising businesses) and those microbusinesses which did start as a convenience decision (that is, businesses which have come to be as a result of the efforts of an entrepreneur).

(23.) This is measured as a dummy variable that takes the value of 1 if the mother language of the business owner is Spanish or some other non-indigenous one (that is, not Quechua or Aymara).

(24.) That is to say, three dichotomous variables are included which assign a value of 1 to observations between the following intervals: 2007-2008, 2008-2009, or 2009-2010. This is aimed at controlling variations, both those given in all observations within each interval and those arising from generalized characteristics (i.e., level of economic growth, inflation, etc.).

(25.) The ENAHO subdivides them into eight areas: North Coast, Center Coast, South Coast, North Highlands, Center Highlands, South Highlands, Jungle, and the Metropolitan area.

(26.) This index was created by Lefebvre and Lefebvre (1996) and subsequently applied by Monge, Alfaro, and Alfaro (2005) to the Central American case.

(27.) This is particularly relevant, since using weight factors of previous studies is not recommendable (as indicated by Lefebvre & Lefebvre, 1996, and Monge et al., 2005), as we would risk assuming that the Peruvian reality is similar to that of other countries, and even more important, that the weight factors effective at that time are still in effect today (which is very unlikely, due to the dynamism of this sector).

(28.) Although the representativeness of our sample of 10 surveyed people may be questioned, it is worth noting that, given the voluntary nature of the survey, it was impossible to receive more answers within the necessary time to complete this study. Furthermore, the background distribution of the answers was satisfactory: Of the surveyed people, five were from academic institutions, two were from the public sector (MTC or OSIPTEL) and three were from consulting firms. It should also be noted that the surveyed people are recognized for their experience in more than one of these three sectors.

Moreover, this survey did not intend to find a representativeness of the kind required for household surveys. Its purpose was to obtain some variety in the responses, and to find representatives of the public, private, and academic sectors as a way to prevent the assigned weight factors from being biased. Naturally, we admit that the results may be biased to some extent, but such bias is most probably smaller than what would have if we had used our own weight factors or weight factors from prior studies.

Additionally, the weightings have a secondary role, since, regardless of their values, the hypothesis of a positive effect will be validated with any group of weight factors having values higher than zero. This occurs because there are correlations beyond the value of the weight factors.

(29.) To see the complete results, see the table in Appendix 2.

(30.) It is important to remember, at this point, that 0.04 PEN is equivalent to 0.015 USD as mentioned in the introduction.

(31.) For the sake of brevity, these results are not shown in this study

(32.) The two alternative productivity proxy variables were gross output per worked hour and total profitability per worked hour. For the sake of brevity, these results are not included in this document.

(33.) This index was created with the collaboration of a panel of public officers, scholars, and members of the private sector, who completed electronic surveys.

(34.) The results have proven to be statistically meaningful and robust, considering the change of model and of the result variable. For more details, see the preceding section.
Table 1. Statistics from Electronic Surveys.

Use of the Internet             Minimum   Maximum   Mean   Median

Obtaining information           3.5       7         6.15   6.5
Communication (e-mail,          3.5       7         6.15   6.5
chat, etc.)

Purchasing products             2         7         4.8    5
or services

Electronic banking and/or       2         7         5.05   5.5
other financial services

Obtaining formal education      1         6.5       4.35   4.5
and/or conducting or
participating in training
activities

Conducting transactions         2         7         4.8    5
(or interacting) with
state entities or public
authorities

Entertainment (playing          0         7         2.45   2
video games, watching movies,
listening to music)

Table 2. Weight Factors of the Adoption Index.

Applications                  ILL index         Standardized
                              weight factors    index weight
                              (0-35)            factors (0-100)

Obtaining information         6.5               18.57
Communication (e-mail,        6.5               18.57
chat, etc.)

Purchasing products           5                 14.29
or services

Electronic banking            5.5               15.71
and/or other
financial services

Obtaining formal              4.5               12.86
education and/or
conducting or
participating in
training activities

Conducting transactions       5                 14.29
(or interacting) with
state entities or
public authorities

Entertainment (playing        2                 5.71
video games, watching
movies, listening to music)

Total                         35                100

Table 3. Results of the First Differences (FD) model.

Dependent variable: Annual variation of the value added
per worked hour

Independent variables              (1)          (2)

Variation of the Internet          0.044 ***    0.044 ***
adoption index (ILL)               (3.09)       (3.08)

Var. effects controls per          Yes          Yes
scale and pseudo-panel (1)

Controls per characteristics                    Yes
of the business (matrix Z)

Controls per characteristics
of the business owner and
labor (matrix W)

Controls per geographic area
and mother tongue (matrix Delta)

Constant                           1.528 ***    1.525 ***
                                   (10.00)      (9.82)

Observations                       5,925        5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.453        0.461

Independent variables              (3)          (4)

Variation of the Internet          0.044 ***    0.044 ***
adoption index (ILL)               (3.11)       (3.08)

Var. effects controls per          Yes          Yes
scale and pseudo-panel (1)

Controls per characteristics                    Yes
of the business (matrix Z)

Controls per characteristics       Yes          Yes
of the business owner and
labor (matrix W)

Controls per geographic area
and mother tongue (matrix Delta)

Constant                           1.569 ***    1.531 ***
                                   (9.41)       (9.05)

Observations                       5,925        5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.453        0.461

Independent variables              (5)

Variation of the Internet          0.040 ***
adoption index (ILL)               (2.80)

Var. effects controls per          Yes
scale and pseudo-panel (1)

Controls per characteristics       Yes
of the business (matrix Z)

Controls per characteristics       Yes
of the business owner and
labor (matrix W)

Controls per geographic area       Yes
and mother tongue (matrix Delta)

Constant                           1.952 ***
                                   (5.95)

Observations                       5,925
R2-Adjusted                        0.464

Note: *** p < 0.01; ** p < 0.05; and * p < 0.1.
The value between parentheses represents the value
of the student's t-statistic for the estimated coefficient.

(1) Included among the control variables per scale are the
value added per worked hour within the initial period and
the Internet adoption level within the original period.

Table 4. Results Conversion Table.

Coefficient value estimated under the FD model

Estimated effect of a one-point increase of the index        1.5%
as a percentage of the average productivity of the sample **

Applications                  Standardized     "Potential effect" of
                              weight factors   each application on
                                               the value added per
                                               worked hour (PEN)

Obtaining information         18.57            0.74
Communication (e-mail,        18.57            0.74
chat, etc.)

Purchasing products           14.29            0.57
or services

Electronic banking            15.71            0.63
and/or other financial
services

Obtaining formal education    12.86            0.51
and/or conducting or
participating in training
activities

Conducting transactions       14.29            0.57
(or interacting) with
state entities or public
authorities

Entertainment (playing        5.71             0.23
video games, watching
movies, listening to music)

Applications                  "Potential effect" of
                              each application as %
                              of the average
                              productivity of the
                              sample **

Obtaining information         27.9%
Communication (e-mail,        27.9%
chat, etc.)

Purchasing products           21.4%
or services

Electronic banking            23.6%
and/or other financial
services

Obtaining formal education    19.3%
and/or conducting or
participating in training
activities

Conducting transactions       21.4%
(or interacting) with
state entities or public
authorities

Entertainment (playing        8.6%
video games, watching
movies, listening to music)

Note: ** We use the productivity mean of the sample,
PEN 2.65 per worked hour, to calculate this percentage.


Introduccion

Las tecnologias de la informacion y las comunicaciones (TIC), en especial Internet, son tecnologias que, en terminos generales, permiten una comunicacion mas rapida y un mayor acceso y uso de la informacion. Recientemente se ha observado una rapida expansion del uso de las TIC dentro de las empresas (ITU, 2011), por lo que se espera que transformen, en el mediano plazo, las relaciones productivas y sociales del mundo en el que vivimos.

Recientes informes y estudios internacionales senalan a las TIC como una gran oportunidad para el desarrollo de las pequenas empresas y los hogares mas pobres de America Latina (ver, p.e.: CEPAL, 2008; ITU, 2012; UNCTAD, 2011; WEF, 2011, entre otros). Mas aun, se afirma que Internet permite a las microempresas reducir costos de busqueda y de transaccion, mejorar la comunicacion a lo largo de la cadena de valor, obtener una mejor capacitacion e incrementar la relacion con el Estado por medio del e-gobierno.

La relacion positiva entre el uso de las TIC y la productividad ha sido ampliamente estudiada respecto de diversos sectores y diversas herramientas TIC. No obstante, en el Peru, e incluso Latinoamerica, aun no se ha investigado en profundidad y de manera cuantitativa si existe una relacion directa entre el uso de Internet y la productividad de las empresas.

Esta escasez de investigaciones toma una mayor relevancia en el caso de las microempresas, (3) las cuales representan el 47% del PBI Nacional y aportan a generar el 57% del empleo urbano y el 43% del empleo rural. (4) No obstante, su nivel de productividad es muy bajo (aproximadamente, solo generan un 5% de la productividad de las grandes y mega empresas). Esto ultimo se ve reflejado, por ejemplo, en que solo aportan un 2% del total de las exportaciones del pais.

El objetivo general del presente trabajo es dar evidencia de que el uso de Internet genera un efecto en la productividad de las microempresas. A partir de dicha conclusion podremos sugerir politicas relativas a la viabilidad que tendria el fomentar el uso de Internet como una herramienta para mejorar la productividad de las microempresas.

Para esto se plantea la hipotesis de que el uso de Internet por parte de un microempresario tiene un efecto positivo en la productividad de su empresa. Esto se debe a que dichos empresarios, gracias al uso de Internet, han obtenido una ventaja comparativa en terminos de informacion y comunicaciones, pues han podido informar y comunicarse de manera mas frecuente y eficaz (tanto con sus trabajadores como con proveedores y consumidores).

Para dar evidencia en favor de dicha hipotesis, se estimara el efecto del uso de Internet por parte del empresario sobre la productividad de su empresa manteniendo constante cualquier otro factor que afecte a la productividad, a fin de encontrar un vinculo causal entre la mayor adopcion de Internet por parte del empresario y una mayor productividad de la microempresa. Este tipo de enfoque se conoce como de resultados potenciales o como el modelo de causalidad de Rubin-Holland. (5)

Este es el mejor enfoque, ya que existen "variables no observables" propias de cada individuo que pueden estar sesgando los resultados. (6) Es por esto que se utiliza un modelo de primeras diferencias (PD) que permite corregir tal problema.

En el presente trabajo, ademas, se aborda el tema de la adopcion de Internet, mas alla de la simple identificacion del tipo "usa o no usa," puesto que se construye un indice de adopcion de la red. Esto permite realizar una medicion mas precisa del efecto de Internet en la productividad que la que se obtendria al usar un indicador de "usa o no usa" de dicha tecnologia.

Los resultados de la presente investigacion muestran que un incremento en el indice de adopcion (que varia en el intervalo 0-100) tiene un efecto promedio de 0.04 nuevos soles peruanos (PEN) (7) por hora trabajada. Esto equivale al 1,5% de la media de productividad de la muestra, un efecto claramente significativo.

Al encontrarse un efecto positivo del uso de Internet sobre la productividad de las microempresas es posible disenar politicas que busquen reducir la brecha de productividad de este importante grupo de empresas y, de esta forma, mejorar el nivel de desarrollo del pais.

[GRAFICO 1 OMITIR]

1. Marco Analitico e Hipotesis

1.1 Efecto de las TIC en la Economia

Katz (2009) senala que la decision de adoptar las TIC en las empresas se da debido a la busqueda de incrementar la productividad (o competitividad) frente a la competencia. Como consecuencia, las demas empresas del sector han sido incentivadas a adoptar dichas tecnologias y, de esta forma, competir en iguales terminos. Este efecto se daria, tal como senala Gi-Soon (2005), a traves de una mejora en la toma de decisiones de los empresarios, producto del ahorro de costos y tiempo de busqueda de informacion puesto que, gracias a las TIC, se puede acceder a mayor cantidad y mejor calidad de informacion. Como se adelanto anteriormente, esto tiene como resultado final que el empresario tome decisiones mejor informadas y de manera mas rapida, lo cual incrementa la productividad de su empresa. (8) Esto se presenta en el Grafico 1.

A partir de ello, en el presente estudio se busca indagar en que medida el uso de Internet por parte del empresario tiene un efecto positivo en la productividad de su empresa. Explicitamente, la hipotesis del estudio es:

Hipotesis: Un mayor uso de Internet por parte del microempresario tiene un efecto positivo sobre la productividad laboral de su empresa al permitirle acceder a mayores y mejores fuentes de informacion y comunicaciones.

Segun la teoria presentada lineas arriba, esto se deberia a que, principalmente, el uso de Internet posibilita el acceso a mejores fuentes de informacion y comunicaciones, lo cual reduce costos de transaccion (antes que todo, costos de busqueda de informacion) y, a la vez, la incertidumbre en la toma de decisiones (al reducir asimetrias de informacion), lo que permite al empresario tomar mejores decisiones y, como consecuencia natural de esto, mejorar la productividad de su empresa. Por otra parte, Internet tambien facilita las comunicaciones entre los miembros de la empresa, asi como con sus proveedores y clientes. Asimismo, esto permite reducir los costos de transaccion (sobre todo, los costos de coordinacion con clientes, socios y proveedores) y ayuda a reducir la incertidumbre de las decisiones, dado que la comunicacion reduce los riesgos de cometer errores.

2. Revision de la Literatura Empirica

Dadas la amplitud y variedad de investigaciones relacionadas con el tema de estudio, es necesario hacer algunas acotaciones con el fin de evitar que se realice una revision muy extensa. Se excluiran de dicha revision los estudios que analicen el efecto en las microempresas de paises desarrollados pues no son comparables con los paises en vias de desarrollo.

Asimismo, a raiz de que el presente estudio tiene una naturaleza cuantitativa, se descartan de la revision aquellos estudios que utilicen unicamente un enfoque cualitativo.

Por otro lado, solo se presentan aquellos estudios que consideran que Internet esta dentro del grupo de las TIC a analizar, a pesar de la abundante literatura respecto del uso de los telefonos moviles. Esta restriccion se considera necesaria en la medida en que existen diferencias importantes entre estas tecnologias y las formas en que afectan la productividad.

2.1 Aproximaciones a la relacion entre el uso de Internet y la productividad en Peru

En Peru se han realizado pocos estudios acerca de la relacion entre el uso de Internet y la productividad de las microempresas. Ademas, los estudios que abordan el tema lo hacen desde aproximaciones a variables que miden la productividad de manera indirecta (tales como el ingreso del hogar o el salario laboral), utilizan muestras pequenas o realizan solo estudios exploratorios.

Rodriguez (2008), Tello (2011), De los Rios (2010), y Medina y Fernandez (2011) son las ultimas investigaciones que se han realizado en el Peru respecto del efecto del uso de Internet en variables relacionadas con la productividad, tales como los ingresos, los salarios y la rentabilidad.

Si bien todos estos trabajos encuentran un efecto positivo y significativo, sus principales limitaciones son que las variables utilizadas solo capturan la productividad de forma indirecta. Ademas, la variable de uso de Internet que emplean no distingue entre que tipos de uso se esta haciendo. Es decir, dichos trabajos no toman en cuenta las potenciales diferencias que puede tener el usar Internet para distintas aplicaciones. Esto limita la capacidad de estos estudios de capturar el efecto del servicio.

Kuramoto (2007), Aguero y Perez (2010), y Proexpansion (2005) realizaron estudios exploratorios acerca de la relacion entre el uso de Internet y la productividad de las microempresas en el Peru. A diferencia de los estudios anteriores, estos si toman en cuenta los diferentes tipos de uso de Internet y senalan que es importante considerarlos pues su efecto en la empresa es diferenciado; no obstante, no es posible obtener relaciones de causalidad a partir de sus resultados.

2.2 Aproximaciones en otros paises en vias de desarrollo

Si bien en otros paises en vias de desarrollo se encuentran avances respecto del efecto de Internet en la productividad de las microempresas, es importante senalar que las caracteristicas de las empresas estudiadas en dichos paises pueden tener diferencias significativas con el objeto de estudio de esta investigacion.

Esselaar, Stork, Ndlwalana, y Deen-Swarray (2007); Chowdhury y Wolf (2003); y Amoros, Planellas, y Batista-Foguet (2007) han estudiado, mediante diversas estrategias, el efecto del uso de Internet en la productividad de las microempresas. Amoros et al., en particular, encuentran efecto no en la productividad, pero si en el tamano de la empresa.

Tanto Esselaar et al. (2007) como Chowdhury y Wolf (2003) centran sus analisis en el contexto africano y arriban a resultados mixtos sobre el efecto de las TIC. Asi, Chowdhury y Wolf encuentran que el uso de las TIC no tiene efecto en la rentabilidad de la empresa y tiene un efecto negativo en la productividad. Aunque senalan que quizas esto se deba a que los efectos del uso de estas tecnologias se veran en periodos futuros. Esselaar et al., quienes encuentran un efecto positivo en el uso de las TIC, senalan que los resultados negativos encontrados por Chodwhury y Wolf se deben a malas mediciones de las caracteristicas de las microempresas.

3. Metodologia

La ecuacion (1) resume la relacion que se busca probar en este trabajo:

(1) Productividad = f(Uso de Internet I Variables control) + error

En esta ecuacion existen cuatro elementos importantes para el correcto planteamiento del modelo. Ellos son:

i) La variable dependiente: productividad de la microempresa

ii) La variable de tratamiento: el uso de Internet por parte del empresario

iii) El grupo de variables control: aquellas que se incluyen en el modelo para obtener una mejor medicion del efecto de la variable de tratamiento

iv) El ruido blanco o "termino de error"

Dado que el presente trabajo busca encontrar una relacion de causa-efecto, se ha elegido el enfoque de los resultados potenciales o modelo de causalidad de Rubin-Holland.

En lo relativo a nuestra problematica, dicho enfoque consiste en encontrar un vinculo causal entre la mayor adopcion de Internet por parte de la empresa (en concreto, del microempresario) y una mayor productividad. (9) En palabras mas sencillas, y aplicadas a este caso en particular, nos preguntamos: ?Cual habria sido la productividad si el empresario hubiera usado Internet? (en caso de que no lo hubiese hecho), y viceversa.

La principal razon por la cual se toma este tipo de enfoque es que permite tratar directamente el problema de la endogeneidad que podria existir entre la variable productividad y el uso de Internet. Podria darse, por ejemplo, el escenario en donde un aumento observado de la productividad se deba a factores "no observables", y que este aumento, a su vez, afecte al nivel de adopcion de Internet.

Asi, por ejemplo, un tipo de problema que se busca evitar es que una tercera variable "E" sea la que origine el cambio en la adopcion y, ademas, afecte, simultaneamente, a la productividad. Esto ocasionaria que la relacion observada entre estas variables este sesgada pues se estaria capturando el efecto de "E" y no el efecto del uso de Internet.

Esto es en particular importante dado que la productividad es una variable que depende de la variable no observable "habilidad" (cuyo efecto ha sido ampliamente estudiado en la literatura empirica y se conoce como "ability bias"). Es decir, existe un sesgo positivo hacia la adopcion de Internet y en la productividad de aquellas personas que son mas "habiles" o "inteligentes." (10) La consecuencia de no tomar en cuenta este problema es una incorrecta medicion de la relacion, pudiendo sobreestimar la verdadera relacion causal del uso de Internet sobre la productividad. A continuacion se presenta el modelo econometrico elegido.

3.1 Modelo Econometrico

Se ha elegido trabajar con la metodologia de primeras diferencias (PD). (11) Esto se debe a que la habilidad es una caracteristica individual que no cambia en el tiempo. Al aplicar esta metodologia se evita que el modelo contenga el mencionado sesgo de la habilidad y se obtiene un estimador consistente. (12)

Asi, el modelo en diferencias vendria a estar representado por la ecuacion (2):13

[[DELTA]y.sub.i,t,t-1] = [[beta].sub.0] + [[DELTA]X.sub.i,t,t-1]'[[beta].sub.1] + [X.sub.i,t-1]'[[beta].sub.2] + [y.sub.i,t-1]'[[beta].sub.3] + [[DELTA][epsilon].sub.i,t,t-1], (2)

En donde [y.sub.it] es el vector de observaciones de la productividad de la empresa del individuo i en el periodo t. Naturalmente, la variable [[DELTA]y.sub.i,t,t-1] representa la variacion entre el periodo t y t-1.

[X.sub.it] es la matriz de variables control del modelo (tales como el nivel educativo del empresario y de los trabajadores, la cantidad de mano de obra asalariada, la edad, etc.). A partir de dicha matriz para los periodos se construye la matriz [[DELTA]X.sub.i,t,t-1], que es aquella que contiene las variaciones de la adopcion de Internet por parte de los empresarios y el resto de las variables de control entre los periodos t y t-1; el vector [[beta].sub.1] contiene el vector de coeficientes para dicha matriz. La matriz [[DELTA]X.sub.i,t,t-1] representa los valores rezagados de dicha matriz, es decir, el periodo original respecto del cual se hace la diferencia, y, para esta matriz, el vector [[beta].sub.2] representa sus coeficientes.

El vector [y.sub.it-1] contiene los valores de la variable dependiente en el periodo previo a la diferencia, tambien con el fin de controlar por efectos diferenciados, dependiendo del lugar en que se encuentre, el valor de la variable dependiente en el periodo inicial. El coeficiente [[beta].sub.3] es el estimador del efecto de que existan diferentes niveles iniciales de productividad en la variacion futura de la productividad. (14)

3.2 Base de Datos

Los datos utilizados para el presente estudio provienen de la Encuesta Nacional de Hogares (ENAHO) para el periodo 2007-2010, que cuenta con informacion relevante al rubro economico de las microempresas de cada empresario, tal como: la antiguedad de la empresa, la cantidad de trabajadores, su nivel de preparacion, su experiencia y los gastos de la empresa. Dicha encuesta tambien contiene informacion sobre el uso de Internet del empresario y, ademas, sus caracteristicas socioeconomicas.

La encuesta es de tipo corte transversal, pero contiene una sub-muestra que es de tipo panel de datos. La muestra original de corte transversal esta compuesta por 11.211 observaciones en 2007, 11.047 en 2008, 11.383 en 2009 y 11.378 en el ano 2010. (15)

Dentro del total se tienen 1.994 observaciones de tipo panel para el intervalo de anos 2007-2008, 1.920 para el intervalo 2008-2009 y, por ultimo, 2.020 para el intervalo 2009-2010. Al utilizar estos tres intervalos como un pseudo-panel de diferencias contamos, en total, con 5.920 observaciones formadas por 10.970 observaciones de corte transversal (es decir, aproximadamente el 25 por ciento de la muestra original de cortes transversales).

3.3 Variables del modelo

3.3.1 Variable de resultado

Lastimosamente, no es posible observar la productividad de los trabajadores de la empresa y, ademas, es complicado (si no imposible) calcularla en forma directa. (16) Para el presente trabajo se medira con la variable "proxy" el valor agregado por hora-trabajada promedio dentro de la empresa, que denotareVA mos como: VA/[H.sub.it]

En donde VA es el valor agregado total (en el que se considera tanto la produccion destinada a consumo propio como a ventas), y H es el total de horas trabajadas dentro de la empresa del empresario en el ano t. Usaremos esta variable como un valor aproximado de la productividad por trabajador; sin embargo, a fin de evitar que los resultados puedan ser sesgados en alguna medida por el uso de esta variable proxy, se usaran otras 2 variables (17) para poner a prueba la robustez de los resultados.

3.3.2 Variables control

Dentro del grupo de variables control, haremos una subdivision en cuatro partes: [Z.sub.it],[W.sub.it], [[gamma].sub.t], y [[delta].sub.it].

La matriz [Z.sub.it] contiene 11 variables caracteristicas de la empresa del empresario i para cada periodo t. Estas variables son: los salarios pagados a los trabajadores, la experiencia (o antiguedad) de la empresa, el porcentaje de trabajadores que son familiares del empresario,18 el porcentaje de trabajadores no-asalariados, una variable dicotomica que indica si la empresa se encuentra en una localidad urbana o rural, (19) tres variables dicotomicas que indican en que sector economico se encuentra la empresa (produccion, servicios o comercio) y tres variables dicotomicas que indican la escala de la empresa. (20)

La matriz [W.sub.it] contiene nueve variables relativas a las caracteristicas del empresario y la mano de obra en la empresa i para el periodo t. Dentro de esta matriz se encuentran: la educacion promedio de los trabajadores, (21) dicha educacion al cuadrado, los anos promedio de experiencia de los trabajadores, dicha experiencia al cuadrado, la edad promedio de los trabajadores, dicha edad al cuadrado, si el empresario es o no jefe del hogar, si es o no emprendedor (22) y la lengua materna del empresario. (23)

La matriz [[gamma].sub.t] contiene dos variables dicotomicas usadas para distinguir los intervalos de anos en el modelo para los tres anos de la muestra. (24)

La matriz [[delta].sub.it] contiene las variables dicotomicas que se utilizaron para distinguir la zona geografica en donde se encontraba la empresa del empresario i en el periodo t. Se crearon siete variables dicotomicas para los ocho dominios nacionales. (25)

3.3.3 Variable de interes

La variable de interes "uso o adopcion de Internet" se medira en este trabajo con el "Indice de Lefebvre y Lefebvre" (ILL), el cual mide el grado de adopcion de Internet para cada uno de los empresarios. (26)

A partir de dicha metodologia se plantea la ecuacion (3), en donde se observa que existen ocho aplicaciones de Internet que pueden ser utilizadas por los empresarios. Cada una de estas aplicaciones tiene una ponderacion [p.sub.j], siendo j la variable que indica que aplicacion se muestra en el ponderador. Este puntaje sera mayor para aquellas aplicaciones que sean consideradas de mayor utilidad a fin de mejorar la productividad de las empresas. Asi, la variable A es una variable dicotomica por cada j aplicacion y toma el valor 1 en caso de que el microempresario adopte la tecnologia y 0 en caso de que no lo haga.

Si bien esto nos permite simplificar el objeto de analisis, plantea, a su vez, el problema de determinar que ponderadores utilizar. (27) Para el presente estudio se utilizaron ponderadores ad hoc, especificos para este proyecto. Esto permite evitar los problemas de usar ponderadores de estudios previos que podrian implicar realizar supuestos incorrectos, lo cual hace necesario que los nuevos ponderadores sean designados arbitrariamente dado que no existe un trabajo previo que senale como atribuir estas ponderaciones para el caso peruano.

El valor del indice [ILL.sub.it] sera la suma de las ocho variables dicotomicas ponderadas por su importancia. Entonces, con dicha definicion, la formula de la variable de tratamiento es:

3 [EXPRESION MATEMATICA IRREPRODUCIBLE EN ASCII]

Al designar los ponderadores, necesariamente se esta corriendo el riesgo de ser arbitrarios y sesgados a la hora de su eleccion. Por ello se decide realizar encuestas electronicas a especialistas del sector de las TIC. Los resultados de la estimacion de estos ponderadores se presentan en el siguiente capitulo.

4. Resultados

4.1 El indice de adopcion de Internet

Para el presente trabajo se realizaron entrevistas a especialistas del sector. Entre los meses de setiembre y noviembre de 2010, se elaboro y envio la encuesta electronica a, aproximadamente, 40 potenciales encuestados. Para la seleccion de estos se utilizo la revision bibliografica de este estudio (escogimos solo a aquellos que tuvieran investigaciones aplicadas sobre TIC que involucraran la experiencia peruana), asi como representantes del MTC (el ministerio encargado de la cartera de telecomunicaciones), de OSIPTEL (el organismo regulador de telecomunicaciones) y de una empresa consultora en temas vinculados con las telecomunicaciones cuyo enfoque fuera, principalmente, economico.

En total se obtuvo la respuesta de 10 encuestas; dentro de los encuestados se encuentran profesionales investigadores del efecto de las TIC en la economia y la sociedad, consultores en telecomunicaciones que asesoran a organismos publicos y privados, y funcionarios del MTC y de OSIPTEL. El resumen de estas encuestas se presenta en el Anexo 1. (28)

El Grafico 2 es un grafico de cajas (en donde se presentan la respuesta maxima, la minima, la mediana y la media de las respuestas) en el que podemos ver que las aplicaciones "obtener informacion" y "comunicarse" son las que los especialistas senalan como las mas importantes a fin de mejorar la productividad de las microempresas. Esto es consistente con la literatura teorica y empirica, que senala que son estas dos actividades de uso de Internet las que mayor potencial tienen para mejorar la productividad.

Existe una marcada variabilidad de las respuestas, que se puede observar en el Anexo 1 y el Cuadro 1, pues se observa que la media esta sesgada hacia los valores extremos de la encuesta. Es por esto que se elige trabajar con la mediana. La lista con los ponderadores elegidos se presenta en el Cuadro 2. Otro aspecto que se observa en dicho cuadro es que, con el fin de simplificar la interpretacion de los coeficientes, se estandarizan los ponderadores obtenidos de tal forma que pertenezcan al intervalo 0-100 y no al 0-35.

4.2 Resultados econometricos

El cuadro 3 presenta los resultados del modelo de PD. La primera columna de resultados presenta el valor del coeficiente del efecto de una variacion en el uso de Internet por parte del empresario, controlado, ademas, por las dummies de [[gamma].sub.t], que controlan por periodo temporal del pool de datos. En la segunda columna se incluyen, ademas, las variaciones de las variables control de la matriz Z(caracteristicas de la empresa). La tercera columna presenta los resultados al incluir al modelo de la columna 1 unicamente las variaciones de las variables de la matriz W (caracteristicas del empresario y de la mano de obra). La cuarta columna presenta los resultados con la inclusion de ambos grupos de variables (Z y W). Finalmente, la quinta columna presenta los resultados del modelo con la inclusion de ambas matrices (Z y W) y, ademas, variables control geograficas de la matriz [[delta].sub.it]. (29)

Se observa que el coeficiente de la variacion de la adopcion del empresario esta altamente correlacionado con la variacion de la productividad de su empresa en el mismo periodo. Se observa, ademas, que este coeficiente es relativamente constante pues esta entre los valores 0,044 y 0,040, lo que muestra que la inclusion de variables control si afecta al estimador, aunque no lo hace de manera significativa.

Esto nos da una primera medida de robustez de nuestro estimador y, ademas, nos muestra que la inclusion de una mayor cantidad de variables control probablemente no tenga un efecto significativo en los resultados obtenidos.

La interpretacion del coeficiente es la siguiente: Por cada punto que se incremente, en un mismo intervalo de tiempo, el indice de adopcion ILL, el valor agregado por hora trabajada se incrementa en, aproximadamente, 0.04 PEN, (30) si se mantienen constantes las otras variables. Al comparar este valor con la media de productividad de la muestra se observa que es equivalente a un incremento del 1,5% del total. Es decir, cada incremento de un punto en el indice ILL tiene un efecto promedio similar al 1,5% de la productividad promedio de las microempresas de la muestra.

Si bien este valor puede parecer modesto en una primera mirada, es necesario hacer una breve acotacion al estimador basandonos en la tabla de ponderadores y, ademas, multiplicando dicho valor por el numero de horas trabajadas. El cuadro 4 presenta un cuadro de conversiones que serviran para este fin. Sin embargo, es importante aclarar que este cuadro muestra informacion referencial, pues los "efectos potenciales" mostrados en dicha tabla no han sido directamente estimados en una regresion sino que, a partir de los valores obtenidos de las encuestas, se trata de "reconstruir" el efecto que tendria cada una de estas aplicaciones.

El objetivo del Cuadro 4 es brindar informacion mas facil de comprender respecto del efecto de Internet. Asi, al reconstruir las aplicaciones con las cuales se creo el indice, es posible mostrar el "efecto potencial" de cada una de las aplicaciones, aunque bajo el supuesto de que el coeficiente no varia al tratarse la aplicacion por separado.

En la primera y segunda columnas de dicho cuadro se presentan las aplicaciones y sus ponderadores estandarizados para cada aplicacion, respectivamente. La tercera columna muestra el efecto de cada una de estas aplicaciones sobre el Valor Agregado por hora trabajada en la empresa. Finalmente, la cuarta columna presenta el efecto potencial como un porcentaje de la productividad promedio de la muestra.

Asi, se observa, por ejemplo, que, como la aplicacion de usar Internet para comunicarse tiene un ponderador de 18,57, se debe entender que el uso de esta aplicacion mejora la productividad en ese numero multiplicado por el coeficiente estimado (dado que este mide el efecto del aumento de un punto en el indice).

Es decir, esta aplicacion tiene el efecto potencial de incrementar la productividad en 0,74 PEN en el valor agregado por hora trabajada. Este ejercicio se puede realizar, a su vez, respecto de todas las aplicaciones. Los efectos potenciales, entonces, si mostrarian ser importantes pues la productividad promedio de las empresas fue de 2,5 y 3,18 PEN entre los anos 2007 y 2010, respectivamente. Asimismo, tal como se puede ver en la cuarta columna, la magnitud relativa del uso de una de estas aplicaciones varia entre 8,6% (para el caso de la aplicacion "entretenimiento") y 28% para las aplicaciones "obtener informacion" y "comunicarse."

4.3 Medidas de robustez de los resultados

Por otra parte, como una forma de validacion de la eleccion de la metodologia de PD, se estimo un modelo de minimos cuadrados entre el uso de Internet del empresario y la productividad. A traves de este modelo se obtiene un coeficiente superior al estimado con el modelo de PD, lo cual sustenta lo planteado en el capitulo anterior respecto del problema de endogeneidad entre ambas variables ocasionada por el "sesgo de habilidad" que, de no haber sido corregido, nos habria hecho sobreestimar el efecto. (31)

Por otra parte, el potencial problema de que los resultados de la presente estimacion esten sesgados, de alguna forma, por la eleccion de la variable resultado se soluciona al implementar el mismo modelo con otras dos variables proxies alternativas de la pro ductividad de la empresa. (32) Los resultados son igual de significativos en terminos estadisticos. Con esto se tiene evidencia de que los resultados obtenidos previamente con la variable "valor agregado por hora trabajada" son confiables, y que la metodologia aplicada fue adecuada.

5. Conclusiones

El presente trabajo busco comprobar la hipotesis de que un mayor uso de Internet por parte del empresario ocasiona una mayor productividad en su microempresa. Para esto se utilizo una muestra de microempresarios del Peru para los anos 20072010.

Pese a que existen investigaciones previas que han abordado la importancia de las TIC para las pequenas empresas, no existen estudios previos adecuados en Peru que analicen directamente el efecto del uso de Internet en la productividad de las microempresas. Aquellos que lo intentan no logran demostrar que sus resultados pueden ser interpretados como de causa-efecto. A fin de llenar este vacio, el presente estudio busca estimar la relacion causal entre el uso de Internet y la productividad.

Para esto se construyo un indice de adopcion de Internet a partir de la metodologia de Lefebvre y Lefebvre (1996). Esta variable ha permitido tener una mejor comprension del potencial de Internet para mejorar la productividad. (33)

A partir de dicho indice se calculo el efecto del uso de Internet en la productividad mediante la metodologia de primeras diferencias (PD). Los resultados senalan que el efecto de mejorar en un punto el indice ILL mejora la productividad de la empresa (aproximada como el valor agregado por hora trabajada) en 0,04 Nuevos Soles. (34) A pesar de que en una primera observacion el efecto puede parecer modesto, se debe tener en cuenta que el indice se encuentra en el intervalo 0-100. Es decir, es posible incrementarlo hasta en 100 unidades. En tal sentido, el efecto es significativo al compararlo con el promedio de la productividad de la muestra, de 2,7 Nuevos Soles por hora trabajada. Aproximadamente, cada incremento en el indice tiene un efecto equivalente al 1,5% de la productividad promedio de la muestra.

Se sugiere, a partir de lo observado en este estudio, disenar politicas que busquen favorecer e incrementar el uso de Internet por parte de los microempresarios. Asimismo, es importante realizar mas investigaciones en torno a las particularidades que puede tener el efecto en distintos sectores y en distintos contextos empresariales.

ANEXO 1

[GRAFICO 2 OMITIR]

ANEXO 2
Cuadro 5. Resultados Completos del Modelo PD para la
Muestra en Diferencias.

Variable Dependiente: Primera Diferencia en el Valor
agregado por hora trabajada

Variables Independientes                     (1)          (2)

Primera Diferencia en el indice de           0,044 ***    0,044 ***
adopcion de Internet-ILL                     (3,658)      (3,756)
(t-stat)
Valor rezagado del indice de adopcion        0,243 ***    0,235 ***

Valor rezagado de la variable dependiente    -0,786 ***   - 0,77 ***

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    0,057        0,063
en el intervalo temporal 2008-2009 (b)

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    0,401        0,446 *
en el intervalo temporal 2009-2010 (b)

Variacion anual de los salarios pagados                   0,365 ***
por hora trabajada

Variacion en la antiguedad de la empresa                  -0,026 *

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano                 1,529 *
de obra familiar dentro de la empresa

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano                 3,946 ***
de obra no remunerada dentro de la
empresa

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      -0,855 **
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Produccion

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      0,278
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Servicios

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      -0,846
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Comercio

Variable dicotomica que senala si la                      -0,980 ***
empresa tiene entre uno y cinco
trabajadores (c)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la                      - 1,36 ***
empresa tiene mas de cinco trabajadoresc

Variacion anual de la educacion promedio
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la
educacion promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual de la experiencia
promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la
experiencia promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio de la edad
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio del
cuadrado de la edad de la mano de obra

Variable dicotomica que senala si el
empresario es jefe de hogar en el
intervalo de observacion

Variable dicotomica que senala si el
empresario es emprendedor
(1 en caso de que lo sea)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio Costa Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio Selva (d)

Constante (t-stat)                           2.913 ***    2.880 ***
                                             (13.96)      (13.50)
Observaciones                                5,925        5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.341        0.352

Variables Independientes                     (3)          (4)

Primera Diferencia en el indice de           0,044 ***    0,044 ***
adopcion de Internet-ILL                     (3,681)      (3,766)
(t-stat)
Valor rezagado del indice de adopcion        0,243 ***    0,140 ***

Valor rezagado de la variable dependiente    -0,783 ***   -0,773 ***

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    -0,133       0,039
en el intervalo temporal 2008-2009 (b)

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    0,315        0,436
en el intervalo temporal 2009-2010 (b)

Variacion anual de los salarios pagados                   0,372 ***
por hora trabajada

Variacion en la antiguedad de la empresa                  0,026

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano                 1,276 *
de obra familiar dentro de la empresa

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano                 3,651 ***
de obra no remunerada dentro de la
empresa

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      -0,839 **
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Produccion

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      0,249
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Servicios

Variable dicotomica que senala si se                      -0,847
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Comercio

Variable dicotomica que senala si la                      - 1,024 ***
empresa tiene entre uno y cinco
trabajadores (c)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la                      -1,367 ***
empresa tiene mas de cinco trabajadoresc

Variacion anual de la educacion promedio     -0,093       -0,054
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la           0,007        0,003
educacion promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual de la experiencia            -0,073 *     -0,105 **
promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la           0,001 *      0,001 *
experiencia promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio de la edad      0,029        0,015
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio del             0,000        -0,000
cuadrado de la edad de la mano de obra

Variable dicotomica que senala si el         0,553        0,525
empresario es jefe de hogar en el
intervalo de observacion

Variable dicotomica que senala si el         0,093        0,069
empresario es emprendedor
(1 en caso de que lo sea)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio Costa Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la
empresa pertenece al dominio Selva (d)

Constante (t-stat)                           2.976 ***    2.886 ***
                                             (13.51)      (12.94)
Observaciones                                5,925        5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.343        0.352

Variables Independientes                     (5)

Primera Diferencia en el indice de           0,040 ***
adopcion de Internet-ILL                     (3,521)
(t-stat)
Valor rezagado del indice de adopcion        0,218 ***

Valor rezagado de la variable dependiente    -0,778 ***

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    0,046
en el intervalo temporal 2008-2009 (b)

Variable dicotomica que senala si se esta    0,444
en el intervalo temporal 2009-2010 (b)

Variacion anual de los salarios pagados      0,373 ***
por hora trabajada

Variacion en la antiguedad de la empresa     0,028

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano    1,292 *
de obra familiar dentro de la empresa

Variacion anual del porcentaje de la mano    3,679 ***
de obra no remunerada dentro de la
empresa

Variable dicotomica que senala si se         -0,795 **
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Produccion

Variable dicotomica que senala si se         0,269
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Servicios

Variable dicotomica que senala si se         -0,849
trabaja en el rubro o sector de Comercio

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -1,016 ***
empresa tiene entre uno y cinco
trabajadores (c)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -1,367 ***
empresa tiene mas de cinco trabajadoresc

Variacion anual de la educacion promedio     -0,063
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la           0,003
educacion promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual de la experiencia            -0,106 **
promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del cuadrado de la           0,001 *
experiencia promedio de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio de la edad      0,016
de la mano de obra

Variacion anual del promedio del             -0,000
cuadrado de la edad de la mano de obra

Variable dicotomica que senala si el         0,527
empresario es jefe de hogar en el
intervalo de observacion

Variable dicotomica que senala si el         0,069
empresario es emprendedor
(1 en caso de que lo sea)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         - 1,233 ***
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         - 1,017 ***
empresa pertenece al dominio
Costa Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -0,464
empresa pertenece al dominio Costa Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -1,245 *
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Norte (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -0,676 *
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Centro (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -0,582 *
empresa pertenece al dominio
Sierra Sur (d)

Variable dicotomica que senala si la         -0,790 *
empresa pertenece al dominio Selva (d)

Constante (t-stat)                           2.980 ***
                                             (8.194)
Observaciones                                5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.354

Nota: ***p < 0,01; **p < 0,05; y *p < 0.1.

(a) Las variables del modelo presentado en la seccion metodologia:
"variable dicotomica que senala si la empresa se encuentra en una
localidad urbana o rural" y "variable dicotomica que senala si el
empresario tiene una lengua materna indigena" no se incluyeron en
el cuadro de resultados pues no presentan variacion temporal, por
lo que no tienen efecto en la variable dependiente.

(b) La variable dicotomica que senala si se esta en el intervalo
2007-2008 no fue incluida para evitar el problema de perfecta
colinealidad.

(c) La variable dicotomica que senala si la empresa es de un solo
trabajador independiente no fue incluida para evitar el problema de
perfecta colinealidad.

(d) La variable dicotomica que senala si la empresa pertenece al
dominio Lima Metropolitana no fue incluida para evitar el problema
de perfecta colinealidad.


Bibliografia

Aguero, A., & Perez, P. (2010). El uso de Internet de los trabajadores independientes y microempresarios en el Peru. Investigacion presentada en la Conferencia ACORN-REDECOM 2010 realizada en Brasilia, Brasil.

Aker, J. (2008). Does digital divide or provide? The Impact of Cell Phones on Grain Markets in Niger. BREAD Working Paper 177.

Amoros, J., Planellas, M., & Batista-Foguet, J. (2007). Does Internet technology improve perfor mance in small and medium enterprises? Evidence from selected Mexican firms. Academia, Revista Latinoamericana de Administracion, 39, 71-91.

Angrist, J., & Pischke, J. (2009). Mostly harmless econometrics: An empiricist companion. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Chacaltana, J. (2008). Una evaluacion del regimen laboral especial para la microempresa en Peru, al cuarto ano de vigencia. Informe preparado por encargo de la OIT.

Chowdhury, S. K., & Wolf, S. (2003). Use of ICTs and economic performance of SMEs in East Africa. Helsinki: World Institute for Development Economics Research-United Nations University.

Comision Economica para America Latina y el Caribe. (2008). La sociedad de la informacion en America Latina y el Caribe: Desarrollo de las tecnologias y tecnologias para el desarrollo. Santiago de Chile: CEPAL.

De Los Rios, C. (2010). Impacto del uso de Internet en el Bienestar de los Hogares Peruanos: Evidencia de un panel de hogares 2007-2009. Lima: DIRSI.

Dinardo, J., & Pischke, J. (1997). The returns to computer use revisited: Have pencils changed the wage structure too? The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112(1), 291-303.

Esselaar, S., Stork, C., Ndlwalana, A., & Deen-Swarray, M. (2007). ICT usage and its impact on profitability of SMEs in 13 African countries. Information Technologies & International Development, 4(1), 87-100.

Gi-Soon, S. (2005). The impact of information and communication technologies (ICTs) on rural households: A holistic approach applied to the case of Lao People's Democratic Republic. Jakarta: UNV/UNDP.

Holland, P. (1986). Statistics and causal inference. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 81(396), 945-960.

International Telecomunication Union (ITU). (2011). Measuring the information society. Geneva: ITU.

Jensen, R. (2007) The digital provide: Information (technology), market performance and welfare in the South India fisheries sector. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 122(3), 879-924.

Katz, R. (2009). El papel de las TICs en el desarrollo. Propuesta de America Latina a los retos economicos actuales. Madrid: Fundacion Telefonica.

Kuramoto, J. (2007). TICs, MIPYMEs y genero en el Peru: Una primera aproximacion. Proyecto GATE, Oficina de la Mujer en el Desarrollo, Orden de Trabajo No. 2, USAID Peru.

Lefebvre, E., & Lefebvre, L. (1996). Information and telecommunication technologies. The impact of their adoption on small and medium-sized enterprises. Ottawa: IDRC.

Medina, P., & Fernandez, R. (2011). Evaluacion del Impacto del acceso a las TIC sobre el ingreso de los hogares. Una aproximacion a partir de la metodologia del Propensity Score Matching y datos de panel para el caso peruano. Lima: DIRSI.

Monge, R., Alfaro, C., & Alfaro, J. (2005). Las TICs en las pymes de Centroamerica. Ottawa: IDRC.

Proexpansion. (2005.) Identificacion de necesidades de las MYPE con respecto a las tecnologias de la informacion y comunicaciones (TIC). Lima: PromPYME.

Rodriguez, E. (2008). La "brecha digital" en el mercado de trabajo: El aprovechamiento de la Internet como determinante de la desigualdad salarial. Lima: CIES.

Rubin, D. (1974). Estimating causal effects of treatments in randomized and nonrandomized studies. Journal of Educational Psychology, 66(5), 688-701.

Tello, M. (2011). Science and technology, ICT and profitability in the manufacturing sector in Peru. En M. Balboni, M. Rovira, & S. Vergara, S. (Eds.), ICT in Latin America: A microdata analysis. Santiago de Chile: CEPAL-IDRC.

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). (2011). Information economy report 2011. Geneva: United Nations.

Villaran, F. (2007). El mundo de la pequena empresa. Lima: Mincetur.

White, H. (1980). A heteroscedasticity-consistent covariance matrix estimator and a direct test for heteroscedasticity. Econometrica, 48, 817-838.

Woolridge, J. (2002). Econometric analysis of cross section and panel data. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

World Economic Forum. (2011). The global information technology report 2010-2011. Geneva: WEF.

Cesar Huaroto (1)

chuaroto@iep.org.pe

Investigador Asistente

Instituto de Estudios Peruanos

Av. Horacio Urteaga 694

Lima

Peru

(1.) Muchas personas han colaborado en la culminacion de este documento de diversas maneras. A todos ellos, mis mas sinceros agradecimientos. Quiero agradecer, especialmente, a Roxana Barrantes Caceres, Fatima Ponce y Aileen Aguero, cuyos comentarios, realizados en distintas etapas de la investigacion, me han resultado invalorables para la continua mejora de esta investigacion. En especial, me gustaria hacer mencion a los multiples comentarios que recibi durante mi pasantia en el Instituto de Estudios Peruanos en el marco del programa "Dialogo Regional para la Sociedad de la Informacion." Por otra parte, las personas que accedieron a brindarme informacion por via electronica han realizado un aporte fundamental a este trabajo; a ellos tambien extiendo mis mas sentidos agradecimientos. No puedo dejar de agradecer, por otro lado, los valiosos comentarios recibidos por parte de los participantes, asistentes y comentaristas de la "VI Conferencia ACORN-REDECOM," realizada en Valparaiso, Chile; el "I Taller de Investigacion Economica Aplicada," organizado por el CIES; el "XXIX Encuentro de Economistas," organizado por el Banco Central de Reserva del Peru (BCR) y el "IV Coloquio de Estudiantes de Economia," organizado por la Especialidad de Economia de la Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru. Asimismo, los comentarios recibidos por distintos investigadores dentro del IEP y colegas de la especialidad de Economia de la PUCP me han servido para enriquecer el presente estudio. Los errores que persisten son de mi entera responsabilidad.

(2.) Agradezco el apoyo economico que recibi para realizar esta investigacion por parte del Consorcio de Investigacion Economica y Social (CIES) en el marco del XII Concurso Nacional de Investigacion. Agradezco, ademas, al Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP) por el respaldo institucional brindado para este proyecto.

(3.) Una microempresa es aquella que cuenta con menos de 10 trabajadores, incluidos los trabajadores independientes y sin considerar a los trabajadores del hogar ni a los agricultores. Esta definicion es la usual en los trabajos sobre microempresas en el pais. Ver, por ejemplo, Villaran (2007) yChacaltana (2008).

(4.) Chacaltana (2008) y Villaran (2007).

(5.) Para una discusion mas detallada de este enfoque ver: Angrist y Pischke (2009). Tambien es recomendable ver los articulos seminales de Rubin (1974) y Holland (1986).

(6.) Al respecto, aunque el problema de la endogeneidad se explicara con mayor detalle en la seccion "Metodologia," es importante adelantar que el principal efecto de esta es que impide una interpretacion causal de los resultados debido a que la decision de usar o no Internet depende de caracteristicas individuales como la "habilidad" (que en la literatura tiene un efecto conocido como "ability bias").

(7.) El tipo de cambio entre los dolares estadounidenses (USD) y los nuevos soles peruanos (PEN) es 2.63. Entonces, en este caso, el efecto de 0.04 PEN por hora trabajada es equivalente a 0.015 USD por hora trabajada.

(8.) Otros autores han arribado a conclusiones similares desde la teoria microeconomica, vinculandola, en particular, con la mentalidad de las microempresas. Aker (2008) y Jensen (2007) plantean que la principal ventaja de las TIC es que facilitan pequenas decisiones que son cruciales para los microempresarios.

(9.) Para un mayor detalle sobre la naturaleza de este modelo ver el capitulo introductorio de Angrist y Pishcke (2009), cuya nomenclatura es utilizada en el presente trabajo.

(10.) Aunque el termino habilidad tiene multiples interpretaciones, se puede decir que las personas "habiles" tienen ventajas de aprendizaje de nuevas tecnologias, sienten mayor curiosidad por aprenderlas o identifican de manera mas rapida las ventajas competitivas de adoptarlas y, por otra parte, estas personas son, ademas, las mas productivas. Existe una amplia literatura que discute los efectos y la naturaleza del "ability bias," pero se centra, principalmente, en las estimaciones del retorno de la educacion mas no en el contexto particular del uso de Internet. Sin embargo, el trabajo de DiNardo y Pischke (1997), quienes analizan el problema del "ability bias" en el caso del efecto del uso de computadoras en los salarios de los trabajadores, es el trabajo que mas se asemeja al de esta investigacion y, tal como en este estudio, se discute el problema de la endogeneidad existente dentro de la relacion entre productividad y uso de la TIC.

(11.) Para una fundamentacion matematica de como el modelo de PD soluciona el problema de variables "no-observables" ver: Woolridge (2002), pp. 279-284.

(12.) Existe otro posible problema de endogeneidad, conocido como "causalidad simultanea" o "bicausalidad," que consiste en la ocurrencia de ambos efectos causales en un mismo momento. La unica forma de afrontarlos es mediante el uso de algun metodo experimental o del metodo de Variables Instrumentales (IV), pero esto requiere la existencia de algun "instrumento" exogeno que "asigne" aleatoriamente el uso de Internet y, de esta forma, el efecto estimado podria saberse en una sola direccion. En este caso, lastimosamente, no se cuenta con dicho instrumento por lo que es preferible no utilizar dicha metodologia pues los resultados pueden contener un sesgo aun mayor. (Ver, para mayor detalle: Angrist y Pischke, 2009.)

(13.) Es importante notar que se incluyen, ademas, los niveles de las variables en el periodo anterior puesto que, segun Wooldridge (2002, p. 284), en caso de que la diferencia este relacionada con valores rezagados, es recomendable incluir dichos valores en la regresion.

(14.) Es importante senalar, ademas, que el modelo PD sera estimado mediante el uso de la metodologia de Minimos Cuadrados, corregido con la matriz de varianza-covarianza de White, que permite evitar el potencial problema de heterocedasticidad entre las variables del modelo. Para un mayor detalle sobre el problema de heterocedasticidad, ver: White (1980).

(15.) Cabe mencionar que, para el presente trabajo, se tomaran en cuenta unicamente aquellos microempresarios que senalen que la empresa es su actividad principal. Esto se debe a que aquellos que la tienen como actividad secundaria no son comparables como aquellos para quienes, en cierta forma, esta actividad constituye su principal fuente de ingresos.

(16.) La productividad es una variable no-observable directamente; no es constante en el tiempo y es dificil de identificar si la productividad de los trabajadores es una variable homogenea dentro de una empresa y, mas aun, entre distintas empresas.

(17.) Las otras variables seran: el valor bruto por hora trabajada (VBPxh) y la rentabilidad total por hora trabajada (RTxht). Esto se volvera a discutir en la seccion "Resultados." Sin embargo, por razones de espacio, no se incluiran los resultados de estas dos variables.

(18.) Es importante senalar que todas las variables "porcentaje" y "promedio" fueron ponderadas por el numero de horas que trabajo cada empleado dentro de la empresa.

(19.) Para la definicion de rural se utilizo una variable dicotomica que toma el valor 1 cuando es urbano (es decir, si la empresa se ubica en un centro poblado con 4.000 habitantes o mas) y 0 cuando es rural (cuando la empresa se ubica en un centro poblado con menos de 4.000 habitantes).

(20.) La primera senalara si se trata de un trabajador independiente; la segunda, si tiene entre uno y cinco trabajadores y, por ultimo, la tercera senalara si el empresario tiene mas de cinco trabajadores.

(21.) Aproximamos esta variable al usar los anos de escolaridad promedio de los trabajadores.

(22.) Esta variable es dicotomica y otorga el valor "1" a aquellos empresarios que mencionaron en la encuesta que iniciaron la empresa debido a que esta es mas rentable que un puesto dependiente o que prefieren ser independientes. A las demas respuestas, como falta de oportunidades, obligacion, apoyo a un familiar, se les asigno "0." Esta definicion nos permitio distinguir entre aquellas microempresas de supervivencia (o no emprendedoras) y las microempresas que si nacieron como una decision de conveniencia (es decir, empresas que nacieron fruto del esfuerzo de un empresario emprendedor).

(23.) Medida como una variable dummy que toma el valor "1" cuando la lengua materna del empresario es el espanol u otra lengua no indigena (es decir, no quechua ni aimara).

(24.) Es decir, se incluyen tres variables dicotomicas que toma el valor de "1" cuando la observacion se encuentra en alguno de los siguientes tres intervalos: 2007-2008, 2008-2009, o 2009-2010. Esto con el fin de controlar por variaciones que se den a lo largo de todas las observaciones de un mismo intervalo yque sean de caracter generalizado (por ejemplo, el nivel de crecimiento de la economia, la inflacion, etc.).

(25.) La ENAHO los subdivide en ocho dominios: Costa Norte, Costa Centro, Costa Sur, Sierra Norte, Sierra Centro, Sierra Sur, Selva, y Lima Metropolitana.

(26.) Este indice fue planteado por Lefebvre y Lefebvre (1996) y aplicado posteriormente por Monge, Alfaro y Alfaro (2005) para el caso de Centroamerica.

(27.) Esto es particularmente importante debido a que es poco recomendable utilizar ponderadores de estudios previos (tal como senalan Lefebvre y Lefebvre, 1996, y Monge et al., 2005), pues se corre el riesgo de estar asumiendo que la realidad peruana es similar a la de otros paises y, mas importante aun, que los ponderadores de aquella epoca siguen estando vigentes hoy (naturalmente, esto es muy improbable debido al dinamismo del sector).

(28.) No obstante, si bien la cantidad de 10 encuestados puede generar cuestionamientos sobre su representatividad, es importante senalar que, dada su naturaleza voluntaria, no fue posible. recibir una mayor cantidad de respuestas en el tiempo necesario para culminar el estudio. Ademas, la distribucion de las respuestas fue satisfactoria, siendo cinco provenientes de la academia, dos del sector publico (MTC o OSIPTEL) y tres de la empresa consultora. Ademas, es importante remarcar que los encuestados son reconocidos por tener experiencia en mas de uno de estos tres sectores.

Asimismo, con esta encuesta no se buscaba que hubiera una representatividad del tipo que se requiere para encuestas de hogares, sino se buscaba conseguir un minimo de variabilidad en las respuestas y que hubiera representantes de los sectores publico, privado y academico a fin de evitar que los ponderadores asignados contengan algun tipo de sesgo. Naturalmente, se reconoce que los resultados podrian contener algun sesgo, pero que este es, muy probablemente, menor al que se tendria en caso de que se hubieran utilizado ponderadores propios o los ponderadores de estudios previos.

Por otro lado, las ponderaciones tienen un rol secundario pues, sin importar el valor de las ponderaciones, la hipotesis de un efecto positivo se validara con cualquier conjunto de ponderadores que posean valores superiores a cero. Esto se debe a que las correlaciones existiran mas alla del valor de los ponderadores.

(29.) Para ver los resultados completos ver la tabla en el Anexo 2.

(30.) Es importante recordar, en este punto, que 0.04 PEN es equivalente a 0.015 USD. Como se menciono en la seccion introduccion.

(31.) Estos resultados no se muestran por razones de espacio.

(32.) Las dos variables proxies de productividad alternativas fueron: valor bruto de produccion por hora trabajada y rentabilidad total por hora trabajada. Estos resultados no se muestran en el documento por razones de espacio.

(33.) Este indice se construyo con la colaboracion de un grupo de funcionarios publicos y miembros de la academia y del sector privado, quienes colaboraron mediante encuestas electronicas.

(34.) Los resultados muestran ser estadisticamente significativos y robustos al cambio de especificacion del modelo y al cambio en la variable de resultado. Para mayor detalle ver la seccion anterior.
Cuadro 1. Estadisticos a partir de las Encuestas Electronicas.

Aplicacion de Internet           Minimo   Maximo   Promedio   Mediana

Obtener informacion              3,5      7        6,15       6,5
Comunicarse (via e-mail,         3,5      7        6,15       6,5
chat, etc.)

Comprar productos o              2        7        4,8        5
adquirir servicios

Operaciones en banca             2        7        5,05       5,5
electronica y/u otros
servicios financieros

Obtener educacion formal         1        6,5      4,35       4,5
y/o realizar o participar
en actividades de capacitacion

Realizar transacciones           2        7        4,8        5
con organismos estatales
o autoridades publicas

Entretenimiento (juegos          0        7        2,45       2
de video, ver peliculas
o escuchar musica)

Cuadro 2. Ponderadores del Indice de Adopcion.

Aplicaciones                     Ponderadores    Ponderadores del
                                 indice ILL      indice
                                 (0-35)          Estandarizados
                                                 (0-100)

Obtener informacion              6,5             18,57

Comunicarse (via                 6,5             18,57
e-mail, chat, etc.)

Comprar productos                5               14,29
o adquirir servicios

Operaciones en                   5,5             15,71
banca electronica y/u
otros servicios financieros

Obtener educacion formal         4,5             12,86
y/o realizar o participar
en actividades de capacitacion

Realizar transacciones           5               14,29
con organismos estatales
(o interactuar con ellos)
o autoridades publicas

Entretenimiento (juegos          2               5,71
de video, ver peliculas
o escuchar musica)

Total                            35              100

Cuadro 3. Resultados del Modelo en Primeras Diferencias (PD).

Variable Dependiente: Variacion anual del Valor agregado
por hora trabajada

Variables Independientes                     (1)          (2)
Variacion del indice de adopcion de          0.044 ***    0.044 ***
Internet-ILL                                 (3.09)       (3.08)
Var. Controles de efectos escala y por       Si           Si
Pseudo-Panel (1)
Controles por caracteristicas de la                       Si
empresa (Matriz Z)
Controles por Caracteristicas del
empresario y de la mano de obra (Matriz W)
Controles por dominio
geografco y lengua materna (Matriz Delta)

Constante                                    1.528 ***    1.525 ***
                                             (10.00)      (9.82)

Observaciones                                5,925        5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.453        0.461

Variables Independientes                     (3)          (4)
Variacion del indice de adopcion de          0.044 ***    0.044 ***
Internet-ILL                                 (3.11)       (3.08)
Var. Controles de efectos escala y por       Si           Si
Pseudo-Panel (1)
Controles por caracteristicas de la                       Si
empresa (Matriz Z)
Controles por Caracteristicas del            Si           Si
empresario y de la mano de obra (Matriz W)
Controles por dominio
geografco y lengua materna (Matriz Delta)

Constante                                    1.569 ***    1.531 ***
                                             (9.41)       (9.05)

Observaciones                                5,925        5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.453        0.461

Variables Independientes                     (5)
Variacion del indice de adopcion de          0.040 ***
Internet-ILL                                 (2.80)
Var. Controles de efectos escala y por       Si
Pseudo-Panel (1)
Controles por caracteristicas de la          Si
empresa (Matriz Z)
Controles por Caracteristicas del            Si
empresario y de la mano de obra (Matriz W)
Controles por dominio                        Si
geografco y lengua materna (Matriz Delta)

Constante                                    1.952 ***
                                             (5.95)

Observaciones                                5,925
R2-Ajustado                                  0.464

Nota: *** p < 0,01; ** p < 0,05; y * p < 0,1. El valor entre
parentesis representa el valor del estadistico
t-student del coeficiente estimado.

(1) Entre las variables de control por escala se incluyen:
El valor agregado por hora trabajada en el periodo inicial
y el Nivel de adopcion de Internet en el periodo original.

Cuadro 4. Tabla de Conversion de Resultados.

Valor coeficiente estimado en el modelo PD

Efecto estimado de incrementar en un punto el indice como    1,5%
porcentaje de la productividad promedio de la muestra **

                                                  "Efecto Potencial"
                                                  de cada aplicacion
                                 Ponderadores     en el valor
Aplicaciones                     estandarizados   agregado por hora
                                                  trabajada (Soles)

Obtener informacion              18,57            0,74
Comunicarse (via                 18,57            0,74
e-mail, chat, etc.)

Comprar productos                14,29            0,57
o adquirir servicios

Operaciones en banca             15,71            0,63
electronica y/u otros
servicios fnancieros

Obtener educacion formal         12,86            0,51
y/o realizar o participar
en actividades de capacitacion

Realizar transacciones con       14,29            0,57
organismos estatales
(o interactuar con ellos)
o autoridades publicas

Entretenimiento (juegos de       5,71             0,23
video, ver peliculas
o escuchar musica)

                                 "Efecto Potencial"
                                 de cada aplicacion
                                 como%dela productividad
Aplicaciones                     promedio de la muestra **

Obtener informacion              27,9%
Comunicarse (via                 27,9%
e-mail, chat, etc.)

Comprar productos                21,4%
o adquirir servicios

Operaciones en banca             23,6%
electronica y/u otros
servicios fnancieros

Obtener educacion formal         19,3%
y/o realizar o participar
en actividades de capacitacion

Realizar transacciones con       21,4%
organismos estatales
(o interactuar con ellos)
o autoridades publicas

Entretenimiento (juegos de       8,6%
video, ver peliculas
o escuchar musica)

Nota: ** Se utiliza la media de la productividad de la muestra
2,65 nuevos soles por hora trabajada para calcular este porcentaje.
COPYRIGHT 2012 University of Southern California, Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, Annenberg Press
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2012 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Research Article/Articulo de Investigacion
Author:Huaroto, Cesar
Publication:Information Technologies & International Development
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:3PERU
Date:Dec 22, 2012
Words:19437
Previous Article:The impacts of the use of mobile telephone technology on the productivity of micro- and small enterprises: an exploratory study into the carpentry...
Next Article:One laptop per child and bridging the digital divide: the case of plan CEIBAL in Uruguay/ Proyectos 1 a 1 y reduccion de la brecha digital: el caso...
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters