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Upgrading older calenders.

Why upgrade?

Some of the reasons for upgrading rather than replacing an older calender, or purchasing a used calender and upgrading it, rather than purchasing a new calendar, include:

* Reduced cost. Upgrading an older calender can result in a machine whose capabilities are substantially equivalent to those of a new calender.

* Addressing specific shortcomings in an otherwise satisfactory calender. Upgrading can be targeted at providing enhancements to permit running specific products, extend the range of products which can be produced, increasing the production rate or eliminating quality problems.

* Improving reliability, increasing machine/line availability, reducing turn around time for routine maintenance operations.

* Obtaining a calender with certain specific or unusual characteristics, directed at the production of a specific product or group of products, or an unusual application.

* Obtaining a calender in a significantly reduced delivery time frame.

* The essential elements of a calender are extremely durable, and if not subjected to abuse, have an indefinite service life. Wear parts can be renewed relatively economically, and modifications applied in connection with an upgrade can modernize an older calender to performance characteristics essentially equal to that of a new calender.

What must the calender do?

The calender must produce one or more continuous sheets of polymer, uniform in gauge both across the sheet and in the machine direction, and do so under conditions of varying load and temperature. In some instances, the calender is also tasked with coating one or both sides of a substrate with the sheet or sheets produced.

Roll separating forces (RSF), which must be resisted by the roll, main bearings, roll adjust mechanisms and the calender end frames, vary with gauge, viscosity, line speed, bank shape and action.

The tools available to the operator to induce the product to track the proper roll, compensate for variations in roll separating force, and adjust for changes in operating conditions, include: roll speed, relative roll speed (friction ratio), roll surface temperature, and may include the ability to adjust apparent rob crown, if the calender is equipped with cross axis or roll bending.

Additional requirements which may be imposed on the calender include the ability to pass splice in a substrate, control the pressure or force in a laminating pass, open the rolls quickly in the event of an accident or line stoppage, automatically adjust roll opening to maintain gauge and automatically adjust the amount of crown correction to compensate for changes in the RSF.

There are additional safety considerations which need to be factored into the calender specifications. The calender rolls must stop within a specified distance in the event of an emergency, the operator must be protected from the in-running nips to the greatest extent possible, the exposed rotating elements of the drive train must be guarded to prevent accidents, and the water end should be shrouded to prevent injury in the event of failure in the piping system for the heat transfer media.

These requirements have evolved in sophistication over time, and older calenders often addressed them in more rudimentary ways than more modem calenders. Some features were not included at all, either because they were not required by the original application, or because they were not available at the time that the calender was built.

Defining the project

As with any major capital project, determining whether or not to consider upgrading an older calender does not begin with the technical issues. The first step is the identification of the commercial requirements for the calender. Even if the output of the calender will be consumed internal to the organization, there is still a customer or market who determines what the calender must do, and even whether the task should be done with a calender at all.

The market will define the product to be made, in terms of the material to be processed, the annual production rate, the sheet width, gauge, surface finish, sheet shape tolerance and the variety of products to be produced on the calender. Market information will also determine the expected production life of the line and will affect the amount of money which can be reasonably justified for the project.

Application analysis

This is the determination of the machine characteristics necessary to enable the efficient production of the identified family of products. In this process, data on process temperature, expected fine speeds, rob loads (roll separating force), required roll torque or power and roll surface finish requirements, are collected and analyzed to come up with a preliminary set of specifications for the calender.

In making the analysis, the existence of trade-offs is identified and evaluated. Higher line speeds result in higher roll separating forces, require better heat transfer characteristics and improved stock warm-up and feeding equipment. The larger the variety of products that must be produced, the greater the degree of versatility which will have to be built into the calender.

Once the preliminary specifications for the calender have been established, other factors can be evaluated and added to the specifications. Among these are operating costs, maintenance and reliability concerns, and operator and supervisory skill requirements. With the application analysis complete, the process of determining whether or not to proceed with an upgrade can be undertaken.

What can be accomplished in an upgrade?

Among the features which can either be upgraded or added to an existing calender are:

* Variable friction. One or more nips of the calender can be provided with variable friction by converting from single or dual motor drive to dual or individual roll drive. Variable friction allows for controlling the rate of work input into the stock in the calender nip and influencing the transfer of stock from one roll to another. In coating operations, the ability to vary friction ratio provides control of an important process variable.

This possibility is illustrated by figure 1, a 24" x 66" inverted "L" calender for PVC sheet production. This calender has been converted from single motor bull gear and pinion drive to two motor drive. Rolls 2 (top) and 4 (bottom) are driven from parallel shaft gear reducers by means of flexible spindles. Rolls nos. 1 (offset) and 3 (middle) are driven by means of connecting gears located on the water end of the calender. This calender was also retrofitted with an "in the box" form of roll crossing Farrel called a Crown Compensator. Note the oversize no. 4 roll bearing box.

* Preloads. Despite the fact that a gradual shift to the use of roller bearings in calenders began in earnest nearly 30 years ago, the majority of installed calenders, and in particular, the majority of the calenders available on the used market, are fitted with journal bearings. Adding preloads to the rolls in the calender that are not loaded by their weight into their loaded rotating centers can significantly reduce the sensitivity of these calenders to variations in roll loading.

Adding preloads requires space outboard of the main bearing for a secondary bearing. This often means that the addition of preloads must be coupled with upgrading the drive train, to remove the connecting gears, and provide the needed space.

* Pull backs. Pull backs can be added to calenders fitted with anti-friction bearings to eliminate the clearances in the roll adjust mechanism. (Preloads do the same thing for journal bearing calenders.) This improves the precision of initial gap setting, and helps to reduce the effect of variation in RSF on gauge.

* Drilled roll(s). Bored or cored rolls can be replaced with drilled rolls to achieve a significant improvement in heat transfer capabilities. Most frequently, this will entail a new roll or rolls. There are drilled rolls in existence on the used market, but not a large number at any given time. Finding one or more with the correct geometry at any given time is problematic.

Drilled rolls provide a number of advantages, among them:

1. Much more precise control of the actual surface temperature of the roll.

2. The ability to respond to temperature changes in the stock by adding or removing heat quickly as required, and the ability, with a good temperature control system, to sense when this is required.

3. The ability to quickly come to the desired operating temperature when roll surface temperature must be changed for a different product or set of operating conditions.

4. Improved thermal "flatness" - a more uniform temperature profile across the roll face.

5. Much more rapid recovery to the target temperature during that portion of the roll rotation in which the roll is not covered by stock.

The act of calendering converts some portion of the mechanical energy of rotating the rolls into heat in the stock. This heat is either lost to the surroundings in the form of radiation, or extracted from the stock by the roll. In those applications where the roll is removing heat from the stock, heat is gradually building up in the roll surface. The temperature of the heat transfer media must be adjusted to provide a thermal gradient sufficient to achieve an equilibrium between the heat flowing from the stock and the heat being removed through the roll if the roll surface temperature is to remain at the optimum process temperature.

In extremely short runs, the build up of heat in the roll surface is not an issue. In very long runs, there is time to adjust things so that equilibrium is achieved.

With intermediate runs, cored or bored rolls simply cannot react fast enough to keep the roll surface temperature where it should be, and stock sticks or bags, depending on the direction of the heat change and the characteristics of the product.

This problem is less noticeable at low speeds, as some of the excess heat will radiate from the roll surface during that portion of each roll rotation when the roll is uncovered. As line speed increases, the roll has less time to radiate heat, and roll surface temperature rises.

For these, and other reasons that really require a separate article to develop fully, the replacement of a bored or cored roll in at least that position or positions in the calender in which the roll is covered with stock during a portion of its rotation, can significantly improve control of the process and extend the range of operation of the calender.

* Crown correction. All rolls deflect under the load imposed on them by the stock. The amount of that deflection depends on the roll geometry and the magnitude of the RSF. If the RSF is held constant, the roll deflection can be exactly compensated for by grinding a crown onto the body of one of the two rolls in the affected roll pair equal to twice the deflection of the two rolls.

This approach has been successfully used for many years. By selecting the amount of crown carefully, and varying the operating conditions, a fairly wide range of products can be run successfully. Particularly with older bored or cored rolls, increasing roll temperature will add crown to the rolls due to the slightly higher temperature at the center of the rolls. Increasing line speed will increase RSF, coping with too much crown, slowing line speed will decrease RSF, reducing the amount of crown required. Increasing stock temperature will decrease RSF, decreasing it will increase RSF.

Each of these techniques is limited in range, and limits productivity in some fashion. For this reason, the ability to alter the crown, or apparent crown, adds considerably to the operating flexibility of a calender. There are two fundamental methods of accomplishing this, with many variations in the actual execution of both concepts.

1. Cross axis or roll skewing is the older of the two techniques. In rubber calenders, the majority of which are operated as single nip calenders from a sheet forming standpoint (ref. 1), it is usually applied to the outboard roll in the sheet forming nip.

From a mechanical standpoint, this roll must be driven in such a manner that it can be skewed about its midpoint. The technique for accomplishing this depends on the drive arrangement. If the roll is already spindle driven from fixed gearing, the addition of roll crossing requires checking to be sure that the spindle will accommodate the additional angular misalignmnent under load. Increasing the amount of angular misalignment reduces the load rating of the spindle. A spindle originally designed to accommodate only the movement of the roll while opening may be underrated for a cross axis application.

Applying cross axis to a roll results in considerably greater angular misalignment, and the roll will be operate dunder full load in that condition. Depending on the spindle design and the space available, it may be possible to lengthen the spindle(s) and move the drive further away from the calender to overcome this problem. Universal joint type spindles should be avoided for this application. Since the axis of the roll will be skewed with respect to the axis of the gear reducer output shaft, the universal joints will produce a non-uniform rotational velocity of the roll.

If the roll is driven by means of connecting gears, and changing the drive system over to individual roll drive is not part of the upgrade, a swivel gear must be substituted for one of the two connecting gears in the set. A swivel gear has an internal hub with barrel shaped external gear teeth that fit into mating internal teeth in the outer gear, allowing the outer gear to swivel on the hub, working in exactly the same manner as a gearflex coupling.

There are several mechanical challenges involved in retrofitting cross axis to an existing calender. The main bearing boxes must be modified to provide room for movement in the frame in a direction at right angles to the roll adjust mechanism; the arrangement for securing the boxes in the frame must allow the box to pivot slightly to follow the change of angle of the roll journal with respect to the calender end frame; the roll adjust mechanism must be modified to allow for lateral motion of the box with minimal friction; the roll adjust mechanism must also be modified to resist the lateral loads imposed as the roll is crossed; the crossing mechanism itself must be fitted to the calender frame; if preloads already exist, they must be modified to allow the bearing box to move with the roll.

The advantages of roll crossing as a means of crown correction are that it offers the greatest range of correction or adjustment possible and it does not impose additional loads on the main bearings.

Some of the disadvantages are mechanical complexity, non-linear crown correction and significant lateral thrust loads on the main bearing boxes.

2. Roll bending. Roll bending, or more correctly, roll straightening, can be applied to rubber calenders either as roll to frame bending, acting on a single roll, or as reaction roll pair bending, on a pair of adjacent rolls. Like cross axis, it is most frequently applied to the outboard roll or roll pair in the sheet forming nip. In certain applications, where laminating loads are high and expected to vary due to differences in coating weights, it is also applied in the laminating pass.

Applying roll bending to an existing calender requires roll neck extensions long enough to mount the auxiliary bender bearing and bearing housing, and to provide an adequate moment arm. If the calender is fitted with connecting gear drive and the drive train is to be changed to individual roll drive, there will usually be enough roll neck remaining to fit the bender bearings. Otherwise, a new roll or rolls will be required.

The advantages of roll bending include: mechanical simplicity relative to roll crossing; the bender cylinder and bearings also function as preloads; the crown correction effect is linear; the correction obtained is more nearly the reverse of the deflection curve; and no lateral thrust loads on the main bearings resulting from the bending correction.

Disadvantages include the imposition of higher loads on the main bearings; and range of correction is limited by allowable load on main bearings and allowable roll neck stress, or both.

Figure 2 shows reaction roll pair roll bending retrofitted to a 24" x 68" three roll vertical calender. Note that the bender bearings are anti-friction roller beatings, while the main bearings are bronze sleeve bearings. This calender has also been converted to individual roll drive, with roll speeds selected for a pressure sensitive adhesive mass coating application.

* Roll adjust mechanisms and drives. A wide variety of things can be done in this area to improve the precision of roll adjustment, enable automatic control of gauge, increase safety, provide improved protection against roll damage, add the capability to operate a nip in a pressure control mode or add a necessary operating feature.

Among the things which can be accomplished:

1. Conversion from manual to motorized roll adjust.

2. Conversion of single motor roll adjust to individual motorized roll adjust for each end of each adjustable roll.

3. Conversion of single speed roll adjust to two speed with brake to increase precision and avoid overshoot.

4. Changing the pitch of the main screw and nut to provide increased precision of movement.

5. Adding roll position sensing and read-out devices to aid in set-up and making corrections.

6. Adding splice relief to permit passing a splice in the substrate with minimum loss of product. This is accomplished by means of a short stroke hydraulic cylinder built into the roll adjust screw stack-up, in conjunction with preloads or pull backs and appropriate hydraulic controls.

7. Adding quick roll opening. This is also accomplished by means of hydraulic cylinders in the roll adjust screw stack-up, usually 1-1/2 to 2 inches in stroke, in conjunction with preloads or pull backs and appropriate controls.

8. Provision of hydraulic roll adjust, either in combination with screw adjustment or full hydraulic.

Figure 3 is a 28" x 70" four roll inverted "L" calender. The roll adjusts on this calender were converted from a single motor for each roll to individual two speed brake motors at each end of each roll, and splice relief and preloads were added to the no. 2 roll. The calender was converted to individual roll drive with new gear reducers and spindles, and an all new lubrication system was built. The photo shows the calender during erection - the no. 4 or bottom roll is only part way into the calender.

* Calender geometry. Without making other changes, or in conjunction with any of several other modifications, the calender itself can be tilted to improve feeding characteristics to provide better access for attachments and web handling equipment.

Figure 4 shows a 28" x 66" four roll straight "Z" calender converted from PVC service to tire cord calendering. The calender was inclined 30[degrees] using frame extensions. Other changes included the addition of roll crossing the bottom offset roll, splice relief to the no. 2 roll, and hydraulic quick opening to rolls nos. 1, 2 and 4. The calender was also converted to individual roll drive with new gear reducers, drive stands and spindles.

* Bearings. As noted above, the majority of the installed base of calenders, and those available on the used market, have bronze sleeve journal bearings. There is no performance penalty related to sleeve bearings, provided they are properly maintained and the calender is operated with care. As suggested above, improvement in operation can be obtained with the addition of preloads, where practical.

There are some considerations associated with sleeve bearings that are worth noting. The establishment of a film of lubricant under the roll journal depends on the rotation of the roll. As roll speed decreases, the load rating of the bearing also decreases. Operations involving frequent starts and stops under load are candidates for conversion to roller bearings. The load carrying capacity of the bearing is also related to the viscosity of the lubricant. Under conditions of heavy loading, control of lubricant temperature to insure that the viscosity remains in the desired range is important.

The lubricant flow performs another essential task, particularly in rolls operated above the desired lubricant t temperature. The lubricant functions as a heat transfer medium, carrying off excess heat from the bearing. In those calenders which have experienced excess bearing wear or failure, reworking or upgrading the circulating oil lubrication system is a worthwhile effort. Adding bearing temperature sensing thermocouples and alarms can also pay dividends in reduced down time and bearing replacement cost.

Proper run-in of new bearings is essential to good service life, and is a component part of any bearing overhaul or calender rebuild. Conversion from sleeve bearings to roller bearings is sometimes undertaken, for the reasons noted above. This is not done frequently, and if it is considered, an engineering evaluation is necessary to determine exactly what must be done. The roll neck geometry must be changed, and the resulting change analyzed to make sure the roll neck stresses will not exceed a safe value.

The bearing boxes themselves may or may not be salvageable, depending on the geometry of the selected bearing. Bearing retainers must be designed, and frequently, the lubrication seals changed as well.

* Widening. This is frequently possible when the added width will allow the production of a product for which there is an adequate market. As an example, a 24" x 66" (610 mm x 1,675 mm) calender can be widened to 74" (1,880 mm) by the substitution of longer rolls, the replacement of the stretcher(s) and extending the bedplate. This results in a wider calender for the cost of the rolls plus a bit more for the modifications to the bedplate and the new stretchers.

Project justification

The case for upgrading a used calender to obtain new capacity proceeds in the same manner as the financial analysis which is used to evaluate any new capital project. This applies regardless of whether the upgraded calender will be a new asset to the organization or is an existing asset being upgraded to provide new capability for a new or extended product range.

Justifying the upgrade and modernization of an existing calender for improved productivity and reduced operating costs follows the same general model, except that the collection of data to support the analysis is more critical, and relies on information that may have to be developed. Among the things to consider:

* The amount of excess material being shipped to guarantee the performance of product. If sheet is currently being calendered over gauge to meet a guaranteed minimum because of difficulty holding gauge, there is an identifiable cost savings in being able to run tighter to target.

* The amount of material rejected by the customer or production and returned due to gauge or profile problems, flow marks, poor layflat, excess shrinkage and similar issues.

* The value of the increased production which could be obtained if the line could be run faster, or the set-up time reduced or the amount of material scrapped at start-up reduced.

* The value of the time saved by reduced maintenance down time. The value of increased availability.

* The cost of orders lost because of the inability to meet specifications consistently.

* The cost of product scrapped after fabrication, due to faults in the calendered components.

Identifying a candidate

The first principal is to spend some time looking for a calender that closely approximates the machine determined by the application analysis. The likelihood that exactly what is wanted will be available is not high, but it is worth starting from that point. The next two issues of greatest importance are the rolls and the frames.

If drilled rolls are part of the specifications, the least expensive drilled rolls will be those that can be purchased with the calender. The search should be directed at a calender that already has drilled rolls. Regardless of whether the rolls are drilled, cored or bored, they should be checked for surface damage and cracks. The geometry of the roll necks should be checked. The distance from the end of the roll face to the centerline of the main bearing should be as short as possible. If preloads are to be added, the roll necks must be long enough to permit this. The same comment applies to the addition of roll bending.

The roll diameters should be measured. The majority of the calenders on the market with drilled rolls in them began life as plastics calenders. These rolls will have been frequently blocked to correct the roll shape, and may have been matted routinely for several years. It is not uncommon to find rolls identified as 24" (609.5 mm) with actual diameters of 23-1/2" (597 mm) or less. These rolls may well serve, providing that the intended application will not require frequent blocking, grinding or matting, but a decision as to their likely remaining life needs to be made based on actual data.

There are two other issues with undersize rolls. In a fixed friction calender, differences in roll diameter will change the apparent friction ratio. Secondly, there is a limit to how close together the rolls can be brought, depending on the geometry of the bearing boxes and the box windows in the calender end frames. Using undersize rolls may require shaving the boxes to allow them to be brought closer together.

The frames should be rugged, with deep arches over the roll adjust mechanisms, and should be evaluated with a clear idea of what is to be changed. If cross axis is to added, is there enough space to open the box window to accommodate the movement? Does the frame already have bosses and flats for the necessary components, or is there enough metal in the right places to machine the necessary mounting points? If preloads or benders will be added, is there room to secure the necessary brackets to the frames? Does the frame have provisions for adding the necessary attachments or enough space to bolt on mounting plates to support them?

In many instances, manufacturers used a common frame pattern for calenders of a particular size and geometry, regardless of the features to be included on the particular calender. For example, in the 1950s and 1960s, Farrel used the same castings for all 24" inclined "Z" calenders. These castings have bosses and surfaces for cross axis for both the top offset roll and the bottom offset roll, even though cross axis might be fitted to only one, or not furnished at all.

If the calender is other than a three roll vertical, in which all loads are in the same vertical axis, look for frames with integral tie bars across the windows. Tie bars add significantly to the stiffness of the frames, and are useful in all frames, but are of particular benefit in the various variants of "Z" and inverted "L" calenders. Lastly, the frames should be checked carefully for cracks. A surprisingly large number of used frames have been cracked due to accidents with the roll adjust mechanisms or otherwise overloading the frame in some manner.

If any part of the existing roll adjust system is to be retained in the upgrade, the components should be checked carefully for structural integrity and wear. Cracked worm wheel housings on the final reduction to the screw are not at all uncommon, as are worn screws and nuts, particularly in calenders that may have been fitted with automatic gauging equipment. The screws themselves should be robust, and in proportion to the frames. Look for poorly performed repairs that may require extensive rework to bring back to proper operation. The bearing boxes and bearings should be checked carefully. Worn bearings are not a major issue, but the type of bearing should be looked at carefully. Some older calenders were built with half-circle bronze bearings or stave bearings, and some few still available on the used market have Babbitt bearings.

The top and bottom rolls in these calenders are often supported in bearing boxes with asymmetrical geometry, while the center roll is supported in a heavy bearing box, more or less symmetrical about its horizontal centerline. If any significant effort is to be spent in upgrading a calender with sleeve bearings, the effort should be spent on one with full circle bronze bearings, or which can be converted to full circle bearings.

There are two basic types of thrust bearings in sleeve bearing calenders: An integral flange on the inboard end of the bearing, which either bears against the end of the box, or is fitted into a recess in the box, and a separate bronze washer or ring, usually bolted into a recess in the end of the bearing box. The existence of thrust bearings and the design are difficult to determine with the calender assembled. If it is fitted with oil seals on the main bearings for flood lubrication, the trust rings will not be visible at all.

The drive train available with the calender is of importance only if all or some of it is to be re-used in the upgrade. If the drive train will be used, the condition of the gearing should be looked at carefully. All calender drive gearing should be double helical or herringbone, to insure even motion and eliminate end thrust due to gear loading. If the gearing has been removed from the calender, the gear seats and shaft bores should be measured, to determine clearances and roundness.

If the intent is to convert from single motor drive to individual roll drive, and the connecting gears will not be used, they should be retained until a decision is made as to how the spindles will be attached to the rolls. Several conversions have been made in which the old connecting gears were cut down and converted to spindle adapters.

If the drive train already uses spindles, as in the case of an existing uni-drive calender, the condition of the spindles themselves needs to be checked. A decision to reuse or replace may be linked to other issues, as noted under the discussion on cross axis, but may also depend on the condition of the sliding surfaces in the universals or hubs.

Examples

By way of illustrating the possibilities, here are a few examples of what has been done:

* A 28" bottom fed straight "Z" PVC calender with roll crossing on the top offset roll was converted to tire cord service by adding cross axis to the bottom offset roll, changing the connecting gear ratio in the uni-drive, and adding splice relief into the adjustable roll in the laminating pass.

* A 24" three-roll vertical calender was remanufactured for an adhesive mass tape coating operation by unitizing the calender, converting it from single motor drive to two motor drive with high friction ratio in the no. 1 nip, and adding preloads to the no. 1 roll.

* A top fed 24" straight "Z" PVC calender with cross axis on the bottom offset roll was converted to tire cord service by adding cross axis to the top offset roll, adding splice relief to the no. 2 roll adjust, adding hydraulic quick opening to all adjustable nips, converting from single motor to individual roll drive, and providing special raising blocks under the end frames to tilt the calender 30[degrees], to finish up with an inclined "Z" (figure 4).

* A 28" inverted "L" PVC calender was converted for a double coated tape application by adding splice relief and preloads to the no. 2 roll, converting the roll adjust drives from one motor per pair to individual two speed motors with brakes, adding motorized bank boards and special feed bunkers, and converting from single motor drive to individual roll drive (figure 3).

The roll adjust mechanism for the top roll of an installed 24" calender was upgraded to a precision system by replacing the screw and nut with new components with a finer screw pitch, converting the roll adjust from a manual drive to individual motorized drives with two speed motors and brakes, and adding encoders directly coupled to each screw with panel mounted digital position read-outs.

* A 24" inclined "Z" with single motor drive was upgraded in two stages for a double-coated fabric application. Reaction roll pair bending was added to outboard roll pairs, preloads and splice relief were added to the no. 2 roll adjust, and the drive train was converted to two motor from single motor drive.

Conclusions

Upgrading a calender can be a time and cost effective solution to a wide variety of calendering needs. It is often the only reasonable path when resources are tight, or when major manufacturers are reluctant to tackle new or unusual applications.

As in any venture, defining the problem to be solved as carefully and completely as possible is vital to achieving a satisfactory result. Prioritizing the specification requirements carefully, and focusing on the final objectives instead of the specifics of the machine, will provide the vision and flexibility to objectively look at alternatives.

Enlisting qualified outside assistance during the application analysis stage can be very helpful. Working with reputable rebuilders is also a good choice, and essential at some point in the project. The more care and independence used in setting the parameters, the more objective the evaluation of potential machines, features and methods of adding them can be.

New machinery suppliers

The following list contains new rubber processing machinery and the companies that supply the equipment. Addresses and phone numbers of the companies follow this listing.

Assembly machines

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises, Inc. Amacoil Bartell Machinery Systems Corp. Burton Press Co. Inc. Dake Div. of JSJ Design Technology ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Firwood Manufacturing Co., Inc. Haumiller Engineering industrial Sales & Service Co. ITW Akron Standard Jaygo Karder Rubber Machinery Klockner Desma Lamac Process Liquid Control Corp. Midland Tyre Machinery Co. National Feedscrew & Machining Olympia Tool & Machine Co. Quadra Scantland Industries Spadone Machine Tidewater Machinery RMS VMI Americas

Band building

Akron Standard Design Technology Piedmont Polymer Equipment RJS Soberay Machinery & Equipment

Batch off systems

Akron Standard Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises inc. Alsop Industrial Services Armature Coil Equipment, Inc. Farrel Delta Mixer Technologies Gomaplast Machinery icon industries industrial Rubber Machinery Karder Rubber Machinery LWB Sales & Service Menzel Mesabi Control Engineering Moriyama Pathex International, Ltd. Perry Machinery Piedmont Polymer Equipment Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery Rubber City Machinery Siempelkamp Soberay Machinery & Equipment Tidewater Machinery VMI Americas West Coast Rubber Machinery Wolverine

Bead machinery

RJS Soberay Machinery & Equipment VMI Americas Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest

Belt machinery

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Berstorff Deflashing Systems Design Technology Everhard Products Hyde Manufacturing JM/KTM Machinery New Era Die Pathex International, Ltd. Schwabe, Herman, Inc. Siempelkamp Steelastic Company VMI Americas Wean Industries

Blenders

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Bepex Edge-Sweets Erie Mill & Press Federal Equipment Foremost Machine Builders Gomaplast Machinery Industrial Rubber Machinery Jaygo JM/KTM Machinery Karder Rubber Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Lightnin Littleford Brothers Machinery Reserve of Denver Morehouse-Cowles Division Morse Manufacturing Perry Machinery Piedmont Polymer Equipment Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery RMS Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Soberay Machinery & Equipment Teledyne Specialty Equip. Co. Tidewater Machinery Co. VMI Americas

Braiders

Gomaplast Machinery Karg Perry Machinery Soberay Machinery & Equipment

Calenders

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Barwell inc. Berstorff Birch Brothers, Southern Inc. Danieli Wean Edge-Sweets Ensine Corp. Erie Mill & Press Gumix S.A. Icon Industries Iddon Brothers Independent Machinery Co. investment Recovery Consultants JM/KTM Machinery Karder Rubber Machinery Killion Extruders Kobelco Stewart Bolling LWB Sales & Service MKB Industries Pathex Perry Machinery Pomini Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery RMS Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Steelastic Company Tidewater Machinery Troester Machinery Ltd. Paul Troester Maschinenfabrik West Coast Rubber Machinery

Creel systems

Karg Pathex International, Ltd. RJS

Cutting equipment

Accurate Steel Rule Die Mfrs. Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Alfa Machine Co., Inc. Barwell Louis P. Batson Bepex Birch Brothers, Southern Inc. Burton Press Component Engineering & Sales Dake Div. of JSJ Davis-Standard Deflashing Systems Design Technology John Dusenbery Company, Inc. Edge-Sweets Ensine ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Everhard Products Federal Equipment Ferry Industries Firwood Manufacturing Four Points industries Freeman Co. Freeman-Fremont Div. Gomaplast Machinery G.F. Goodman & Son The Hudson Die Group Hudson Machinery Hyde Manufacturing Industrial Rubber Machinery International Industrial Products Industrial Sales & Service Co. JLN Karder Rubber Machinery Killion Extruders Lamac Process Lever Manufacturing LME-Beamech H. Maimin Co. Manufacturers Supplies Co. McNeil & NRM Menzel Midland Tyre Machinery Co., Ltd. Mitchell MS Instrument National Group of Companies Ohio Blow Pipe Piedmont Polymer Equipment Progressive Service Die Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery J.A. Richards RJS RMS Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Ruf Machine Herman Schwabe, Inc. Simmons Engineering Sivon Manufacturing Spadone Machine Steelastic Company Taylor-Stiles Division/Littleford Day Technical Machine Products Testing Machines Troester Machinery Ltd. Paul Troester Maschinenfabrik Utility Manufacturing Versa Machinery VMI Americas Voorwood Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest West Coast Rubber Machinery Western Supplies

Dipping

ACC Automation Co. Design Technology industrial Sales & Service Co. Litzler Menzel VMI Americas

Extruders

Akron Extruders, Inc. Alsop Industrial Services Anderson International Corp. ASB Industries Barwell Black Clawson Berstorff C.W. Brabender Instruments Buss (America) Anthony Crowe AG Custom Scientific Instruments Davis-Standard Delta Mixer Technologies Egan Machinery Division Ensine Entwistle Erie Mill & Press Farrel Federal Equipment Co. Genca General Plastex inc. Gumix S.A. Haake Hardman Hudson Machinery Icon Industries Iddon Brothers Jaygo JLN Corp. JM/KTM Machinery Karder Rubber Machinery Kiffer Industries Killion Extruders Kobelco Stewart Bolling Krupp Rubber Machinery Martz Mold McNeil & NRM MKB Industries Moriyama National Feedscrew & Machining New Castle Industries Olympia Tool & Machine Perry Machinery Pomini Processall Inc. Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery RMS Roller Equipment Mfg. Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Teledyne Readco Tidewater Machinery Troester Machinery Ltd. Paul Troester Maschinenfabrik Videx Equipment Welding Engineers Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest West Coast Rubber Machinery

Hose machinery

Amacoil Berstorff Davis-Standard Entwistle ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Gomaplast Machinery Haumiller Engineering Iddon Brothers Ltd. Kobelco Stewart Bolling Manufacturers Supplies Co. MKB Industries Olympia Tool & Machine Co. Pathex international, Ltd. Perry Machinery RMS Roller Equipment Mfg. Siempelkamp Soberay Machine & Equipment Troester Machinery Ltd. Paul Troester Maschinenfabrik Versa Machinery

Let-off

ACC Automation Co. Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Alsop industrial Services Birch Brothers, Southern Inc. Calemard & Cie Davis-Standard John Dusenbery Entwistle Erhardt & Leimer Ltd. ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Federal Equipment Firwood Manufacturing Hydralign Industrial Rubber Machinery Johnstone Engineering & Machine Karg Litzler Menzel McNeil & NRM Midland Tyre Machinery Co. Ltd. Nerpco Olympia Tool & Machine Co. Pathex International, Ltd. Piedmont Polymer Equipment Progressive Machine RJS RMS Roller Equipment Mfg. Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Siempelkamp Spadone Machine Steelastic Company Troester Machinery Ltd. Utility Manufacturing VMI Americas

Material handling

ACC Automation Co. Amacoil ASB Industries Automation Products Inc. B.A.G. Corp. BBC Industries Berndorf ICB Buhler Inc. Buss (America) C&D Robotics Component Engineering & Sales Dynamic Air Ease Edge-Sweets ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Farrel Federal Equipment Foremost Machine Builders Freeman Co. Freeman-Freemont Div. W.F. Gammeter Division G.F. Goodman & Son Henderson Industries Hudson Machinery Industrial Sales & Service Co. JLN Jaygo Lewco, Inc. Littleford Brothers LME-Beamech Mesabi Control Engineering Ohio Blow Pipe Morse Manufacturing Pathex International, Ltd. Piedmont Polymer Equipment Quadra Rampe Finishing Equipment Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery RMS Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Siempelkamp Spadone Machine Starlinger North America Technical Machine Products VMI Americas Webber Manufacturing Welding Engineers Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest Wyko Engineering

Mills

Alexeff-snyder Enterprises Inc. Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Barwell Bepex Berstorff C.W. Brabender Instruments Danieli Wean Delta Mixer Technologies Ensine Corp. Erie Mill & Press Farrel Federal Equipment Gumix S.A. Icon Industries Iddon Brothers Jaygo JLN Corp. JM/KTM Machinery Karder Rubber Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Mesabi Control Engineering MKB Industries Nerpco Perry Machinery Pomini Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery RMS Roller Equipment Mfg. Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Troester Machinery Ltd. Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest West Coast Rubber Machinery Wyssmont

Mixers, cage

ASB Industries Charles Ross & Son Federal Equipment Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Teledyne Readco Tidewater Machinery

Mixers, closed

ASB Industries Conn and Co. Federal Equipment Jaygo Kobelco Stewart Bolling Lightnin Littleford Day Machinery Reserve of Denver Morse Manufacturing Processall Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Teledyne Readco Tidewater Machinery

Mixers, continuous

Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Bepex C.W. Brabender Instruments Buss (America) Conn and Co. Delta Mixer Technologies Edge-Sweets Farrel Federal Equipment Foremost Machine Builders Haake Investment Recovery Consultants Jaygo JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Lightnin Littleford Day Machinery Reserve of Denver Mesabi Control Engineering Perry Machinery Pomini Processall Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Teledyne Readco Tidewater Machinery Welding Engineers

Mixers, internal

Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Barwell Bepex C.W. Brabender Instruments Conn Delta Mixer Technologies Edge-Sweets Farrel Federal Equipment Gumix S.A. Haake Icon Industries investment Recovery Consultants Jaygo JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Lightnin Littleford Day Mesabi Control Engineering Moriyama Nerpco Perry Machinery Pomini Charles Ross & Son Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Skinner Engine Technical Machine Products Teledyne Readco Tidewater Machinery Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest West Coast Rubber Machinery

Molds

Alsop Industrial Services Delaware Valley Hamilton Mold and Machine Inc. W.S. Holmes Hull Hydatecs Kobelco Stewart Bolling MKB Industries Inc. Pathex REP Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber Molding Technology Sivon Testing Machines Tomco Equipment Co. West Coast Rubber Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Mold cleaning

Armature Coil Equipment, Inc. Cold Jet Friess Equipment Maxi-Blast Presses, automatic

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. Altman Mfg. Anderson International Corp. ASB Industries BBA/Maplan Brockton/Boston Cutting Die Carver Consolidated Baling Machine Dake Division of JSJ Design Technology Edge-Sweets Erie Mill & Press Freeman French Oil Mill Machinery Gumix S.A. Hudson Machinery Hull/Fimmac Icon Industries Iddon Brothers Industrial Sales & Service Co. JM/KTM Machinery Klockner Desma Kobelco Stewart Bolling Krupp Rubber Machinery Lamac Process LWB Sales & Service MKB Industries Modern Hydraulic Nerpco Pathex International Perry Machinery PHI REP Rogers Industrial Products Inc. Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber Molding Technology Shaw-Almex USA Siempelkamp Corp. Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery TTARP Industries Wabash MPI West Coast Rubber Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Presses, C-frame, tread rubber

ASB Industries BBA/Maplan Brockton/Boston Cutting Die Dake Division of JSJ Danieli Wean Dieffenbacher Erie Mill & Press Gluco Icon Industries JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling LWB Sales & Service Pacific Press & Shear Inc. Pathex International Perry Machinery REP Rubber Molding Technology Shaw-Almex USA Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Presses, circular

ASB Industries Barwell Klockner Desma Pathex International Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Presses, compression

Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Barwell Brockton/Boston Cutting Die Carver Clifton Fluid Power Machinery Consolidated Baling Machine Anthony Crowe AG Danieli Wean Delaware Valley Mfg. Dieffenbacher North America Erie Mill & Press Federal Equipment French Oil Mill Machinery Gluco Gumix S.A. Hull/Fimmac Hydratecs Injection Equipment icon Industries Iddon Brothers JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling LWB Sales & Service MKB Industries Modern Hydraulic Nerpco Pacific Press & Shear Inc. Pathex International Perry Machinery PHI REP Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Rubber Molding Technology Sandvik Process Systems Shaw-Almex USA Sivon Manufacturing Starlinger North America Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Wabash MPI West Coast Rubber Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Presses, extrusion

Anderson International Corp. ASB Industries Carver Erie Mill & Press Federal Equipment Gumix S.A. Hudson Machinery Icon Industries Killion Extruders Modern Hydraulic Pathex International Perry Machinery RMS Sivon Manufacturing Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery U.S. Molding Machinery Wabash MPI Williams-White & Co.

Presses, hydraulic

Alsop Industrial Services Altman Mfg. ASB Industries Barwell Brockton/Boston Cutting Die Burton Press Carver Consolidated Baling Machine Dake Division of JSJ Danieli Wean Delaware Valley Mfg. Dieffenbacher North America Erie Mill & Press Federal Equipment Freeman Co. Freeman-Fremont Div. French Oil Mill Machinery Gumix S.A. Hudson Machinery Hull/Fimmac Hydratecs Injection Equipment Icon Industries Iddon Brothers Industrial Sales & Service Co. International Industrial Products Jaygo JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Krupp Rubber Machinery Lamac Process LWB Sales & Service MKB Industries Modern Hydraulic Nerpco Pacific Press & Shear Inc. Pathex International Perry Machinery PHI Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Rubber Molding Technology Shaw-Almex USA Sivon Manufacturing Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Ttarp Industries Wabash MPI West Coast Rubber Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Presses, injection

Alsop Industrial Services ASB Industries Barwell Battenfeld Corp. Carver Dake Division of JSJ Dieffenbacher North America Engel Canada Engel Machinery Epco French Oil Mill Machinery Gluco H & L Tool & Die Limited Hudson Machinery Hull/Fimmac Hydratecs Injection Equipment Icon Industries JM/KTM Machinery Klockner Desma LWB Sales & Service McNeil & NRM Mitsui Machine MIR USA MKB Industries Perry Machinery REP Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Rubber Molding Technology Sivon Manufacturing Starlinger North America Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery U.S. Molding Machinery Wabash MPI Williams-White & Co.

Presses, transfer

ASB Industries Barwell Carver Dake Division of JSJ Dieffenbacher North America Erie Mill & Press French Oil Mill Machinery Gluco Hudson Machinery Hull/Fimmac Hydratecs Injection Equipment Icon Industries JM/KTM Machinery LWB Sales & Service Max Muller MKB Industries Modern Hydraulic Pacific Press & Shear Inc. Pathex International Perry Machinery PHI REP Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Rubber Molding Technology Sivon Manufacturing Technical Machine Products Tidewater Machinery Wabash MPI West Coast Rubber Machinery Williams-White & Co.

Slitters

ACC Automation Co. Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises Inc. ASB Industries Barwell Louis P. Batson Birch Brothers, Southern Inc. Calemard & Cie Deflashing Systems John Dusenbery Edge-Sweets Erhardt & Leimer Ltd. ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc. Everhard Products Ferry Industries Freeman Co. Freeman-Freemont Div. Gomaplast Machinery G.F. Goodman & Son The Hudson Die Group Hudson Machinery Hyde Manufacturing Hydralign Icon Industries Independent Machine Industrial Rubber Machinery JLN Johnstone Engineering & Machine Karder Rubber Machinery Lever Manufacturing Littleford Day LME-Beamech H. Maimin Co. Manufacturers Supplies Co. Menzel Midland Tyre Machinery Co. Ltd. National Group of Companies OP-AI Electric & Manufacturing Perry Machinery RJS Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Rubber City Machinery Ruf Machine Siempelkamp South Bend Lathe Spadone Machine Stanford, Division, MAN Roland Steelastic Company Taylor-Stiles Division/Littleford Day Tidewater Machinery VMI Americas Voorwood

Steelcord belting

Midland Tyre Machinery Co. Ltd. Pathex International, Ltd. Siempelkamp Steelastic Company

Tire machinery

Alkar Alsop Industrial Services Bartell Machinery Systems C&D Robotics Davis-Standard Firwood Manufacturing ITW Akron Standard JM/KTM Machinery Kobelco Stewart Bolling Krupp Rubber Machinery Lang (VMI Americas) McNeil & NRM Measurex Mesabi Control Engineering Midland Tyre Machinery Co. Ltd. National Feedscrew & Machining National Group of Companies RMS Rogers Industrial Products Inc. Rubber Associated Machinery-R.A.M. Scantland Industries Soberay Machine & Equipment Spadone Machine Tidewater Machinery Utility Manufacturing VMI Americas Wyko Engineering

Trimmers

ACC Automation Co. Carver Deflashing Systems Everhard Products Ferry Industries Hudson Machinery Hyde Manufacturing Hydralign Krupp Rubber Machinery Menzel Mitchell Op-Al Electric & Manufacturing Progressive Service Die Co. Scantland Industries Herman Schwabe, Inc. Spadone Machine Wabash MPI

Machinery and equipment suppliers

The following directory gives the address and contact person for those companies listed under the specific equipment categories in the section preceding this one. These companies supply new machinery to the rubber industry.

ACC Automation Co.

William L. Howe 730 Carroll St. Akron, OH 44304 Phone: (330) 762-9188 Fax: (330) 762-1113

Acrolab

7475 Tranby Ave. Windsor, Ontario, Canada N8S 2B7 Phone: (800) 265-9542 Fax: (800) 465-9674

Akron Extruders, Inc.

David Kattan 1119 Milan St. Canal Fulton, OH 44614-0547 Phone: (330) 854-41 11 Fax: (330) 854-6066

Alexeff-Snyder Enterprises, Inc.

A. Alexeff 9621 York-Alpha Dr. Cleveland, OH 44133 Phone: (216) 237-2300 Fax: (216) 237-8228

Alfa Machine Co., Inc.

Jim Vanderhout 2425 W. Purdue St. Milwaukee, WI 53209 Phone: (414) 445-8180 Fax: (414) 445-8181

Alkar Inc.

James Broch, President 1225 E. Summit St. Alliance, OH 44601-3234 Phone: (330) 821-4537 Fax: (330) 821-1261

Alpheus Cleaning Technologies

Howard Barley, Sales Engineer 9119 Milliken Ave. Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 Phone: (800) 600-1774 Fax: (909) 980-3885

Alsop Industrial Services

Donald R. Alsop P.O. Box 33802 Indianapolis, IN 46203-0802 Phone: (317) 783-0885 Fax: (317) 783-0891

Altman Mfg. Co.

Paul Altman, President 1990 Ohio St. Lisle, IL 60532 Phone: (630) 963-0031 Fax: (630) 963-0089

Amacoil, Inc.

John Scavitto P.O. Box 2228 21 00 Bridgewater Road Aston, PA 19014 Phone: (610) 485-8300 Phone: (800) 252-2645 Fax: (610) 485-2357

Anderson International Corp.

Len Trocano 6200 Harvard Ave. Cleveland, OH 44105 Phone: (216) 641-1112 Fax: (216) 641-0709

Armature Coil Equipment, Inc.

Robert Heran 4725 Manufacturing Rd. Cleveland, OH 44135 Phone: (800) 255-1241 Fax: (216) 267-4361

ASB Industries, Inc.

John F. Lindeman and Alan Kocsis 1031 Lambert St. Barberton, OH 44203 Phone: (330) 753-8458 Fax: (330) 753-7550

Automation Products Inc.

Technical Applications Dept. 3030 Max Roy St. Houston, TX 77008 Phone: (713) 869-0361 Fax: (713) 869-7332

B.A.G. Corp.

Angela Montgomery, Sales Coordinator 11510 Data Dr. Dallas, TX 75218 Phone: (800) 224-3647 Fax: (214) 340-4598

Bartell Machinery Systems Corp.

Christopher M. Rushton 6321 Elmer Hill Rd. Rome, NY 13440 Phone: (315) 336-7600 Fax: (315) 336-0947

Barwell, Inc.

460 Tacoma Ave. Tallmadge, OH 44278 Phone: (330) 633-5734 Fax: (330) 633-6367

Louis P. Batson Inc.

Glenn Batson, Group Manager 1 Club Rd. Box 3978 Greenville, SC 29608 Phone: (864) 242-5262 Fax: (864) 271-4535

BBC Industries, Inc.

Jesse C. Stricker 1526 Fenpark Dr. Fenton, MO 63026 Phone: (314) 343-5600 Phone: (800) 654-4205

Edwin H. Benz Co., Inc.

John Curran, VP Sales 73 Maplehurst Ave. Providence, RI 02908 Phone: (401) 331-5650 Fax: (401) 331-5685

Bepex Corporation

Ralph Imholte 333 Taft St., N.E. Minneapolis, MN 55413 Phone: (612) 331-4370

Berndorf ICB International Conveyor

Belts, Inc. Jules Schwager 820 Estes Ave. Schaumburg, IL 60193 Phone: (847) 891-8650 Phone: (800) 422-6277 Fax: (847) 891-7563

Berstorff Corporation

Peter F. Hunziker, V.P., Rubber Div. 8200 Arrowridge Blvd. P.O. Box 240357 Charlotte, NC 28224 Phone: (704) 523-2614 Fax: (704) 523-4353

Birch Brothers, Southern, Inc.

Steven W. Birch, President P.O. Box 70 9510 New Town Rd. Waxhaw, NC 28173 Phone: (704) 843-2111 Fax: (704) 843-3936

The Black Clawson Converting Machinery Corp.

Charles H. Crumb, Bus. Group Mgr. 46 N. First St. Fulton, NY 13069 Phone: (315) 598-7121 Fax: (315) 593-0396

C.W. Brabender Instruments, Inc.

Kevin R. Van Allen, Director, Sales and Marketing 50 E. Wesley St. P.O. Box 2127 South Hackensack, NJ 07606 Phone: (201) 343-8425 Fax: (201) 343-0608 E-mail: CWBI@ix.netcom.com

Brockton/Boston Cutting Die

Jerold B. Larson, General Manager 1876 Memorial Dr. Avon, MA 02322 Phone: (508) 583-3650 Fax: (508) 589-7370

Buhler Inc.

1100 Xenium Lane Minneapolis, MN 55440 Phone: (612) 545-1401 Fax: (612) 540-9246 Burton Press Co., Inc.

Ray Flynn, President 2156 Avon Industrial Dr. Rochester Hills, MI 48309-3610 Phone: (800) 394-0213 Fax: (248) 853-2102

Buss (America), Inc.

230 Covington Dr. Bloomingdale, IL 60108 Phone: (708) 307-9900 Fax: (708) 307-9905

C&D Robotics - A Division of Ohmstede Inc.

Joe Beavers, Dir. of Mech. Eng. 690 Hazel Beaumont, TX 77701 Phone: (409) 832-4991 Fax: (409) 833-0045

Calemard & Cie

Rue De La Poudriere Zi Du Buisson, BP 43 42230 Roche La Moliere France Phone: 77-90-00-34 Fax: 77-90-36-83

Carver, Inc.

Keith Larson, Mgr., Sales and Mktg. P.O. Box 544 Wabash, IN 46992-0544 Phone: (219) 563-7577, ext. 249 Fax: (219) 563-7625

C.D.S., Inc.

Ron Jacobson, Vice President 130 E. Dryer Rd., Unit C Santa Ana, CA 92707 Phone: (714) 549-5135 Fax: (714) 549-1471

Chronos Richardson Limited

Howard Heeley Arnside Road Bestwood Nottingham, Notts NG5 5HD, U.K. Phone: +44 (0) 115 935 351 Fax: +44 (0) 115 9606941

Cold Jet

David Hall, Marketing Representative 455 Wards Corner Rd. Loveland, OH 45140 Phone: (513) 831-3211 Fax: (513) 831-1209

Conn and Co.

R.C. Freeman 11 S. Marion St. Warren, PA 16365 Phone: (814) 723-7980 Fax: (814) 723-8502

Consolidated Baling Machine

Ted C. Flood P.O. Box 6922 Jacksonville, FL 32236 Phone: (800) 231-9286 Phone: (904) 358-3812 Fax: (904) 358-7013

Cryogenic Systems & Parts

Joyce Enderud, Office Manager 3595 Cadillac Ave. Costa Mesa, CA 92626 Phone: (714) 241-7793 Fax: (714) 241-7261

Cryo Mech Equip. Corp.

William J. Stock, President 3601 West Moore Ave. Santa Ana, CA 92704 Phone: (714) 545-6833 Fax: (714) 545-2914

Dake Division of JSJ Corp.

Frank Kennedy 692 Robbins Rd. Grand Haven, MI 49417 Phone: (616) 842-7110 Fax: (616) 842-0859

Danieli Wean, Inc.

O.L. Yeager, Sales Engineer 3805 Henricks Rd. Youngstown, OH 44501 Phone: (330) 797-2000 Fax: (330) 797-2068

Davis-Standard

Dan Szewc, Business Area Manager 1 Extrusion Dr. Pawcatuck, CT 06379 Phone: (203) 599-1010 Fax: (203) 599-2952

Deflashing Systems, Inc.

J.B. Haser, President P.O. Box 300 Chicago, IL 60690-0300 Phone: (708) 256-1199 Fax: (708) 256-1334

Delaware Valley Mfg. Co., Inc.

Harold Berry, Jr., President Northwood & Olive St. Cherry Hill, NJ 08002 Phone: (609) 663-0131 Fax: (609) 663-8515

Delta Mixer Technologies

John Amman 6200 Harvard Cleveland, OH 44105 Phone: (216) 641-4416 Fax: (216) 641-4437

Design Technology Corp.

Marvin Menzin 5 Suburban Pk. Dr. Billerica, MA 01821 Phone: (508) 663-7000 Fax: (508) 663-6841

Dieffenbacher North America Inc.

Peter A. Day, Tech. Sales Mgr. 1720 N. Talbot Rd. Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9A 6J3 Phone: (519) 737-6144 Fax: (519) 737-6214

John Dusenbery Company Inc.

Orest Lebed, VP Sales / Marketing 220 Franklin Rd. Randolph, NJ 07869 Phone: (201) 366-7500 Fax: (201) 366-7453

Dynamic Air

Bob Adamzak, Marketing Manager 1125 Wolters Blvd. St. Paul, MN 55110 Phone: (612) 484-2900 Fax: (612) 484-7015

Edge-Sweets Co.

2887 Three Mile Rd., N.W. Grand Rapids, MI 49504 Phone: (616) 453-5458 Fax: (616) 453-6227

Engel Canada Inc.

John Timmerman, Manager 545 Elmira Rd. Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1K 1C2 Phone: (519) 836-0220 Fax: (519) 836-3714

Engel Machinery Inc.

Scott Kroeger, Product Manager 3740 Board Rd., Rd. #5 York, PA 17402 Phone: (717) 764-6818 Fax: (717) 764-0314

Engel Vertriebsgesellschaft m.b.H.

Manfred Arning Ludwig-Engel-Str.1 Schwertberg, A 4311 Phone: (0043) 7262-620-305 Fax: (0043) 7262-620-488

Ensine Corp.

S. Koshbin, President 2743 2nd St. Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221 Phone: (330) 928-1178 Fax: (330) 928-0893

Entwistle Co.

Thomas A. Murphy, V.P., Sales Bigelow St. Hudson, MA 01749 Phone: (508) 481-4000 Fax: (508) 562-4808

Epco

George W. Dallas, Dir. of Sales 2225 Cedar St. Fremont, OH 43420 Phone: (419) 334-2631 Fax: (419) 334-2822

Erhardt & Leimer Ltd.

Ignatius J. Manning, V.P., Gen. Mgr. 930 Century Drive Burlington, Ontario, Canada L7L 5P2 Phone: (905) 632-8181 Fax: (905) 632-9473

Erie Mill & Press Co., Inc.

John A. Nowak, President 953 E. 12th St. Erie, PA 16512 Phone: (814) 454-1581 Fax: (814) 454-7913

ESI, Extrusion Services, Inc.

Peter Anderson, President 850 Moe Dr. Akron, OH 44310 Phone: (330) 630-1861 Fax: (330) 630-1862

Everhard Products, Inc.

C.R. Backus 1016 Ninth St. S.W. Canton, OH 44707 Phone: (330) 453-7786 Fax: (330) 453-7786

Farrel Corporation

William F. Flaherty, Director of Sales 25 Main St. Ansonia, CT 06401-1601 Phone: (203) 736-5500 Fax: (203) 735-6267

Federal Equipment Co.

Howard Rosichan 8200 Bessemer Ave. Cleveland, OH 44127 Phone: (216) 271-3500 Fax: (216) 271-5210 www.fedequip.com

Ferry Industries, Inc.

Terrance J. Gillian, V.P., Sales 1687 Commerce Dr. Stow, OH 44224-1752 Phone: (330) 688-4400 Fax: (330) 686-0507

Firwood Manufacturing Company

Michael A. Huber, Sales Manager 23915 Kean Ave. P.O. Box 2489 Dearborn, MI 48123 Phone: (313) 274-5100 Fax: (313) 274-4537

Foremost Machine Builders, Inc.

C.J. Weinpel 23 Spielman Rd.; P.O. Box 644 Fairfield, NJ 07004 Phone: (201) 227-0700 Fax: (201) 227-7307

Four Points Industries Corp.

William D. Shea 112A Cherry Lane Floral Park, NY 11001 Phone: (516) 352-4332 Fax: (516) 775-0704

Freeman Co. Carl Dragan, National Sales Manager 1369 Cox Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 Phone: (606) 371-4433 Fax: (606) 525-0992

Freeman-Fremont Division

Larry Mears 432 N. Wood St.; P.O. Box 231 Fremont, OH 43420 Phone: (419) 334-9709 Fax: (419) 334-3426

French Oil Mill Machinery

Robert E. Christy 1035 W. Greene St. Piqua, OH 45356 Phone: (513) 773-3420, ext. 247 Fax: (513) 773-3424

Friess Equipment, Inc.

James Friess, President 2222 Akron Peninsula Rd. Akron, OH 44313 Phone: (330) 945-9440 Fax: (330) 923-5833

W.F. Gammeter Division (of Everhard Products, Inc.)

C.R. Backus 1016 9th Street S.W. Canton, OH 44707 Phone: (330) 453-7786 Fax: (330) 453-7449

Genca

Dennis Johnson, Mgr. Sales & Mktg. 13805 58th St. N. Clearwater, FL 34622 Phone: (813) 524-3622 Fax: (813) 573-1604

General Plastex Inc.

R. Hershberger, President 35 Stuver Place Barberton, OH 44203 Phone: (800) 777-4719 Phone: (330) 745-7775 Fax: (330) 745-6939

Gluco, Inc.

David Linehan, Sales Manager 0-794 Chicago Dr. Jenison, MI 49428 Phone: (616) 457-1212 Fax: (616) 457-3620

G.F. Goodman & Son Inc.

Duke Davis, Vice President Two Ivybrook Blvd. Ivyland, PA 18974 Phone: (215) 672-8810 Fax: (215) 441-8949

Grieve Corporation

Frank Calabres, Sales Manager 500 Hart Rd. Round Lake, IL 60073 Phone: (847) 546-8225 Fax: (847) 546-9210

Gumix S.A.

H. Sidler, Director of Sales c/o Maria Fortuny, 9-11 P.O. Box 18 08940 Cornella (Barcelona), Spain Phone: (34-3) 474 20 29/377 07 50 Fax: (34-3) 377 07 58 Telex: 98430 GUMI E

Haake, Inc.

Bill Langley 53 W. Century Rd. Paramus, NJ 07652 Phone: (800) 631-1369 Phone: (201) 265-7865 Fax: (201) 265-1977

Hamilton Mold and Machine Inc.

Mark Fleming 25016 Lakeland Blvd. Cleveland, OH 44132 Phone: (216) 732-8200 Fax: (216) 261-9533

Haumiller Engineering Co. Pierce Wrapping Mach. Division

John Giacopelli 445 Renner Dr. Elgin, IL 60123 Phone: (708) 695-9111

Henderson Industries

H.F. Henderson 45 Fairfield Place West Caldwell, NJ 07006 Phone: (201) 227-9250 Fax: (201) 227-9188

W.S. Holmes & Co.

Dave Williams 384 Romans Rd. Elmhurst, IL 60126 Phone: (708) 530-2606 Fax: (708) 530-1612

The Hudson Die Group

George Tougas, President 1876 Memorial Drive Avon, MA 02322 Phone: (508) 583-3650

Hudson Machinery Corporation

Jay Esterkes, Executive Vice President 32 Stevens St. Haverhill, MA 01830 Phone: (508) 374-0303 Fax: (508) 373-7295

Hull Corp.

C. Ted Lind, V.P., Sales and Mktg. 1830 Davisville Rd. Hatboro, PA 19040 Phone: (215) 672-7800

Hull/Fimmac

Jack Mac Innes 21 Bonair Drive Warminster, PA 18974 Phone: (215) 441-8316 Fax: (215) 441-8168

Hyde Manufacturing Co.

William D. Fletcher 54 Eastford Rd. Southbridge, MA 01550 Phone: (508) 764-4344 Fax: (508) 765-5250

Hydralign Web Guide Controls

John Curran, Director of Sales 761 Main St., Rt. 1A Walpole, MA 02081 Phone: (800) 688-0954 Fax: (508) 660-1993

Hydratecs Injection Equipment, Inc.

C. Chiofolo 430 Morgan Ave. Akron, OH 44311 Phone: (330) 773-0491 Fax: (330) 773-3800

Icon Industries

Thomas D. Jacques, President 1438 Eastern S.E. Grand Rapids, MI 49507 Phone: (616) 241-1877 Fax: (616) 241-5578

Iddon Brothers Ltd.

Michael I. Iddon, Mgr. Director Quin St. Leyland, Lancashire England PR5 1TB Phone: 0044 1772 421258 Fax: 0044 1772 431114

Independent Machine Company

Sales Administrator 2 Stewart Place Fairfield, NJ 07004 Phone: (201) 882-0060 Fax: (201) 808-9505

Industrial Rubber Machinery, Inc.

Larry Weber, President P.O. Box 27087 Akron, OH 44319 Phone: (330) 645-0020 Fax: (330) 645-0070

Industrial Sales & Service Co.

4645 Gateway Circle Dayton, OH 45440 Phone: (513) 439-4131 Fax: (513) 439-5408

International Industrial Products

Tony Hoffman, Exec. V.P. 3611 Keystone Ave. Nashville, TN 37211 Phone: (615) 833-0666 Fax: (615) 834-8722

Johnson Corporation

Steve Manos, Marketing Specialist 805 Wood St. Three Rivers, MI 49093 Phone: (616) 278-1715 Fax: (616) 279-5980

Johnstone Engineering & Machine

Carmen J. Lauletta, Sec./Treas., Sales First Ave. and South Gay St. Parkesburg, PA 19365 Phone: (610) 857-5511 Fax: (610) 857-1425

Karder Rubber Machinery & Engineering

Daniel Abraham, Vice President David Supple, VP Sales 258 Kenmore Blvd. Akron, OH 44301 Phone: (330) 253-3377 Fax: (330) 253-4733

Karg Corporation

Michael J. McGeown, Vice President Sales & Marketing 241 Southwest Ave./P.O. Box 197 Tallmadge, OH 44278 Phone: (330) 633-4916 Fax: (330) 633-0235

Kiffer Industries Inc.

Walter M. Seidel, Business Director 4505 Rocky River Dr. Cleveland, OH 44135 Phone: (216) 267-1818, ext. 1101 Fax: (216) 267-1850

Killion Extruders, Inc.

Cabrina Potente, Director of Marketing 200 Commerce Rd. Cedar Grove, NJ 07009 Phone: (201) 239-0200 Fax: (201) 239-3061

Klockner Desma, KFD Sales and Service, Inc.

Hartmut Geisselbrecht, Gen. Mgr. 2835 Crescent Springs Rd. Erlanger, KY 41018 Phone: (606) 331-8900 Fax: (606) 331-6653

Kobelco Stewart Bolling Inc.

David A. Norman 1600 Terex Rd. Hudson, OH 44236 Phone: (330) 656-3111 Fax: (330) 656-3130

Krupp Rubber Machinery

William S. Bradshaw 1010 W. Main St. Kent, OH 44240 Phone: (330) 678-1118 Fax: (330) 673-2865

Lamac Process Co.

James K. Hoffman 4645 Gateway Circle Dayton, OH 45440 Phone: (513) 439-4131 Fax: (513) 439-5408

Lang Automation GmbH

1469 Bergisch-Gladbach Germany Phone: (2202) 93649-0 Fax: (2202) 93649-99

Lever Manufacturing Corp.

Thomas A. Huray 150 East Seventh St. Paterson, NJ 07524 Phone: (201) 684-5000 Phone: (800) 526-5265 Fax: (201) 742-8722

Lewco, Inc.

Ron Guerra, Vice President 706 Lane St. Sandusky, OH 44870 Phone: (419) 625-4014 Fax: (419) 625-3746

Lightnin, A Unit of General Signal

Jack Cassetta, Mgr., Mktg. Comm. P.O. Box 1370 135 Mt. Read Blvd. Rochester, NY 14603 Phone: (716) 436-5550 Fax: (716) 436-5589

Liquid Control Corp.

Kenneth A. Jacobs, Executive V.P. 7576 Freedom Ave., N.W. P.O. Box 2747 N. Canton, OH 44720 Phone: (330) 494-1313 Fax: (330) 494-5383

Littleford Day Inc.

Willian R. Barker, Product Manager 7451 Empire Dr. Florence, KY 41042-2985 Phone: (606) 525-7600 Fax: (606) 525-1446

C.A. Litzler, Co., Inc.

James Rogers 4800 West 160th St. Cleveland, OH 44135 Phone: (216) 267-8020 Fax: (216) 267-9856

LME-Beamech, Inc.

Eric Marsden, Vice President Creek Road Delanco, NJ 08075 P.O. Box 341 Riverside, NJ 08075 Phone: (609) 461-2620 Fax: (609) 461-6264

LumenX

Susan Houston, Product Mgr. 3400 Gilchrist Rd. Akron, OH 44309 Phone: (330) 798-4800 Fax: (330) 784-9854

LWB Sales & Service GmbH & Co. KG

David R. Bittner 730 Plum Industrial Ct. Pittsburgh, PA 15239 Phone: (412) 733-1942 Fax: (412) 733-1962

Machinery Reserve of Denver, Inc.

Alan C. Iannacito, President 404 Violet St. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 279-3933 Fax: (303) 279-4796

H. Maimin Co., Inc.

David S. Maimin, Jr. P.O. Box 549 Kent, CT 06757 Phone: (203) 927-4601 Fax: (203) 927-4703

Martz Mold & Machine, Inc.

Dennis Martz, V.P. 1365 Munroe Falls Ave. Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222-0192 Phone: (330) 928-2159 Fax: (330) 928-8124

Maxi-Blast, Inc.

Michael A. Golubski 630 E. Bronson St. South Bend, IN 46601 Phone: (219) 233-1161 Fax: (219) 234-0792

Max Muller Maschinen-und Formen-fabrik GmbH & Co. KG

Hans K.G. Muller, Managing Director Max-Muller-Str. 22 30179 Hannover, D Phone: (0511) 9 63 51 - 0 Fax: (0511) 9 63 51 - 11

McNeil & NRM, Inc.

John McCormick, V.P. Sales & Mktg. 96 E. Crosier St. Akron, OH 44311 Phone: (330) 253-2525 Fax: (330) 253-7022

Menzel, Inc.

Jack Wingo, Sales Manager 951 Simuel Rd. Spartanburg, SC 29304 Phone: (864) 576-5690 Fax: (864) 574-4570

Mesabi Control Engineering, Ltd.

John Beaudoin, Systems Product Mgr. 1350 Arcade St. St. Paul, MN 55106 Phone: (612) 771-1890 Fax: (612) 771-0437

Midland Tyre Machinery Co. Ltd.

A.D. Gibson, Managing Director Heath Mill Road Wombourne Wolverhampton, England WV5 8AH Phone: (01902) 324024 Fax: (01902) 324001

MIR USA Corp.

Fabio Galetti, Director 150 Industrial Rd. Leominster, MA 01453 Phone: (508) 537-4792 Fax: (508) 840-0031

Mitchell Inc.

E.P. Mitchell P.O. Box 413 Elkhart, IN 46515 Phone: (219) 295-3509 Fax: (219) 295-3798

Mitsui Machine Technology, Inc.

100 High Grove Blvd. Glendale Hts., IL 60139 Phone: (630) 924-8800 Fax: (630) 924-8879

MKB Industries Inc.

M.V. Blyth 63-8 N. Branford Rd. Branford, CT 06405 Phone: (203) 481-1900 Fax: (203) 481-1943

Modern Hydraulic Corp.

Nicholas Brodsky 780 Rt. #3 P.O. Box 4055 Clifton, NJ 07012-0455 Phone: (201) 777-0503 Fax: (201) 777-0451 Morehouse-Cowles Division Morehouse Industries Inc.

1600 West Commonwealth Ave. Fullerton, CA 92633 Phone: (714) 738-5000

Moriyama Corp.

Y. Kojima 586 Main St. Farmingdale, NY 11735 Phone: (516) 420-8016

Morse Manufacturing Co., Inc.

C. Lighthipe, Sales Manager P.O. Box 518 East Syracuse, NY 13057 Phone: (315) 437-8475 Fax: (315) 437-1029

MS Instrument Co., Inc.

Henry Maag 645 Harrisburg Rd. Stony Creek, NY 12878 Phone: (518) 696-2801 Fax: (518) 696-3281

National Feedscrew & Machining

William A. Wells 577 Oberlin Rd., S.W. Massillon, OH 44647 Phone: (330) 837-3868 Fax: (330) 837-2230

National Group of Companies

John West P.O. Box 2097 Lima, OH 45806 Phone: (419) 645-4133 Fax: (419) 645-5741

New Castle Industries

Fred Scocchera, V.P. Sales 1399 County Line Rd. New Castle, PA 16101 Phone: (412) 656-5600 Fax: (412) 656-5620

New Era Die Co.

Larry Ward 601 Maple St. Extension Red Lion, PA 17356 Phone: (717) 244-4586 Fax: (717) 244-2445

Ohio Blow Pipe Co.

Edward Fakeris 418 East 131st St. Cleveland, OH 44108 Phone: (216) 681-7379

Olympia Tool & Machine Co.

Arthur Scarpa, President 3848 Park Ave. Edison, NJ 08820 Phone: (908) 549-7856 Fax: (908) 754-7988

Op-AI Electric & Manufacturing Co.

C.R. Backus 1016 Ninth St. S.W. Canton, OH 44707 Phone: (330) 453-7786

Pacific Press and Shear, Inc.

Mike Stein, President 714 Walnut St. Mt. Carmel, IL 62863 Phone: (618) 262-8666 Fax: (618) 262-7000

Pathex International, Ltd.

Charles Kosa 609 Bank St., P.O. Box 520 Painesville, OH 44077 Phone: (216) 352-9381 Fax: (216) 352-1487

Perry Machinery

Gerald T. Fisher Mt. Laurel Rd. Hainesport, NJ 08036 Phone: (609) 267-1600 Fax: (609) 267-4986

PHI

Lloyd McFarlane, Sales Director 14955 E. Salt Lake Ave. Industry, CA 91746-9973 Phone: (818) 968-9686 Fax: (818) 333-3610

Piedmont Polymer Equipment

Robert Myers 1220 Olde Oaks Dr. Grays, TN 37615 Phone: (423) 753-7811 Fax: (423) 753-7911

Pomini, Inc.

Edward Sheehan, Sales & Eng. Mgr. 6400 W. Snowville Rd. Brecksville, OH 44141 Phone: (216) 838-0500 Fax: (216) 838-0618

Processall Inc.

Albert J. Shohet, Sales 10596 Springfield Pk. Cincinnati, OH 45215 Phone: (513) 771-2266 Fax: (513) 771-6767

Progressive Machine Co., Inc.

James Bognatz 21 Van Natta Dr. Ringwood, NJ 07456 Phone: (201) 962-7700 Fax: (201) 962-7714

Progressive Service Die Co.

Warren H. Duff 2720 Clark Ave. St. Louis, MO 63103 Phone: (314) 531-4300 Fax: (314) 531-4401

Quadra Inc.

James R. Braun 1833 Oakdale Ave. Racine, WI 53406 Phone: (414) 637-6525 Fax: (414) 637-6821

Recovery Technologies Inc.

Gary Mottershead, President 1225 Franklin Blvd. Cambridge, ON N1R 7E5 Phone: (519) 740-6801 Fax: (519) 740-6811

Reduction Technology, Inc.

Don Fornham, President Jim Pritchard, VP P.O. Box 297 Leeds, AL 35094-0297 Phone: (205) 699-6022 Fax: (205) 699-6025

Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery Co.

Thomas Liccardo, Sales Manager 2014 Union Turnpike North Bergen, NJ 07047 Phone: (201) 865-1073 or 865-2850 Fax: (201) 865-6878

REP Corp.

8N470 Tameling Ct. P.O. Box 8146 Bartlett, IL 60103 Phone: (847) 697-7210

J.A. Richards Co.

Norman B. Richards 903 North Pitcher St. Kalamazoo, MI 49007 Phone: (616) 343-4684 Fax: (616) 343-9133

RJS Corporation

R. Slezak 3400 Massillon Rd. Akron, OH 44312 Phone: (330) 896-2387 Fax: (330) 896-3282

RMS Corporation

Jerry Sinclair, Dir. Sales & Marketing 105 Glasgow St. P.O. Box 9001 Kitchener, Ontario, Canada N2G 4J4 Phone: (519) 749-4634 Fax: (519) 749-4613

Roller Equipment Mfg. Co., Inc.

13903 Norby Rd. Grandview, MO 64030 Phone: (816) 966-8717 Fax: (816) 761-3463

Charles Ross & Son Co., Inc.

Ronald W. Reid 710 Old Willets Path, P.O. Box 12308 Hauppauge, NY 11788 Phone: (516) 234-0500

Rubber Associated Machinery, Inc.

Omar Esmile, Sales P.O. Box 440 Akron, OH 44309 Warehouse: 1420 Develera Ave., Bldg. #4 Akron, OH 44309 Phone: (330) 645-6525 Fax: (330) 645-6394

Rubber City Machinery Corp.

Robert J. Westfall, Exec. V.P. & Sec. P.O. Box 2043 Akron, OH 44309 Phone: (330) 434-3500 Fax: (330) 434-2244

Rubber Molding Technology

Maurizio Coscia, President 36036 Lakeland Blvd. Eastlake, OH 44095 Phone: (216) 951-8625 Fax: (216) 951-6003

Ruf Machine Co., Inc.

Joseph A. Ruf 1816 Boston Rd. Bronx, NY 10460 Phone: (212) 542-1775 Fax: (212) 842-2580

Sandvik Process Systems, Inc.

James A. Schak, Mkt. and Sales Mgr. 409 Minnisink Rd. Totowa, NJ 07512 Phone: (201) 812-1066 Fax: (201) 812-0733

C.G. Sargent's Sons Division

P.O. Box 29505 Raleigh, NC 27626-0505 Phone: (919) 851-2000 Fax: (919) 851-6029

Scantland Industries

Joe Scantland 1092 N. Jacoby Rd. Akron, OH 44321 Phone: (330) 666-0518 Fax: (330) 666-8805

Herman Schwabe, Inc.

Jerrold M. Schwabe, President 147 Prince St. Brooklyn, NY 11201 Phone: (718) 237-1700 Fax: (718) 797-1033

Shaw-Almex USA Inc.

Robert Shaw, General Manager 3529 H. Church St. Clarkston, GA 30021 Phone: (404) 294-0574 Fax: (404) 294-4407

Siempelkamp Corp.

Bob Unser, Sales Engineer P.O. Box 4490 Marietta, GA 30061 Phone: (404) 424-4141

Simmons Engineering Corporation

Bruce G. Gillilan, President 1200 S. Willis Ave. Wheeling, IL 60090 Phone: (847) 419-9800 Fax: (847) 419-1500

Sivon Manufacturing Co.

C.E. Kieffer 3131 Perry Pk. Rd. Perry, OH 44081 Phone: (216) 259-5505 Fax: (216) 259-4602

Skinner Engine Company, Inc.

Robert McNabb, Jr., Mgr., Sales & Mktg. 337 West 12th St. Erie, PA 16512 Phone: (800) 458-0861 Phone: (814) 454-7103 Fax: (814) 454-7108

Soberay Machine & Equipment Co.

Ron Soberay 5500 Walworth Rd. Cleveland, OH 44102 Phone: (216) 281-0400 Fax: (216) 281-0409

South Bend Lathe, Inc.

Carmine Martino, Product Manager 400 West Sample St. South Bend, IN 46625 Phone: (219) 289-7771 Fax: (219) 236-1210

Spadone Machine Co., Inc.

Richard Voccola 507 Westport Ave. P.O. Box 5030 Norwalk, CT 06856 Phone: (203) 846-1677 Fax: (203) 847-4191

Stanford, Division, MAN Roland Inc.

Tim Andrews, Customer Service Mgr. Route 50 West P.O. Box 578 Salem, IL 62881 Phone: (618) 548-2600 Fax: (618) 548-6782

Starlinger North America

David P. Duginski, President 921 A.E.C. Dr. Wood Dale, IL 60191 Phone: (630) 238-1900 Fax: (630) 238-1903

Steelastic Company

Gary Richmond, Sales Manager 1557 Industrial Pkwy. Akron, OH 44310 Phone: (330) 633-0505 Fax: (330) 633-0527

Sterling Inc.

Wayne Lange, Product Manager 5200 W. Clinton Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53223 Phone: (414) 354-0970 Fax: (414) 354-6421

Technical Machine Products

Dave Sledz, Vice President 5500 Walworth Ave. Cleveland, OH 44102 Phone: (216) 281-9500 Fax: (216) 281-0408

Teledyne Readco

Terry McCoy 901 S. Richland Ave. P.O. Box 15552 York, PA 17405-0552 Phone: (800) 395-4959 Fax: (717) 848-2811

Testing Machines Inc.

Rosalie Strod, Advertising Manager 400 Bayview Ave. Amityville, NY 11701 Phone: (516) 842-5400 Fax: (516) 842-5220

Tidewater Machinery Co.

A.J. Lydic, President 3950 Woodthrush Rd. Akron, OH 44333 Phone: (330) 633-2745 Fax: (330) 666-1448

[Tomco.sub.2] Equipment Co.

Andrew Pazahanice 3340 Rosebud Rd. Loganville, GA 30249 Phone: (770) 979-8000 Fax: (770) 985-9179

Troester-Machinery Ltd.

Gerhard Folie, PR 300 Loomis Ave. Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221 Phone: (330) 928-7790 Fax: (330) 928-7239

Ttarp Industries, Inc.

Glenn Pratt, V.P. 338 Scajaquada St. Buffalo, NY 14211 Phone: (716) 894-5613 Fax: (716) 894-9568

United McGill Corporation

James Best, General Manager 170 East Broadway Westerville, OH 43081 Phone: (614) 882-5455 Fax: (614) 882-3428

U.S. Molding Machinery Co.

Zack Cohen 5855 Heisley Rd. Mentor, OH 44060 Phone: (216) 357-1150 Fax: (216) 357-0059

Utility Manufacturing Co, Inc.

Don Becker 6705 14th Ave. Kenosha, WI 53143 Phone: (414) 654-9220 Fax: (414) 657-7435

Venango Machine Company Inc.

Kenneth L. Johnson, President 14118 Route 8-89 Wattsburg, PA 16442 Phone: (814) 739-2211 Fax: (814) 739-2024

Versa Machinery Co.

Frances M. Blaikie P.O. Box 1980 Somerville, NJ 08876 Phone: (908) 526-6100 Fax: (908) 526-3295

Videx Equipment Corp.

John H. Hovey 170 Railroad Ave. Paterson, NJ 07501 Phone: (201) 742-2381 Fax: (201) 742-1452

VMI Americas

John T. Clark, V.P., Marketing/Sales 4485 Allen Road Stow, OH 44224 Phone: (330) 929-6800 Fax: (330) 929-7254

Voorwood

Jerry W. Voorhees P.O. Box 1127, 2350 Barney St. Anderson, CA 96007 Phone: (916) 365-3311

Wabash MPI

Keith Larson, Mgr., Sales and Mktg. 1569 Morris St., P.O. Box 298 Wabash, IN 46992-0298 Phone: (219) 563-1184 Fax: (219) 563-1396

Wean Industries, Inc.

O.L. Yeager, Sales Engineer 3805 Henricks Rd. Youngstown, OH 44501 Phone: (330) 797-2000 Fax: (330) 797-2068

Webber Manufacturing Co.

Peggy Lovett 8498 Brookville Rd., P.O. Box 19449 Indianapolis, IN 46219 Phone: (317) 357-8681 Fax: (317) 357-8685

Welding Engineers, Inc.

Susan Huges, Exec. Sec., Marketing & Sales 1600 Union Mtg. Rd. Blue Bell, PA 19422 Phone: (215) 643-6900 Fax: (215) 643-6960

Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest

Walter M. Haeder, President 1701 N. Topeka Blvd. P.O. Box 8250 Topeka, KS 66608 Phone: (913) 235-2336 Fax: (913) 235-1331

West Coast Rubber Machinery

George Schofhauser, President Jim Narducci, Sales Manager 7180 Scout Ave. Bell Gardens, CA 90201 Phone: (310) 927-2546 Fax: (310) 806-4628

Western Supplies Co.

Donald Altvater, Jr. 2920 Cass Ave. St. Louis, MO 63106 Phone: (314) 531-0100 Fax: (314) 531-0126

Williams-White & Co.

Robert Crane, Product Manager 600 River Dr. Moline, IL 61265 Phone: (309) 797-7650, ext. 233 Fax: (309) 797-7655 Fax: (309) 797-7677

Wolverine Corp.

Ron Baser, V.P., Sales 51 E. Main St. Merrimac, MA 01860 Phone: (508) 346-4541 Fax: (508) 346-4213

Wyko Inc.

Ian Smith P.O. Box 130 Greenback, TN 37742 Phone: (423) 856-2317 Fax: (423) 856-2092

Wyssmont Co., Inc.

J. Befacqua 1470 Bergen Blvd., P.O. Box 1397 Fort Lee, NJ 07024 Phone: (201) 947-4600 Fax: (201) 947-0324

Used, rebuilt machinery suppliers

The following directory lists the suppliers of used and rebuilt processing machinery to the rubber industry, with address, contact person and type (s) of machinery offered. Rebuilding capabilities are listed on the following two pages.

Akron Tire Engineering & Machine

Erich Dorfner, Owner 1288 Starlight Dr. Akron, OH 44306 Phone: (330) 724-0343 Fax: (330) 724-0347 Types of machinery: All types

Alkar

Jim Broch, President 1225 E. Summit St. Alliance, OH 44601-3234 Phone: (216) 821-4537 Fax: (216) 821-1261 Types of machinery: Rebuilders of all types, including presses, post inflators, mills, tire building presses, internal mixers, calenders, etc.

Alsop Industrial Services

Don Alsop, President 1535 E. Naomi St. P.O. Box 33802 Indianapolis, IN 46203 Phone: (317) 783-0885 Fax: (317) 783-0891 Types of machinery: Extruders, tire building equipment, calenders, vulcanizing presses, mills, tube equipment and molds, autoclaves.

ASB Industries, Inc.

John Lindeman Charles M. Kay 1031 Lambert St. Barberton, OH 44203-1689 Phone: (330) 753-8458 Fax: (330) 753-7550 Types of machinery: Presses

Bambeck Auctioneers

Dave Bambeck, Auction Manager 3061 Steel Road NW Dover, OH 44622 Phone: (330) 343-1437 Types of machinery: Auctioneers of high-intensity solids mixers, extruding machines, calendering machines and vulcanizing presses, etc. Auction marketing of complete plants or partial liquidations

Barwell

Kendall Ashby, President 484 Tacoma Ave. Tallmadge, OH 44278 Phone: (330) 633-5734 Fax: (330) 633-6367 Types of machinery: Extruders, pre-formers, dusters, granulators, injection presses and rebuilding machines

E.H. Benz Co., Inc.

Ted Benz, President 73 Maplehurst Ave. Providence, RI 02908 Phone: (401) 331-5650 Fax: (401) 331-5685 Types of machinery: Tensile testers, rheometers, viscometers, impact testers, abraders, brittlepoint, test tube alum block ovens, plastometers, molds, dies, presses Charleston Auctioneers Randy Harvey, V.P., Operations 205 E. Collins Dr. Ft. Wayne, IN 46825 Phone: (219) 482-5252 Fax: (219) 482-5551 Types of machinery: Auctioneers of rubber processing machinery and presses

Davey Industries Richard Schaack, President P.O. Box 493 155 S. Water St. Kent, OH 44240-0493 Phone: (330) 678-5555 Fax: (330) 678-6289 Types of machinery: All types

Davis-Standard Daniel Szewc, Business Area Mgr,, Elastomers 1 Extrusion Dr. Pawcatuck, CT 06379 Phone: (860) 599-6365 Fax: (860) 599-6258 Types of machinery: Extruders

Ensine Soroosh Khoshbin, President 2743 Second St. Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44221 Phone: (330) 928-1178 Types of machinery: Extruders, injection molding, blow molding, polymerizers, cutters

Epco Steve Schroeder 2225 Cedar St. Fremont, OH 43420 Phone: (419) 334-2631 Fax: (419) 334-2822 Types of machinery: Presses, mills, calenders, extruders, mixers

Equipment Equities S.L. Shaper, President 866 UN Plaza New York, NY 10017 Phone: (212) 688-8800 Types of machinery: Mills, extruders, mixers, cutters

Erie Mill and Press John A. Nowak, President Greg Maus, Vice President 953 E. 12th St. Erie, PA 16503 Phone: (814) 454-1581 Fax: (814) 454-7913 Types of machinery: Presses, mills, extruders, calenders and auxiliary equipment

Farrel Hans U. Baurmeister, Director, Remanufacturing Operations 25 Main St. Ansonia, CT 06401-1601 Phone: (203) 736-5500 Fax: (203) 735-6267 Types of machinery: All types

Federal Equipment Michael Kadis, President Larry Kadis, Vice President 8200 Bessemer Ave. Cleveland, OH 44127 Phone: (216) 271-3500 Fax: (216) 271-5210 Types of machinery: All types

Michael Fox Auctioneers David S. Fox, President 3835 Naylors Lane Baltimore, MD 21208 Phone: (301) 653-4000 Phone: (800) 722-3334 Types of machinery: Auctioneers of all types of machinery

GM Machinery Associates Steven Gries, President 601 Jefferson Rd. Parsippany, NJ 07054 Phone: (201) 884-4500 Fax: (201) 884-9009 Types of machinery: Presses, mills, mixers, calenders, cutters, tubers, extruders, vulcanizers

Gomaplast Machinery, Inc. Marcelo S. Hildebrandt 500 E. Henry St. Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: (330) 263-7845 Fax: (330) 263-7846 Types of machinery: All types

Hancock Engineering Inc. Robert B. Hancock, President Charles M. Stankye, Jr., V.P., Mfg. Frank A. Pascuzzo, V.P. Sales & Mktg. 150 E. Aurora St. Waterbury, CT 06708 Phone: (203) 757-4221 Fax: (203) 757-2709 Types of machinery: Mixers, mills, calenders, extruders, presses

Hudson Machinery Jay Esterkes, Exec. Vice President 32 Stevens St. Haverhill, MA 01830 Phone: (508) 374-0303 Fax: (508) 373-7295 Types of machinery: Extruders

Hunter Hydraulics L.R. Hunter, President 2512 Columbus Rd., N.E. P.O. Box 7117 Canton, OH 44705 Phone: (216) 455-3983 Types of machinery: Vulcanizing presses

Industrial Rubber Machinery Larry Weber, President 503 Portage Lakes Dr., Suite 2 Akron, OH 44319 Phone: (330) 645-0020 Fax: (330) 645-0070 Types of machinery: All types

Jarvis Industries Jim Jarvis, President 1189 Newton St. Akron, OH 44305 Phone: (330) 798-0270 Fax: (330) 798-9642 Types of machinery: Presses

JLN Corp. Wendell Watson 28 Bowditch Dr. Worcester, MA 01605 Phone: (508) 853-4406 Fax: (508) 856-9256 Types of machinery: All types

Johnson Machinery Dennis DeDomenico, V.P. Marty Hartman, Sales Manager P.O. Box 3216 Wallington, NJ 07057 Phone: (201) 473-3800 Fax: (201-473-8316 Types of machinery: Compression molding presses

Karder Rubber Machinery & Engineering 258 Kenmore Blvd. Akron, OH 44301 Phone: (330) 253-3377 Fax: (330) 253-4733 Types of machinery: Mills, calenders, internal mixers, presses, extruders, speed reducers, spare rolls and gears, lab equipment

Kobelco Stewart Bolling David A. Norman, V.P. Sales 1600 Terex Rd. Hudson, OH 44236 Fax: (330) 656-9724 Phone: (330) 655-3111 Types of machinery: Mills, calenders, mixers, tire presses, extruders, bale cutters, pelletizers, auxiliary equipment and turnkey engineering

L&F Industries Robert Jones, Vice President, Sales 2110 Belgrave Ave. Huntington Park, CA 90255 Phone: (213) 588-2231 Fax: (213) 588-2237 Types of machinery: Presses, mills

Machinery Exchange Corp. Bob Thompson, President P.O. Box 26073 Akron, OH 44319 Phone: (330) 896-0585 Fax: (330) 896-0147 Types of machinery: All types; liquidators of tire and rubber plants

Mickmyer Cryogenics R.J. Meyers, President 4620 N. Milton St. Shoreview, MN 55126-5815 Phone: (612) 481-1370 Fax: (612) 484-3414 Types of machinery: New and used cryogenic deflashing equipment

M.I.R. Inc. Philip J. Sponheimer, President 103 Breault Rd.; P.O. Box 216 Beacon Falls, CT 06403 Phone: (800) 833-3707 Phone: (203) 888-2541 Fax: (203) 888-5294 Types of machinery: Internal mixers, mills, calenders, presses

National Group of Companies Dick Fischer, General Sales Mgr. P.O. Box 2097 Lima, OH 45806 Phone: (800) 223-6653 Phone: (419) 645-5741 www.nationalgroup.com national@worcnet.gen.oh.us Types of machinery: Tire retreading, repairing and recycling equipment

Nerpco Richard Barnes, President 534 Bethmour Rd. Bethany, CT 06525 Phone: (203) 393-3686 Types of machinery: Mills, calenders, internal mixers, presses, extruder sheet take-off machines, guillotine bale cutters

Reliable Rubber & Plastic Machinery 2008-14 Union Tpke. North Bergen, NJ 07047 Phone: (201) 865-2850 or 865-1073 Fax: (201) 865-6878 Types of machinery: Mills, internal mixers, hydraulic presses, pumps, extruders, strainers, lab equipment

Rubber & Plastic Machinery Arthur S. Brudner, President/Owner 673 Robeson St. Fall River, MA 02720 Phone: (508) 672-6960 Fax: (508) 676-0141 Types of machinery: Internal mixers, mills, presses, injection molding machines, calenders, cryogenic shotblast deflashing, batch-off and strip-handling systems, extruders and mixer feeders

Rubber City Machinery Bob Westfall, Exec. V.P./Sec. P.O. Box 2043; 1000 Sweitzer Ave. Akron, OH 44309 Phone: (330) 434-3500 Types of machinery: Mills, compression presses, calenders, extruders, intensive mixers

Skinner Engine Robert McNabb, Jr., Manager Sales & Marketing 337 W. 12th St. Erie, PA 16501 Phone: (800) 458-0861 Phone: (814) 454-7103 Fax: (814) 454-7108 Types of machinery: Intensive batch mixers

Soberay Machines Ron Soberay, Exec. Vice President 5500 Walworth Ave. Cleveland, OH 44102-4400 Phone: (216) 281-0400 Fax: (216) 281-0408 Types of machinery: Internal mixers, mills, calenders, extruders, presses

Solomon Machinery D.E. Solomon, President 1036 Westwood Rd. Woodmere, NY 11598 Phone: (516) 957-1500 Types of machinery: Extruders and braiders

Stuart Equipment 2300 Commonwealth Ave. P.O. Box 469 North Chicago, IL 60064 Phone: (708) 473-4500 Fax: (708) 473-4504 Types of machinery: Two roll mills, mixers, intensive mixers

U.S. Molding Machinery Zack Cohen, President Bob Luck, V.P., Engineering 5855 Heisley Rd. Mentor, OH 44060 Phone: (216) 357-1150 Fax: (216) 357-0059 Types of machinery: Rubber injection molding presses and all types of rubber molding presses

Vander-Kemp Division H.L. Kempler, Vice President 2461 Greenleaf Ave. Elk Grove, IL 60007-5571 Phone: (708) 864-8610 Fax: (708) 640-0431 Types of machinery: All types

Videx Equipment John Hovey, President 170 Railroad Ave. Paterson, NJ 07501 Phone: (201) 742-2381 Fax: (201) 742-1452 Types of machinery: Extruders, wire and cable

Werner & Pfleiderer - Midwest Juergun Pohl, President P.O. Box 8250 1701 N. Topeka Blvd. Topeka, KS 66608 Phone: (913) 235-2336 Fax: (913) 235-1331 Types of machinery: Mixers, extruders, beadwrappers, rotary pusher, process controls, mills

West Coast Rubber Machinery George Schofhauser, President Jim Narducci, Director, Sales and Mkt. 7180 Scout Ave. Bell Gardens, CA 90201 Phone: (562) 927-2546 Fax: (562) 806-4628 Types of machinery: All types
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Author:Gooch, Lawrence R.
Publication:Rubber World
Date:Jul 1, 1997
Words:13352
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