Printer Friendly

Update 2: NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS].

NASA unveiled  a series of satellite images of the current Mississippi flooding that could reach depths of 20 feet in the coming weeks. NASA's fleet of Earth-observing satellites have been gathering data on the current Mississippi flooding as well as floods worldwide.

<a href="http://hken.ibtimes.com/articles_slideshows/144301/20110512/nasa-captures-mississippi-flooding-photos.htm" target="_blank">Click here to view all photos. </a>

<a href="http://hken.ibtimes.com/articles/142514/20110507/nasa-unveils-damage-path-april-tornadoes-in-alabama.htm" target="_blank">NASA Unveils Damage Path of April Tornadoes in Alabama</a>

The Mississippi River reached nearly 48 feet in Memphis, Tenn., on May 10, according to the U.S. National Weather Service. It was the highest water level for Memphis since 1937.

The Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper captured an image on May 10 showing in natural color the area around Memphis as it would look to the human eye.

This month muddy water has pushed over the Mississippi's banks both east and west of the normal river channel. Flood waters span the distance between Memphis and West Memphis. Another Landsat 5 image from April 21, 2010 (bottom), shows non-flooded conditions.

<div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="99369" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="Update 2: NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/17/99369.jpg" alt="(Up) Landsat 5 shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA //Remotely sensed data are not the only science endeavors occurring due to floods. The USGS collects river data through its network of about 7,700 stream gauges around the Nation. You can receive instant, customized updates about water conditions, including flooding, by subscribing to USGS WaterAlert. The scenes captured by Landsat 5 show the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area, and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas. The May 2006 images show the river before it began to flood. In the May images, the dark blue tones are water, the light green is cleared fields, and the light tones are clouds." width="630" /> <div class="caption">(Up) Landsat 5 shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA //Remotely sensed data are not the only science endeavors occurring due to floods. The USGS collects river data through its network of about 7,700 stream gauges around the Nation. You can receive instant, customized updates about water conditions, including flooding, by subscribing to USGS WaterAlert. The scenes captured by Landsat 5 show the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area, and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas. The May 2006 images show the river before it began to flood. In the May images, the dark blue tones are water, the light green is cleared fields, and the light tones are clouds.</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="99367" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="Update 2: NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/17/99367.jpg" alt="(Up) Landsat 5 shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA //Remotely sensed data are not the only science endeavors occurring due to floods. The USGS collects river data through its network of about 7,700 stream gauges around the Nation. You can receive instant, customized updates about water conditions, including flooding, by subscribing to USGS WaterAlert. The scenes captured by Landsat 5 show the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area, and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas. The May 2006 images show the river before it began to flood. In the May images, the dark blue tones are water, the light green is cleared fields, and the light tones are clouds." width="630" /> <div class="caption">(Up) Landsat 5 shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image shows the Mississippi River along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA //Remotely sensed data are not the only science endeavors occurring due to floods. The USGS collects river data through its network of about 7,700 stream gauges around the Nation. You can receive instant, customized updates about water conditions, including flooding, by subscribing to USGS WaterAlert. The scenes captured by Landsat 5 show the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area, and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas. The May 2006 images show the river before it began to flood. In the May images, the dark blue tones are water, the light green is cleared fields, and the light tones are clouds.</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="99354" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="Update 2: NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/17/99354.jpg" alt="(Up) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA" width="630" /> <div class="caption">(Up) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="99357" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="Update 2: NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/17/99357.jpg" alt="(UP) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA" width="630" /> <div class="caption">(UP) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 12, 2006. (bottom) Landsat 5 image of the Mississippi River in the Memphis, Tenn. area on May 10, 2011. Credit: USGS/NASA</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="98762" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/16/98762.jpg" alt="ISS027-E-027019 (12 May 2011) --- Parts of two states highly impacted by recent flooding of the Mississippi River, are pictured in this International Space Station image featuring an area east of Blytheville, Ark., off the right side of the image. Center point coordinates are located at 35.8 degrees north latitude and 89.7 degrees west longitude The areas of Ruckers Place, Tenn. and Tomato, Ark. are surrounded by water, while Barfield, Ark. is still dry behind the levee on the right side of the image. North is toward the bottom of the photo." width="630" /> <div class="caption">ISS027-E-027019 (12 May 2011) --- Parts of two states highly impacted by recent flooding of the Mississippi River, are pictured in this International Space Station image featuring an area east of Blytheville, Ark., off the right side of the image. Center point coordinates are located at 35.8 degrees north latitude and 89.7 degrees west longitude The areas of Ruckers Place, Tenn. and Tomato, Ark. are surrounded by water, while Barfield, Ark. is still dry behind the levee on the right side of the image. North is toward the bottom of the photo.</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="98755" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/16/98755.jpg" alt="ISS027-E-027023 (12 May 2011) --- An Expedition 27 crew member aboard the International Space Station, 220 miles above Earth and the Mississippi River, captured this May 12 still photo, clearly showing the outlines of some heavily flooded agricultural fields on the Missouri side of the river. The center point for this 400-mm frame is 36.27 degrees north latitude and 89.57 degrees west longitude (north of Caruthersville, Mo. and west of Ridgely, Tenn.). North is towards the lower right corner of the image." width="630" /> <div class="caption">ISS027-E-027023 (12 May 2011) --- An Expedition 27 crew member aboard the International Space Station, 220 miles above Earth and the Mississippi River, captured this May 12 still photo, clearly showing the outlines of some heavily flooded agricultural fields on the Missouri side of the river. The center point for this 400-mm frame is 36.27 degrees north latitude and 89.57 degrees west longitude (north of Caruthersville, Mo. and west of Ridgely, Tenn.). North is towards the lower right corner of the image.</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96856" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96856.jpg" alt="Mississippi floodwaters inundate Memphis, Tenn., on May 10 as seen by the Landsat 5 satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 21, 2010. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory/United States Geological Survey)" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Mississippi floodwaters inundate Memphis, Tenn., on May 10 as seen by the Landsat 5 satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 21, 2010. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory/United States Geological Survey)</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96857.jpg" alt="Mississippi floodwaters inundate Memphis, Tenn., on May 10 as seen by the Landsat 5 satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 21, 2010. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory/United States Geological Survey)" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Mississippi floodwaters inundate Memphis, Tenn., on May 10 as seen by the Landsat 5 satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 21, 2010. (Credit: NASA Earth Observatory/United States Geological Survey)</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96863" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96863.jpg" alt="Flooding in Arkansas as seen on May 10 by NASA's Aqua satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 29, 2011. (Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team)" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Flooding in Arkansas as seen on May 10 by NASA's Aqua satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 29, 2011. (Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team)</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96865" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96865.jpg" alt="Flooding in Arkansas as seen on May 10 by NASA's Aqua satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 29, 2011. (Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team)" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Flooding in Arkansas as seen on May 10 by NASA's Aqua satellite (top image). The bottom image shows the same view from April 29, 2011. (Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team)</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96866" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96866.jpg" alt="Flooding From Mississippi River Levee Breach The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers detonated explosives at the Birds Point levee near Wyatt, Missouri, at 10:02 p.m. on May 2, 2011. Water from the intentional breach flooded a 130,000-acre stretch of land. Two more breaches were detonated on May 3 and 5. This image from the Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft shows the resultant flooding of farmland west of the Mississippi 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of the levee breach. On the image, vegetation is displayed in red, bare fields in gray and water in blue. The image covers an area of 30.7 by 39 miles (49.5 by 63 kilometers), and is located near 36.5 degrees north latitude, 89.4 degrees west longitude. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region and its high spatial resolution of about 50 to 300 feet, or about 15 to 90 meters, ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on Terra. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and, measuring surface heat balance. " width="630" /> <div class="caption">Flooding From Mississippi River Levee Breach The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers detonated explosives at the Birds Point levee near Wyatt, Missouri, at 10:02 p.m. on May 2, 2011. Water from the intentional breach flooded a 130,000-acre stretch of land. Two more breaches were detonated on May 3 and 5. This image from the Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft shows the resultant flooding of farmland west of the Mississippi 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of the levee breach. On the image, vegetation is displayed in red, bare fields in gray and water in blue. The image covers an area of 30.7 by 39 miles (49.5 by 63 kilometers), and is located near 36.5 degrees north latitude, 89.4 degrees west longitude. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region and its high spatial resolution of about 50 to 300 feet, or about 15 to 90 meters, ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on Terra. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and, measuring surface heat balance.</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96870" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96870.jpg" alt="Flooding at the Junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers /NASA Earth Observatory" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Flooding at the Junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers /NASA Earth Observatory</div> </div> <div class="imageBox" style="width: 630px;"><img id="96871" class="imgPhoto magnify" title="NASA Captures Mississippi Flooding [PHOTOS]" src="http://img.ibtimes.com/www/data/images/full/2011/05/11/96871.jpg" alt="Flooding at the Junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers /NASA Earth Observatory" width="630" /> <div class="caption">Flooding at the Junction of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers /NASA Earth Observatory</div> </div>
COPYRIGHT 2011 International Business Times
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2011 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:International Business Times - US ed.
Geographic Code:1U7AR
Date:May 17, 2011
Words:2730
Previous Article:Manchester United - Will Paul Scholes retire in the summer?
Next Article:Syria Government denies Deera a[euro]oemass gravea[euro] as clashes with the population continue.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |