Printer Friendly

Understanding the role of organizational factors in shaping the research careers of women academics in higher education/Comprender el rol de los factores organizativos que influyen sobre las carreras exitosas de las mujeres investigadoras en las universidades.

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Factors influencing the research careers

Research activity has been identified as one of the most important academic activities (Hobson, Jones & Deane, 2005) with significant studies being done by researchers in the field of educational organization. The authors' attention was focused on the performance indicators of academic staff engaged in research activities (e.g. Bruneau & Savage, 2002; Morley, 2003), including such aspects as number of publications, budgets for research projects, and the dissemination of results. All these factors can become significant in determining promotion to higher professional levels, or obtaining professional prestige.

While the literature shows that some progress has been made with regard to the level of women's participation in higher education, a distinct gender-based differentiation of roles still exists within universities (Sagaria & Agans, 2006; Smeby & Try, 2005). For example, it has been suggested that women are more commonly associated with teaching activities while men are more likely to achieve recognition both for their research and for their management abilities (Bagilhole, 2007; Tomas, Duran, Guillarmon & Lavie, 2008). Other issues arise too concerning the different circumstances that lead women to have lower research productivity levels (Walby & Olsen, 2002) and the identification of the obstacles faced by women in their research careers. Among these obstacles stands out the fact that women have less confidence in their own skills and do not enjoy the same degree of access to academic networks as men (Doherty & Manfredi, 2005). Women consequently have less access to funding for research (Lafferty & Fleming, 2000) and have fewer resources and fewer research staff (Toren, 1993).

Despite the obstacles mentioned above, there are successful women academics and some of them have achieved considerable professional recognition. It is enlightening to identify the factors which are instrumental in enabling female academics to succeed. Whereas obstacles to success have been widely researched, little research has been conducted into the factors associated with the success of women in leadership research positions.

Some relevant studies have been published both internationally and inside Spain and Catalonia, though. Some of the significant influences identified include the study about the concept of researcher development with a special focus on female leaders (Evans, 2012), the impact of training programs and their role in promoting professional development; the importance of acquiring research skills (Devos, 2007, amongst others); and mentoring programs (Higgs, 2003; Guillarmon, 2011). Other aspects related to building a successful career are the prevailing organizational culture and the social context (Dever & Morrison, 2009).

When the factors influencing research activity are investigated, the literature usually focuses on the individual level. Most studies concentrate on the effects caused by the individual determinants of academic success upon research (e.g. Stephan & Levin, 1997). Studies on how academic research is produced therefore need to acknowledge organizational and group factors, focusing on the context where research teams operate (Stephan & Levin, 1997) and examining the way in which the quality of fellow researchers belonging to the same team or group can represent a crucial factor in the success and productivity of individuals (Carayol & Matt, 2004).

1.2 Organizational factors and their influence on the research career

Whilst a large and growing body of literature investigating the factors that influence productivity at an individual level has begun to appear, only a few studies have so far looked at research groups as factors affecting research success.

The research group represents the most characteristic organizational "micro" unit and very plastic entity with diffuse contours in some cases. Research groups are functional organizational units, directly associated with scientific research. There is no consensus, neither on the definition of research groups nor on its differentiation from groups of researchers in different organizational units. Some authors assimilate the group to a functional, organizational unit (Carayol & Matt, 2004; Lazega, Mounier, Jourda, & Stofer, 2006). They have the capacity for self-organization and self-regulation (Rocha, Martin Sampere, & Sebastian, 2008) and their dynamics are subject to a variety of influences.

Some studies by Nowotny (1989) show the existence of multiple relationships and dependences of researchers on the scientific-technical systems, especially in relation to the dynamics of their colleagues and the evolution of different disciplines and research areas. Groups present clear advantages for research development, especially given the importance of complementarity and critical mass for certain functions. The performance of research groups is both quantitatively and qualitatively influenced, not only by individual characteristics of researchers but also by collective and contextual factors. The organizational context in which groups and researchers work significantly influences the work patterns, as well as the research cultures and dynamics. Broad contextual factors such as the discipline or scientific field, the organizational context, and the institution's prestige determine the degree of autonomy and flexibility, the financial support for research, the procedures and the assessment criteria--all of them factors which ultimately determine the productivity.

In the light of the aforementioned research, our study was designed to investigate the specific organisation factors, strategies, and work cultures associated with female academic success in the Catalan context.

2 METHODOLOGY

2.1 The research scenario

In the current university context, where academic performance and rankings are key indicators, the academic world is searching for ways to improve research capacity and productivity. Catalan universities endorse this paradigm, and their perspective has recently shifted towards an increasing emphasis on the publication of research works. Furthermore, there is pressure not only to publish but also to secure external and internal grant funding in order to ensure that future research is financially secure. Before this situation, the Catalan government through its University Quality Agency has developed an assessment model based on the overall performance of a research group, focusing particularly on the group leader's merits. Those groups have come to be known as "Consolidated Research Groups" (CRGs): each group receives public funding according to the quality of their work according to yearly academic performance reviews.

The criteria used by the Agency give particular weight to the number of publications produced by the group members and the academic prestige of the journals in which they appear. The group leader is a key figure and his/her performance is a significant determining factor in obtaining an excellent rating. Therefore, successful researchers can be defined on the basis of their CRG leadership and the number of successful applications for research funding (from within their university, from the Catalan government or from external sources). Sixty-five percent of CRGs in Catalonia are led by men, as opposed to thirty-five percent led by women.

Taking this context into account, our study focuses on analyzing group factors which have a positive impact upon the success of CRG women leaders in their academic field.

The methodology comprised interviews with the participants, who are all actively engaged in research and have achieved a degree of public recognition in their respective fields. The interview guidelines were validated by means of pilot testing and evaluation, as well as through consultation with senior colleagues. A qualitative approach was used to analyze the interviews and explore participants' perceptions of their experience in developing a successful professional research career.

2.2 Setting and Participants

Fourteen women who held leading positions in social science CRGs and worked at Catalonian public universities took part in the present study. These women's ages ranged from 30 to 60 years and their professional status varied from lecturer to associate professor and senior professor. Most of our participants were senior professors and only one was a lecturer. The groups included both women and men, all of them academics; they contained between 7 and 20 people and were composed by academics from the same field of knowledge. In the Spanish academic system, academics are obliged to fulfil three roles simultaneously: teaching, research and management. Usually the lecturers are obliged to undertake more teaching hours than associate professors or senior professors, who dedicate more time to the research activity or management.

Internal validity was ensured by the selection of informants using the following criteria: length of experience in management positions, type of research groups (different size and origin--different knowledge field within social sciences), and different typology of its leaders. This guaranteed that our interviewees conformed to a wide variety of profiles.

2.3 Data collection

Each participant was interviewed once and each interview lasted approximately 45 minutes. The interviews were conducted in Catalan and Spanish at interviewees' working places, and were tape-recorded and later transcribed.

The interviews were semi-structured, with a set of flexible guidelines adapted to the particular characteristics of the different disciplines cultivated by participants.

The interview guidelines addressed the following topics:

--The background and context which provide the professional framework of the research team leader.

--The role of research and its impact on other professional functions (its integration with teaching and management).

--The researcher's perception of factors contributing to her success (individual, group, and institutional factors).

--The culture and dynamics of the working environment (level of collaboration with the research group members, group climate, mutual support, career development, etc.).

--The group's training function (the formative role of the research group, career development of junior researchers, etc.).

2.4 Data analyses

Qualitative information analyses were carried out using MAXQDA 2007 software. Initial data analysis enabled the identification of key areas based on research topics, which were subjected to further scrutiny in order to determine each topic's components and the significance and meaning that the group and its leader attached to each one of those components.

The information was analyzed under the following categories:

--Building the research group.

--The role of research in academic life.

--The research-teaching nexus.

--The research-management nexus.

--Group culture.

--Work dynamics inside the group.

--The group leader's role in the career development of junior researchers.

--Leadership style.

--The group's formative role.

Much of the information provided by participants appears in the form of direct quotations during the analysis. Pseudonyms have been used throughout the study in order to ensure participants' confidentiality.

3 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The interviews revealed a set of factors associated with successful careers for women researchers: training for research, interest and motivation, the choices that they have made throughout their careers, the different stages in their academic careers, the time spent abroad, and the role of 'mentors' in assisting the development of their academic profile. In addition to these, group factors had an impact on the quality of interpersonal relationships within a research group--for instance, the working culture within the group, networks and the degree of institutional support received from academic heads.

Some of the most significant areas of this research examined the way in which female researchers defined their first steps in the research career, how they managed key milestones in their careers, how they developed their status as well-established researchers, and also their ability to ensure that the work of ongoing research programs was continued by new researchers.

Rocha, Martin Sampere and Sebastian (2008) identified the key relationship between individual and the group factors: "Individual and collective productivity is primarily influenced by the organizational context, which provides the template for such things as ways of working, research culture and the direction and impetus of work, which in turn shapes the work of both the group and the individual researcher."

The focus in our study is on the group factors which can influence the career development of women researchers. The results have been organized according to the central research themes, illustrating our finding with quotations from the participants. Details about the age and academic position of contributors are also included in order to provide contextual information that enables a more accurate understanding of their statements.

3.1 How research groups are formed and how they function

Firstly, the analysis of participants' opinions was focused on the group development process and its internal dynamics. Several stages could be identified in the research career along these lines. Our participants indicated that they initially preferred to work alone in the starting phase of their career and it was only as they advanced in their careers that they began to join other researchers. Participants characterise this moment as a period of reflection and construction of their own ideas, of consolidation in research interests and correlation with other researchers' interests.

Secondly, participants specify the strategies used in order to build research groups. In this sense, there are two types of groups: those built around a senior researcher and those formed by the gathering of a group of researchers.

The evolution cycle of groups includes processes such as construction and disaggregation, inclusion of new members or dissolution according to the interests or personal trajectories of their members. Groups are thus different in size during their existence. Our participants noted that as a group increases in size, there will be a tendency for it to be divided into smaller groups, each one focusing on a different specific research topic. Amongst the factors identified by our participants as driving this process of segmentation and dissolution are: the academic development of researchers who seek greater independence and wish to exercise their own leadership; the appearance of incompatibilities and conflicts that inevitably arise in collective enterprises; the development of new research interests among researchers, and the emergence of new opportunities for professional development. The optimal size of groups and the potential benefits of resource concentration appear as particularly controversial aspects. This topic has been analyzed by several authors. Seglen & Aksnes (2000) examined group size and the relations that this has with research productivity. Von Tunzelman, Ranga, Martin and Geuna (2003) conclude in a review of the effects that size has on research performance that studies about the connection between size and productivity provide little convincing evidence linking these factors and advocate policies to encourage interaction between small units research to counter the problem of 'loneliness' as opposed to 'nitpick.'

The internal relationships as well as social integration within the group are related to factors such as group stability, cohesion and synergy. The social integration of researchers has been studied mainly at the "macro" and "meso" research organization, much less the research groups. The studies by Nowotny (1989) reveal the existence of multiple relationships and dependences of researchers on scientific-technical systems, especially in relation to the dynamics of their colleagues and the evolution of different disciplines and research areas.

The forces that maintain cohesion within research groups have to do with the degree of satisfaction among its members in terms of motivations, professional expectations and scientific goals. Cohesion is also related to sharing a group culture where leadership, interests, work habits, communication and information flows, along with competitiveness levels, are satisfactory for all group members. In this respect, some of the participants reported that it was very important to ensure the progression and personal development of researchers and they felt that this was linked to the recognition of individual diversity inside the group. In the participants' words, professional success is linked to progression and timing, and it depends on the particular personality of each member in the research group:

You need to be flexible; each person has a different rhythm. I think we need to recognize that one person's contribution to a working group can be very different from someone else's. Some people work at a very fast pace, while others might proceed at a slower pace and don't publish much, even though they have a lot of knowledge to draw on (Maria, 56, senior professor, highlighted one of the participants).

The group offers its members mutual help and moral support. According to our participants, commitment to research and to the other group members is a key factor in achieving successful research outcomes:

Teamwork is the key to success. You need to know how to ensure that a team that has a good atmosphere, as effective cooperation is essential. So now we have a core of researchers who have acquired enough experience to undertake their own research projects (Carmen, 34, associate professor).

The group's horizontal structure provides its members with a forum--where they can meet and discuss their concerns about research and academic life in general. As one participant put it:

Well, I think that working together, collaborating instead of competing with each other is very important--the fact that people are working towards a common goal. I've always encouraged group members to show a lot of initiative (Joana, 45, associate professor).

These responses illustrate how groups serve as spaces where members can build their confidence, acquire greater responsibility, and provide a sense of community that enhances everyone's participation in the group. Lave and Wenger (1991) argue that individuals acquire respect, expertise and an identity that is valued by the community through an immersion in its environment and the participation in its practices. It is through integration into the research community that inexperienced researchers become familiar with the values, practices and knowledge of a group.

In line with the findings of Davis (2001) regarding the academic community, members acquire respect and status, intellectual capital actually, also as a result of working in a research team under the guidance of an experienced researcher. This sense of community was identified by our participants as extremely significant--since they believed that a well-functioning research group provides scope for all group members to make a contribution:

I think we need to recognize that one person's contribution to a working group can be very different from someone else's, but you can learn a lot from all these people, and we need to take that into account and use it to our benefit. I also think it's important that everyone in the group feels they are part of the team. I see that as being your responsibility as the team leader (Maria, 58, senior professor).

Within a research community, both members and groups have a voice in the ongoing construction of the community's values, structures, and practices as well as in the development of its identity:

Groups should have a lot of flexibility and it's important to realize that. In a large group you can't expect everyone to have the same interests, so you have to allow room for people to pursue their own interests while still participating in the group's core research. To me that's the important thing, making sure that everyone is able to find their own place within the overall organization and the production of research by the group (Mar, 45, associate professor).

Our respondents stressed the importance of using everybody's skills and knowledge for the way in which the group develops. Such intellectual capital could be used to obtain funding and to deepen the group's knowledge base about ways of developing and structuring the research community (Davis, 2001).

As could be seen through our study, the structure, dimension and internal dynamics of a research group are important aspects that influence group functioning and have an impact on both individual and group research trajectories.

3.2 Internal group factors that influence the success of research activity

Working in a group opens up the possibility of "sharing knowledge" and "establishing wider support networks. When you work in a group, the responsibility for its collective success is transferred to everyone within the group" (Elena, 60, senior professor). This brings us to another important ingredient for professional success: the need for everyone to share a culture of collaboration within the group:

This group has been working together for 15 years, and the shared approach to work is excellent; this is one of the best things about the group. Working as a group adds another dimension. You get to interact with lots of other people, and you get to see things from different perspectives and get ideas you would never even have considered, or at least not in those ways. There always seems to be a sense of progress and extraordinary intellectual pleasure, and that attitude is something we all share, so there's always a great atmosphere, filled with enthusiasm (Elena, 60, senior professor).

These answers highlight the power of networks and groups, an aspect which has been widely discussed by authors such as Davies (2003) and McLaren (2002).

Our participants agreed that working in research groups may well be one of the most important factors in establishing them as successful researchers. Our researchers highlighted two important aspects: firstly, they regarded autonomy as being particularly important at the start of a research career; and secondly, they stressed the potential of group collaboration to assist in obtaining academic progress and recognition.

Autonomy is related to independence in how they work:

At least in my case, the environment at work allows me to have a certain level of freedom of choice. At first I used to work alone. I also work at home, in the mornings" (Olga, 56, associate professor).

In these circumstances, researchers can be thought of as being free and independent, if not sometimes quite isolated (Travaille & Hendriks, 2010) as our researchers recognized.

Striking the right balance between individual effort and the social aspects of being involved in research needs to be taken into account when considering results, as this can sometimes become a key factor in professional success. Furthermore, writing articles, undertaking research projects and engaging in training activities were frequently described by participants in the present study as "collaborative activities" (Grbich, 1998). They actually highlighted the fact that knowledge creation is associated with social factors such as: collaboration with other members of the group; "work meetings, discussions with specialists in the field, deciding leadership strategies"; "attending meetings with group leaders"; and "participation in seminars."

Women researchers also stressed the importance of building horizontal networks between group members. Women researchers stated that they are more able to establish relationships with other specialists in their own field of knowledge, which enhances their productivity and visibility in science:

Establishing horizontal networks with women who are working in the same field as us is really important for us, not just in our own departments, but with people who work in other departments at other universities, in Spain or abroad, who face similar problems and issues (Clara, 38, lecturer).

These responses draw attention to the importance of networking, which long-term studies have shown to be significant in promoting research productivity and improving promotion prospects (e.g. Bryson, 2004; Gardiner, Tiggemann, Kearns, & Marshall; Poole et al., 1997). Along the same lines, some of our participants remarked that, in the highly competitive context of higher education, being able to obtain the funding and resources to undertake research can become a source of pride in itself. Obtaining funding is one of the ways through which research groups get visibility, and when funding is granted it can have "a very positive effect on a group's mood" (Maria, 58, senior professor).

Research networks also help researchers to stay in contact with their colleagues and to better connect to the trends in their research field. Actually this capacity to anticipate trends in research has a critical importance and ensures success in research. One of the participants stated that:

You have to be alert to all kinds of signals. This, in effect, means you have to try to anticipate the direction research is heading towards. Being a pioneer in the field has always proved to be crucial. (Maria, 58, senior professor).

Following the research trends is important but not sufficient in order to obtain the maximum results in research. The group's leaders also highlighted the importance of training within their research groups. According to participants, research groups provide the kind of supportive environment that ensures high standards and, by doing so, they effectively train the next generation of researchers. Our participants reported three main ways in which training was undertaken: visiting speakers, 'in-house' training organized by the research group itself and participating in training offered by external organizations.

One of the things we do is to invite an expert in the field to deliver a talk," "Once a month we get together and do two things: we update each other on how the research is progressing and we engage in some training activities. We also use external training, especially in the area of statistical methodology (Cristina, 43, associate professor).

Training is essential for the development of younger researchers. Senior researchers play an important role in training younger researchers and helping to share knowledge between group members:

Researchers need to be 'generous.' Every single grain of sand adds to the heap, and we are seeking to make advances in science, so it is important that knowledge and expertise get shared, and spread throughout the whole group. I don't want knowledge just for myself. I want everyone to have access to it (Marina, 52, associate professor).

These statements relate to leadership style within the group. Most of the researchers who participated in our study reported that their preferred leadership style is one with a lot of responsibility delegation, and this is the most common approach inside their research groups. Participants think it is part of the research group leaders' role to encourage members to pursue their own individual professional careers, within the group's context. According to participants, another role of research group leaders is to resolve any "small" conflicts of interest that might arise between members. Moreover, all group leaders saw the maintenance of a positive and supportive environment for everyone as being one of their most important roles.

3.3 External group factors influencing success in research

In addition to internal group factors, some external organizational factors were identified as having an impact on the professional success of women researchers. The institutional context is established by departments and by the interaction of the variables found within that environment.

Some of the interviewees considered that their department offered positive support to research groups, encouraging and valuing their work. They also felt that the presence of many other research groups was a positive factor and also helped to promote excellence. In addition, one of the participants highlighted the importance for women to engage in mutual support networks, not only institutionally but also at a broader level. However, one of the participants reported that organizational influence, especially that of the faculty or department to which the group belongs, is of little importance for the development of research and only in a very few cases does it exert either a positive or a negative influence. In another case, one of the interviewees claimed that organizational demands took up a lot of time and her research team could better employ that time working directly on its research.

I don't feel the university has supported my research career, and though that might sound unfair, that's how I see things. I received some very modest financial support but really I couldn't say that the University has supported my work (Laura, 41, lecturer).

When speaking about departmental support, the interviewees discussed this almost exclusively in terms of budgets and the allocation of funding. Most economic resources for research projects came from competitive call-for-research by public bodies at an either national or international level. Heads of departments are in charge of ensuring that the teaching responsibilities of their departments are met by the available staff, and there may be a relation between teaching and research. Although some studies have not found a direct relationship between teaching and productivity (Heinze, Shapira, Rogers, & Senker, 2009; Luukkonen, 2012), other authors argue that the relationship between these factors depends on the academic context (Griffiths, 2004).

Our results indicate that teaching and researching in the same field might have a mutually reinforcing quality: "Ideally, teaching should be closely related to your research. Engaging in research can have a positive effect on teaching and should lead to improvements in teaching, and you can incorporate the results of your research into your teaching" stated one of our participants (Laura, 41, lecturer).

Establishing a balance between research and teaching requires extra effort by everybody within the department and the results obtained in our study actually confirm the mutually supportive relationship between teaching and research. In addition, some of the interviewees pointed out that supervising doctoral and master degree students contributed to the development of their own careers: "Having master degree and doctoral students and supervising their research can prove very helpful" (Laura, 41, lecturer).

The relationship between research and teaching is widely debated in scientific literature; some authors consider them to be mutually supporting activities in the sense that one reinforces the other (e.g. Dever & Morrison, 2009).

Our participants consider that group members with high publication rates commit a lot of time and energy to their research. Rather than trying to do both things, they devote themselves primarily to research activities. The results suggest that the most productive researchers consider teaching to be less important than research and spend fewer hours teaching and preparing courses.

If the teaching activity seems to be relegated to a secondary place by researchers with a high production level, they pay even less attention to the management activity. For most researchers, management is considered to be a very "time-consuming activity" (Carmen, 34, associate professor).

The views expressed by our participants show both teaching and management activities as "disruptive" insofar as they absorb plenty of valuable time which could be better used for research. However, they made a distinction between undergraduate teaching and the supervision of masters' and doctoral theses--which they regarded as being more apt to offer new ideas and research opportunities.

As academics face greater demands on their time, they find it increasingly hard to fulfil all their academic roles: research, teaching and management. That is the reason why our interviewees made several suggestions to their departments about what could be done in order to help them fulfil their research, teaching and administrative duties. The most frequent suggestion concerned the management of teaching: it has been proposed that one term should only be devoted to block teaching, so as to enable academics to spend more overall time on research activities. Other suggestions included receiving more resources and assistance from the department to fulfil administrative tasks. Thus, the onus of finding ways to manage conflicting demands on their time is likely to fall increasingly on the shoulders of the individual academic. Sadler (1999) and Subramaniam (2003) suggest that if academics are going to engage in such important activities as research, they need to be able to decide themselves how they use their time; and that academics need to make it as difficult to be interrupted when they are engaged in research as it is when they are engaged in face-to-face teaching.

This approach is in tune with the prevailing climate within higher education, where the "good researcher" is defined in terms of a narrow band of research outputs. This conception of the "successful researcher" will produce a researcher who tends to invest as little time and effort as possible in (particularly undergraduate) teaching and administrative tasks, who has a competitive approach to grant-getting, developing skills and who needs to invest energy in self-promotion and networking, both locally and internationally.

In the participants' words, the influence of the department on research success is not conclusive, but academic freedom, a good atmosphere and a supportive environment do create a climate of trust that can contribute to a research group's success. One participant explains:

I work in a very supportive environment. The same as in other departments, there have been some pressures, but ours is a small department with a very relaxed working environment and it's very flexible, so I've always felt that I could do what I wanted. I think I'm in a good environment, a very favorable one (Maria Carmen, 56, associate professor).

Several studies (e.g. Long, 1978) have found that providing a scientist with more free time to use for research, good quality physical resources and good social support to support his/her academic work can improve the prestige of a department. However Hagstrom (1967) concluded that, while departmental prestige is associated with a number of factors which might be expected to influence research productivity, there is no evidence for "believing that a greater productivity of scientists in high prestige departments is due more to the context where they work than to their research skills and motivations" (p. 61).

Despite the positive focus of our research, the interviewees felt that being a woman was an obstacle to building a successful academic career. In line with the findings of Guillarmon (2011), some of the women interviewed in this study pointed out that:

Despite the high number of women found at different levels within the university: undergraduates, Ph.D. students and those in the early stages of their careers, there are only four senior women professors in Spain [in anthropology]. In addition, these professors are currently undergoing a very demanding accreditation process in which they have to travel all around Spain to find an examining board; it could be said that this field is not particularly friendly towards women (Maria Carmen, 56, associate professor).

However, the recognition of the barriers that women who head research groups have to deal with at universities is one of the factors that might improve the chance of success for other women academics. If academic women start to recognize the impact of gender disparities within the university environment, they will be able to work together to reduce such disparities and promote successful careers for other women.

4 CONCLUSIONS

Success at university is also associated with organizational factors and depends on the effective functioning of a research group. With regard to research groups, if women research directors achieve a certain level of success, it is seen as a reflection of the whole group's efforts and that success is shared among all its members. At the same time, the success of women research directors is also seen as a motivating factor both personally and at a group level. The characteristics of successful women leaders in research groups include a willingness to share knowledge, to collaborate effectively and to maintain a clear vision and a set of objectives. All these factors are essential for the achievement of success both personally and at a group level for any length of time. Women acting as research directors associated personal success with group success and knowledge sharing. The ability to work in a group, creatively and collaboratively, to interact with others and share responsibility was also mentioned as a determinant of success. Successful research groups can be recognized by the quality of their publications and the results of their research (budgets, training), by their good working environment, by their ability to meet technical and financial conditions and by the reputation and professional recognition of their leaders. Group factors are necessary for success, as they ensure that the individual researchers partake in the overall success of the group.

This article summarizes the group factors that determine the success of women who are research group directors. Despite the institutional, group and personal obstacles, women in such positions promote academic development, better research and the effective communication of results. A willingness to continue working and changing the intellectual environment stand out among the objectives that successful women occupying directorial roles within research value most highly, even though universities in Catalonia are still perceived to be dominated by masculine cultural values.

This study has some limitations too. Findings should be viewed as an initial exploration of the group factors that affect women's career development in higher education. However, further studies are needed in order to explore the relationships and patterns that might explain changes in the professional practices from an organizational point of view.

The results of the present study could improve our knowledge of the factors associated with excellence in research amongst academic women. This could assist in the development of institutional policies and practices at the higher education level and such organizations could adopt approaches which would largely help women to build successful research careers.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Funded by: Women's Institute, Agency for Management of University and Research Grants (AGAUR), Ref. U45-10. Government of Catalonia

REFERENCES

Bagilhole, B. (2007). Challenging women in the male academy: think about draining the swamp. In P. Cotterill, S. Jackson, & G. Letherby (Eds.), Challenges and negotiations for women in higher education. Dordrecht: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4020-6110-3_1

Bruneau, W. A., & Savage, D. C. (2002). Counting out the scholars: How performance indicators undermine universities and colleges. Toronto: James Lorimer.

Bryson, C. (2004). The consequences for women in the academic profession of the widespread use of fixed term contracts. Gender, work and organization, 11(2), 187-206. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-0432.2004.00228.x

Carayol, N., & Matt, M. (2004). Does research organization influence academic production? Laboratory level evidence from a large European university. Research Policy, 33, 1081-1102. doi: 10.1016/j.respol.2004.03.004

Davis, K. (2001). Peripheral and subversive: Women making connections and challenging the boundaries of the science community. Science Education, 55(4), 368-409. doi: 10.1002/sce.1015

Dever, M., & Morrison, Z. (2009). Women, research performance and work context. Tertiary Education and Management, 15(1), 49-62. doi: 10.1080/13583880802700107

Devos, A. (2007). Women, research and the politics of professional development." Studies in Higher Education, 29(5), 591-604. doi: 10.1080/0307507042000261562

Doherty, L., & Manfredi, S. (2005). Improving women's representation in senior positions in the higher education sector, stage findings. Oxford: Centre for Diversity Policy Research, Oxford Brookes University.

Evans, L. (2012). Leadership for Researcher Development: What Research Leaders Need to Know and Understand. Educational Management Administration and Leadership, 40(4), 423-435. doi: 10.1177/1741143212438218

Gardiner, M., Tiggemann, M., Kearns, H., & Marshall, K. (2007). Show me the money! An empirical analysis of mentoring outcomes for women in academia. Higher Education Research and Development, 26, 425-442. doi: 10.1080/07294360701658633

Grbich, C. (1998). The academic researcher: Socialisation in settings previously dominated by teaching. Higher Education, 36, 67-85. doi: 10.1023/A:1003104311001

Griffiths, R. (2004). Knowledge production and the research-teaching nexus in eight advanced-industrialized countries. Higher Education, 34, 397-420.

Guillarmon, C. (2011). Los condicionantes de la carrera investigadora en la Universidad que encuentran las mujeres In M. Tomas (Ed.), La Universidad vista desde una perspectiva de genero. Barcelona: Octaedro.

Hagstrom, W. O. (1967). Competition and teamwork in science. Final report to the national Science Foundation for research grant GS-657. Madison: Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin.

Heinze, T., Shapira, P., Rogers, J. D., & Senker, J. M. (2009). Organizational and institutional influences on creativity in scientific research. Research Policy, 35(4), 610-623. doi: 10.1016/j.respol.2009.01.014

Higgs, J. (2003). Making a difference. In H. Edwards, D. Baume, & G. Webb (Eds.), Staff and educational development: Case studies, experience and practice from higher education. Sterling, VA/London: Kogan.

Hobson, J., Jones, G., & Deane, E. (2005). The research assistant: Silenced partner in Australia's knowledge production? Journal of Higher Education Policy and Mangement, 27, 357-366. doi: 10.1080/13600800500283890

Lafferty, G., & Fleming, J. (2000). The restructuring of academic work in Australia: Power, management and gender. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 21, 257-267. doi: 10.1080/713655344

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, M.A.: Cambridge University Press. doi: 10.1017/CBO9780511815355

Lazega, E.; Mounier, L.; Jourda, M. T., & Stofer, R. (2006). Organizational vs. personal social capital in scientists' performance: A multi-level network study of elite French cancer researchers (19961998). Scientometrics, 67(1), 27-44. doi:10.1007/s11192-006-0049-5

Long, S. (1978). Productivity and academic position in the scientific career. American Sociological Review, 43(6), 889-908. doi: 10.2307/2094628

Luukkonen, T. (2012). Conservatism and risk-taking in peer review: Emerging ERC practices. Research Evaluation, 21(1), 48-60. doi: 10.1093/reseval/rvs001

McLaren, M. (2002). Feminism, Foucault and embodied subjectivity. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Morley, L. (2003). Quality and Power in higher education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Nowotny, H. (1989). Individual autonomy and autonomy of science: the place of the individual in the research system. In S. E. Cozzens et al. (Eds.), The research system in transition Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Poole, M., Bornholt, L., & Summers, F. (1997). An international study of the gendered nature of academic work: some cross cultural explorations. Higher Education, 34, 373-396. doi: 10.1023/A:1003075907126

Rocha, J. R., Marin, Sampere, M. J., & Sebastian, J. (2008). Estructura y dinamica de los grupos de investigacion. Arbor, 732, 743-757.

Sadler, R. (1999). Managing your academic career: strategies for success. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Seglen, P. O., & Aksnes, D. (2000). Scientific Productivity and Group Size: A Bibliometric Analysis of Norwegian Microbiological Research. Scientometrics, 49, 1, 125-143. doi: 10.1023/A:1005665309719

Sagaria, M., & Agans, L. (2006). Gender equality in US higher education: International framing and institutional realities. Higashi, Hiroshima City: Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

Smeby, S., & Try, S. (2005). Departmental contexts and faculty research activity in Norway. Research in Higher Education, 46, 593-619. doi: 10.1007/s11162-004-4136-2

Stephan, P. E., & Levin, S. G. (1997). The critical importance of careers in collaborative scientific research. Revue d'economie industrielle, 79, 45-61. doi: 10.3406/rei.1997.1652

Subramaniam, N. (2003). Factors affecting the career progress of academic accountants in Australia: Cross-institutional and gender perspectives. Higher Education, 46, 507-542. doi: 10.1023/A:1027388311727

Tomas, M., Duran, M. M., Guillarmon, C., & Lavie, J. M. (2008). Profesoras universitarias y cargos de gestion. Contextos educativos, 11, 113-129.

Toren, N. (1993). The temporal dimension of gender inequality in academia. Higher Education, 25, 439-455. doi:10.1007/BF01383846

Travaille, A. E., & Hendriks, P. (2010). What keeps science spiralling? Unravelling the critical success factors of knowledge creation in university research. Higher Education, 59, 423-439. doi: 10.1007/s10734-009-9257-2

Von Tunzelman, N., Ranga, M., Martin, B., & Geuna, A. (2003). The effects of size on research performance: A SPRU review, Brighton: University of Sussex.

Walby, S., & Olsen, W. (2002). The impact of women's position in the labour market on pay and implications for UK productivity. Department for Trade and Industry. Retrieved from http ://www. womenandequalityunit.gov. uk/p ay/res earch. htm#impact

Georgeta Ion *

Department of Applied Pedagogy, Autonomous University of Barcelona {georgeta.ion@uab.cat}

Received on 27 September 2013; revised on 3 October 2013; accepted on 21 November 2013; published on 15 July 2014

DOI: 10.7821/naer.3.2.59-66

* To whom correspondence should be addressed:

Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Edifice G6, 248

08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Valles)

Spain

1 INTRODUCCION

1.1 Factores que influyen en las carreras investigadoras

La investigacion se ha identificado como una de las actividades academicas mas importantes (Hobson, Jones & Deane, 2005), con estudios relevantes que estan realizando los investigadores en el campo de la organizacion educativa. La atencion de los autores se centro en los indicadores de desempeno del personal academico que participan en las actividades de investigacion (por ejemplo, Bruneau & Savage, 2002; Morley, 2003), incluyendo aspectos tales como el numero de publicaciones, los presupuestos para proyectos de investigacion, asi como la difusion de los resultados. Todos estos factores pueden ser importantes en la determinacion de la promocion a niveles profesionales mas altos o la obtencion de prestigio profesional.

Mientras que la literatura muestra que se han logrado algunos avances en el nivel de participacion de las mujeres en la Educacion Superior, todavia hay una diferenciacion clara de los roles dentro de las universidades en funcion del sexo (Sagaria & Agans, 2006, Smeby & Try, 2005). Por ejemplo, se ha sugerido que las mujeres son mas dedicadas a las actividades docentes, mientras que los hombres tienen mas probabilidades de lograr el reconocimiento de sus investigaciones y de sus capacidades de gestion (Bagilhole, 2007; Tomas, Duran, Guillarmon & Lavie, 2008). Ademas, otras cuestiones se plantean, por ejemplo, en relacion con las circunstancias que llevan a las mujeres a tener menores niveles de productividad de la investigacion (Walby & Olsen, 2002) y la identificacion de los obstaculos que enfrentan las mujeres en sus carreras de investigacion.

Entre estos obstaculos se ha demostrado que las mujeres tienen menos confianza en sus propias habilidades y no tienen el mismo grado de acceso a las redes academicas como los hombres (Doherty & Manfredi, 2005). Como consecuencia, las mujeres tienen menos acceso a la financiacion para la investigacion (Lafferty & Fleming, 2000) y tienen menos recursos y menos personal de investigacion (Toren, 1993) a su disposicion.

A pesar de los obstaculos mencionados, hay mujeres que han alcanzado el exito academico y algunas de ellas han logrado un gran reconocimiento profesional. Resulta esclarecedor, en este sentido, identificar los factores que son fundamentales para que las docentes tengan exito. Mientras que los obstaculos en el desarrollo de una carrera academica exitosa han sido ampliamente investigados, se han llevado a cabo pocas investigaciones sobre los factores asociados con el exito de las mujeres en puestos de liderazgo de la investigacion.

Sin embargo, se han publicado algunos estudios pertinentes tanto al nivel internacional como dentro de Espana y Cataluna. Algunas de las aportaciones importantes identificadas incluyen el estudio del concepto de desarrollo como investigador, con especial atencion a las mujeres lideres (Evans, 2012), el impacto de los programas de formacion y su papel en la promocion del desarrollo profesional, la importancia de la adquisicion de habilidades de investigacion (Devos, 2007, entre otros), y los programas de tutoria (Higgs, 2003; Guillarmon, 2011). Otros aspectos relacionados con la construccion de una carrera exitosa son la cultura organizacional y el contexto social (Dever & Morrison, 2009).

Cuando se investigan los factores que influyen en la actividad de investigacion, la literatura cientifica se centra especialmente en el nivel individual. La mayoria de los estudios investigan los efectos que tienen los determinantes individuales del exito academico sobre la investigacion (por ejemplo, Stephan & Levin, 1997). Los estudios sobre como se produce la investigacion academica, por tanto, reconocen los factores organizativos y de grupo, centrandose en el contexto en el que operan los equipos de investigacion (Stephan & Levin, 1997) e investigan la forma y la calidad de las contribuciones que tienen los companeros de investigacion perteneciente al equipo o grupo sobre el exito y la productividad de los individuos (Carayol & Matt, 2004).

1.2 Los factores organizativos y sus influencias sobre las carreras investigadoras

Mientras que un cuerpo grande y creciente de literatura que investiga los factores que influyen en la productividad a nivel individual ha comenzado a aparecer, solo unos pocos estudios analizan los grupos de investigacion como factores que afectan el exito de la investigacion.

El grupo de investigacion representa la unidad "micro" mas caracteristica de una organizacion y una entidad muy plastica con contornos difusos, en algunos casos. Los grupos de investigacion son unidades organizativas funcionales, directamente relacionados con la investigacion cientifica. No existe un consenso sobre la definicion de los grupos de investigacion, ni sobre su diferenciacion de otros grupos de investigadores de diferentes unidades organizativas. Algunos autores asimilan al grupo a una unidad funcional, organizativa (Carayol & Matt, 2004; Lazega, et al., 2006). Los grupos tienen la capacidad de auto-organizacion y auto-regulacion (Rocha, Martin y Sebastian, 2008) y su dinamica esta sujeta a una variedad de influencias.

Estudios de Nowotny (1989) muestran la existencia de multiples relaciones y dependencias de los investigadores en los sistemas cientifico-tecnicos, especialmente en relacion con la dinamica de sus colegas y la evolucion de las diferentes disciplinas y areas de investigacion.

Los grupos presentan claras ventajas para el desarrollo de la investigacion, especialmente teniendo en cuenta la importancia de la complementariedad y la masa critica para ciertas funciones. El rendimiento de los grupos de investigacion se ve influenciada, tanto cuantitativa como cualitativamente, no solo por las caracteristicas individuales de los investigadores, sino tambien por factores colectivos y contextuales. El contexto organizativo es el en que los grupos e investigadores que trabajan influye significativamente en los patrones de trabajo, las culturas y la dinamica de la investigacion. Los factores contextuales generales tales como la disciplina o el campo de la ciencia, el contexto organizacional, el prestigio de la institucion, el grado de autonomia y flexibilidad, el apoyo financiero a la investigacion, los procedimientos y criterios de evaluacion--son todos factores que determinan en ultima instancia la productividad.

A la luz de las investigaciones antes mencionadas, nuestro estudio fue disenado para investigar los factores especificos de la organizacion, las estrategias y las culturas de trabajo asociadas al exito academico de las mujeres en el contexto catalan.

2 METODOLOGIA

2.1 El contexto de la investigacion

En el contexto actual de la universidad, donde el rendimiento academico y los rankings son los indicadores clave, el mundo academico esta en la busqueda de formas de mejorar la capacidad de investigacion y la productividad. Las universidades de Cataluna se encuentran en este paradigma y su perspectiva ha cambiado recientemente hacia un mayor enfasis en la publicacion de los resultados de investigacion. Ademas, hay una presion no solo para publicar, sino tambien para asegurar el financiamiento externo e interno de la investigacion. En este contexto, el gobierno catalan a traves de su Agencia de Calidad de la Universidad (AQU), ha desarrollado un modelo de evaluacion basado en el rendimiento general del grupo de investigacion, con especial atencion a los meritos de la lider del grupo. Estos grupos se denominan los Grupos de Investigacion Consolidados (GRC): cada grupo recibe financiacion publica de acuerdo a la calidad de su trabajo de acuerdo con la revision anual de desempeno academico.

Los criterios utilizados por la agencia ofrecen especial importancia a la cantidad de publicaciones realizadas por los miembros del grupo y el prestigio academico de las revistas en las que aparecen. El lider del grupo es una figura clave y su rendimiento es un factor determinante en la obtencion de una calificacion excelente. Por lo tanto, un investigador de exito puede ser definido sobre la base de su liderazgo del GRC y el numero de solicitudes seleccionadas para la financiacion de la investigacion (desde el interior de su universidad, desde el gobierno catalan o de fuentes externas). El 65% de los GRC en Cataluna estan dirigidas por hombres, mientras que 35% cinco son dirigidas por mujeres.

En este contexto, nuestro estudio se centra en analizar los factores grupales que tengan un impacto positivo en el exito de las mujeres lideres de GRC en su campo academico.

La metodologia consta de entrevistas con las participantes, que son todas academicas, activamente implicadas en la investigacion y que han logrado un grado de reconocimiento publico en sus respectivos campos. La guia de entrevista fue validada mediante pruebas piloto y a traves de expertos.

En el analisis de las entrevistas se utilizo un enfoque cualitativo, ya que se explora las percepciones de las participantes sobre sus carreras investigadoras.

2.2 Participantes

Los participantes en el estudio fueron 14 mujeres que ocupan posiciones de liderazgo en los GRC en las ciencias sociales, y que trabajan en las universidades publicas catalanas. Las edades de las mujeres oscila entre 30 y 60 anos de edad y su condicion profesional varia de profesor lector a profesor asociado y catedratico.

Los grupos que lideran estan formados tanto por mujeres como hombres, todos ellos academicos. Los grupos contienen entre 7 y 20 personas y estaban compuestos por academicos de la misma area de conocimiento. En el sistema academico espanol, los academicos cumplen tres funciones simultaneamente: docencia, investigacion y gestion.

La validez interna de la investigacion se asegura mediante la seleccion de los informantes con los criterios siguientes: antiguedad en puestos de direccion, tipo de grupos de investigacion (de tamano diferente y areas diferentes dentro de las ciencias sociales) y diferente tipologia de sus lideres. Esto aseguro que los entrevistados se ajustaran a una amplia variedad de perfiles.

2.3 Informacion recogida

Cada participante fue entrevistado una vez y cada entrevista duro aproximadamente 45 minutos. Las entrevistas se realizaron en catalan y en espanol en los lugares de trabajo de los entrevistados y fueron grabadas en audio y transcritas.

Las entrevistas fueron semiestructuradas, con un conjunto de directrices flexibles adaptadas a las caracteristicas particulares de las diferentes disciplinas de los participantes.

La guia de entrevistas abordo los siguientes temas:

--Los antecedentes y el contexto que proporcionan el marco profesional del jefe del equipo de investigacion.

--El papel de la investigacion y su impacto sobre las otras funciones profesionales (su integracion con la docencia y la gestion).

--La percepcion del investigador de los factores que contribuyen a su exito (individual, grupal y factores institucionales).

--La cultura y la dinamica del entorno de trabajo (nivel de colaboracion con los miembros del grupo de investigacion, el clima del grupo, el apoyo mutuo, el desarrollo profesional, etc.).

--La funcion de la formacion del grupo (el papel formativo del grupo de investigacion, desarrollo de carrera de los jovenes investigadores, etc.).

2.4 Analisis de la informacion

El analisis cualitativo de la informacion se realizo utilizando el software MAXQDA 2007. El analisis inicial de los datos permitio la identificacion de las areas clave en base a los temas de investigacion, los cuales fueron sometidos a un analisis adicional con el fin de determinar los componentes de cada tema y la importancia y significado unidos a cada uno de los componentes.

La informacion fue analizada en las siguientes categorias:

--La construccion del grupo de investigacion.

--El papel de la investigacion en la vida academica.

--El nexo entre investigacion y la docencia.

--El nexo entre la gestion y la investigacion.

--La cultura de grupo.

--Dinamica de trabajo dentro del grupo.

--El papel del lider del grupo en el desarrollo profesional de los jovenes investigadores.

--El estilo de liderazgo.

--El papel formativo del grupo.

Gran parte de la informacion proporcionada por los participantes aparece en el analisis en forma de cita directa. Con el fin de garantizar la confidencialidad de los participantes, los seudonimos se han utilizado a lo largo de todo el proceso de presentacion de los resultados.

3 RESULTADOS Y DISCUSION

Las entrevistas revelaron un conjunto de factores asociados con las carreras exitosas de las mujeres investigadoras: formacion para la investigacion, el interes y la motivacion, las decisiones que han tomado a lo largo de sus carreras, las diferentes etapas de su carrera academica, el tiempo pasado en el extranjero y el papel de "mentores" para ayudar al desarrollo de su perfil academico. Ademas de estos, los factores de grupo tuvieron un impacto en la calidad de las relaciones interpersonales dentro de un grupo de investigacion--por ejemplo, la cultura de trabajo, las redes y el grado de apoyo institucional recibido de responsables academicos.

Algunas de las areas mas importantes de esta investigacion examinaron la manera en la cual las investigadoras definen sus primeros pasos en la carrera investigadora, como se las arreglaron en los principales hitos de su carrera, como desarrollaron su condicion de investigadores bien establecidos, asi como su capacidad para garantizar que el trabajo de los programas de investigacion en curso fuera continuada por los nuevos investigadores.

Rocha, Martin y Sebastian (2008) identificaron la relacion clave entre el individuo y los factores grupales: "la productividad individual y colectiva esta influenciada principalmente por el contexto de la organizacion, que proporciona la plantilla para cosas tales como formas de trabajo, cultura de la investigacion y de la direccion del trabajo, que a su vez da forma a la labor tanto del grupo y el investigador individual".

En nuestro estudio nos centramos en los factores de grupo que pueden influir en el desarrollo profesional de las mujeres investigadoras. Hemos organizado los resultados de acuerdo a los temas centrales de la investigacion. Los detalles acerca de la edad y la posicion academica de los contribuyentes tambien se incluyen con el fin de proporcionar informacion contextual que permite una comprension mas exacta de sus declaraciones.

3.1 Como se forman los grupos de investigacion y como funcionan

En primer lugar, el analisis de la opinion de los participantes se centro en el proceso de desarrollo del grupo y de su dinamica interna. En esta linea, podriamos identificar varias etapas de la carrera investigadora. Nuestros participantes indican que, inicialmente, prefieren trabajar solas en la fase inicial de su carrera y solo fue a medida que avanzaban en sus carreras que comenzaron a unirse a otros investigadores. Los participantes caracterizan a este momento como un periodo de reflexion y construccion de sus propias ideas, de la consolidacion de las lineas de investigacion y en la correlacion con el interes de otros investigadores.

En segundo lugar, los participantes explican cuales son las estrategias utilizadas para la construccion de los grupos de investigacion. En este sentido, hay dos tipos de grupos: aquellos que se forman en torno a un investigador senior y los formados por la union de un grupo de investigadores.

El ciclo de la evolucion de los grupos incluye procesos como la construccion y la eliminacion de la segregacion, la inclusion de nuevos miembros o la disolucion de acuerdo con los intereses o las trayectorias personales de sus miembros. De esta manera, los grupos son diferentes en tamano durante su existencia. Nuestras participantes senalaron que cuando un grupo aumenta de tamano, hay una tendencia de dividirse en grupos mas pequenos, cada uno centrado en un tema de investigacion especifico diferente. Entre los factores identificados por las participantes como la conduccion de este proceso de segmentacion y de disolucion se encuentran: el desarrollo academico de los investigadores que buscan una mayor independencia y desean ejercer su propio liderazgo, la aparicion de incompatibilidades y conflictos que inevitablemente surgen en las actividades colectivas, el desarrollo de nuevas lineas de investigacion entre los investigadores y la aparicion de nuevas oportunidades para el desarrollo profesional. El tamano optimo de los grupos y los beneficios potenciales de la concentracion de recursos son aspectos especialmente controvertidos. El tema ha sido analizado por varios autores. Seglen y Aksnes (2000) estudiaron el tamano del grupo y las relaciones que tienen con la productividad de la investigacion. Von Tunzelman et al. (2003), en una revision de los efectos del tamano en el rendimiento de la investigacion, concluyen que los estudios sobre la relacion entre el tamano y la productividad proporcionan poca evidencia convincente de la vinculacion de estos factores y promueven politicas para fomentar la interaccion entre la investigacion dentro de pequenas unidades para contrarrestar el problema de la "soledad".

Las relaciones internas y la integracion social del grupo estan relacionados con factores tales como la estabilidad del grupo, la cohesion y la sinergia. La integracion social de los investigadores se ha estudiado principalmente en el nivel "macro" y "meso" de las organizaciones de investigacion, y mucho menos en los grupos de investigacion. Nowotny (1989) muestra la existencia de multiples relaciones y dependencias de los investigadores en los sistemas cientifico-tecnicos, especialmente en relacion con la dinamica de sus colegas y la evolucion de las diferentes disciplinas y areas de investigacion.

Las fuerzas que mantienen la cohesion de los grupos de investigacion estan relacionadas con el grado de satisfaccion de sus componentes en terminos de motivaciones, expectativas profesionales y los objetivos cientificos. La cohesion tambien esta relacionada con el intercambio de una cultura de grupo donde los flujos de liderazgo, intereses, habitos de trabajo, la comunicacion y la informacion, y los niveles de competitividad son satisfactorios para todos los componentes del grupo. En esta linea, algunas de las participantes informaron de que era muy importante para asegurar la progresion y el desarrollo personal de los investigadores y que sentian que este estaba relacionado con el reconocimiento de la diversidad de los individuos dentro del grupo. En palabras de los participantes, el exito profesional esta relacionado con la progresion y el tiempo, y depende de la personalidad propia de cada miembro del grupo de investigacion:

Se necesita ser flexible, cada persona tiene un ritmo diferente. Creo que tenemos que reconocer que la contribucion de una persona a un grupo de trabajo puede ser muy diferente de la de otra persona. Algunas personas trabajan a un ritmo muy rapido, mientras que otros pueden avanzar a un ritmo mas lento y no publicar mucho, a pesar de que tienen una gran cantidad de conocimientos para aprovechar (Maria, 56 anos, profesora titular, puso de relieve una de las participantes).

El grupo ofrece ayuda mutua y apoyo moral a sus miembros. El compromiso con la investigacion y con los demas miembros del grupo son los factores clave para lograr resultados exitosos de investigacion, de acuerdo con las participantes:

El trabajo en equipo es la clave del exito. Se necesita saber como garantizar que un equipo tenga un buen ambiente, la cooperacion eficaz es esencial. Asi que ahora tenemos un nucleo de investigadores que han adquirido la experiencia suficiente para llevar a cabo sus propios proyectos de investigacion (Carmen, de 34 anos, profesora titular).

La estructura horizontal del grupo y las relaciones entre sus miembros representan un foro donde los miembros puedan reunirse y discutir sus preocupaciones en relacion con la investigacion y la vida academica en general. Como uno de los participantes lo comenta:

Bueno, creo que trabajando juntos, colaborando en lugar de competir entre si, es muy importante--que la gente esta trabajando hacia un objetivo comun. Siempre he alentado a los miembros a mostrar mucha iniciativa (Joana, 45 anos, profesora titular).

Estas respuestas ilustran como los grupos sirven como espacios donde los miembros pueden construir su confianza, adquirir una mayor responsabilidad y proporcionar un sentido de comunidad que realza la participacion de todos en el grupo. Lave y Wenger (1991) sostienen que los individuos adquieren el respeto, la experiencia y una identidad valorados por la comunidad a traves de la inmersion en su entorno y participar en sus practicas. Es a traves de la integracion en la comunidad cientifica que los investigadores inexpertos se familiaricen con los valores, las practicas y los conocimientos del grupo.

En consonancia con las conclusiones de Davis (2001) con respecto a la comunidad academica, los miembros adquieren respeto y estatus; en efecto, capital intelectual, como resultado de trabajar en un equipo de investigacion bajo la direccion de un investigador experimentado. Este sentido de comunidad fue identificado por los participantes como muy significativo, ya que consideraban que el grupo de investigacion da lugar a que todos los miembros del grupo puedan hacer una contribucion:

Creo que tenemos que reconocer que la contribucion de una persona a un grupo de trabajo puede ser muy diferente de la de otra persona, pero se puede aprender mucho de esta gente y tenemos que tomar eso en cuenta y utilizarlo para nuestro beneficio. Tambien creo que es importante que todos en el grupo sienten que son parte del equipo. Veo esto como una responsabilidad como lider del equipo (Maria, 58 anos, profesora titular).

Dentro de una comunidad de investigacion, tanto los miembros como los grupos tienen una voz en la construccion de los valores, las estructuras de la comunidad y las practicas, y en el desarrollo de su identidad:

Los grupos deben tener una gran flexibilidad y es importante darse cuenta de eso. En un grupo grande no se puede esperar que todos tengan los mismos intereses, asi que hay que dejar espacio para que las personas persigan sus propios intereses mientras participan en la investigacion basica del grupo. Para mi eso es lo importante, asegurandose de que todo el mundo es capaz de encontrar su propio lugar dentro de la organizacion general y la produccion de la investigacion por el grupo (Mar, 45 anos, profesora titular).

Las entrevistadas hicieron hincapie en la importancia de utilizar las habilidades y conocimientos de todo el mundo en la forma en que el grupo se desarrolla. Ese capital intelectual podria utilizarse para obtener fondos, y profundizar en la base de conocimientos del grupo sobre la forma de desarrollar y estructurar la comunidad de investigadores (Davis, 2001).

Como pudimos ver, la estructura, las dimensiones y la dinamica interna del grupo de investigacion son aspectos importantes que influyen en el funcionamiento del grupo y que tienen impacto en las trayectorias de investigacion individuales y grupales.

3.2 Los factores internos que influyen en las carreras investigadoras de exito

Trabajar en un grupo abre la posibilidad del "intercambio de conocimientos" y "el establecimiento de redes de apoyo mas amplias. Cuando se trabaja en grupo, la responsabilidad del exito colectivo del grupo se traslada a todo el mundo dentro del grupo" (Elena, 60 anos, catedratica). Esto nos lleva a otro ingrediente importante para el exito profesional: la necesidad de que todos compartan una cultura de colaboracion dentro del grupo:

Este grupo ha estado trabajando juntos durante 15 anos, y el enfoque comun de trabajo es excelente. Esta es una de las mejores cosas sobre el grupo de trabajo como grupo anade otra dimension. Tienes la oportunidad de interactuar con muchas otras persona y se llega a ver las cosas desde diferentes perspectivas y obtener ideas que nunca se les han considerado, o al menos no de esa forma (Elena, 60 anos, catedratica).

Estas respuestas ponen de relieve el poder de las redes y grupos, un aspecto que ha sido ampliamente discutido por los autores como Davies (2003) y McLaren (2002).

Los participantes estuvieron de acuerdo en que trabajar en grupos de investigacion puede ser uno de los factores mas importantes para alcanzar el exito. Nuestros investigadores destacaron dos aspectos importantes: en primer lugar, consideran la autonomia como particularmente importante en el inicio de una carrera de investigacion, y en segundo lugar, destacaron el potencial de colaboracion en grupo para ayudar a obtener progreso academico y reconocimiento.

La autonomia se refiere a la independencia en el funcionamiento:

Por lo menos en mi caso, el ambiente en el trabajo me permite tener cierto nivel de libertad de eleccion. Al principio yo solia trabajar sola tambien trabajo en la casa, por las mananas (Olga, 56 anos, profesora catedratica).

En estas circunstancias, las investigadoras pueden considerarse como libres e independientes, aunque a veces bastante aisladas (Travaille & Hendriks, 2010).

Hay que tener en cuenta, al considerar los resultados, que es necesario encontrar el justo equilibrio entre el esfuerzo individual y los aspectos sociales de la participacion en la investigacion, ya que a veces puede ser un factor clave en el exito profesional. Por otra parte, en la redaccion de articulos, la realizacion de proyectos de investigacion y la participacion en actividades de formacion fueron descritos con frecuencia por los participantes en el estudio como "actividades de tipo colaborativo" (Grbich, 1998). Las participantes pusieron de relieve el hecho de que la creacion de conocimiento se asocia con factores sociales tales como: colaboracion con otros miembros del grupo; "reuniones de trabajo, discusiones con especialistas en la materia, para decidir las estrategias de liderazgo", "ir a las reuniones con los lideres de grupo" y la "participacion en los seminarios".

Las investigadoras tambien hicieron hincapie en la importancia de la construccion de redes horizontales entre los miembros de los grupos. Senalaron que son mas capaces que los hombres de establecer relaciones con otros especialistas en su propio campo de conocimiento, que mejoran su productividad y la visibilidad de la ciencia:

El establecimiento de redes horizontales con las mujeres que trabajan en el mismo campo que nosotros es realmente importante para nosotros, no solo en nuestras propias areas de conocimiento, pero con personas que trabajan en otros departamentos de otras universidades, en Espana o en otros paises, que se enfrentan a similares problemas y cuestiones (Clara, 38 anos, lectora).

Estas respuestas ponen de relieve la importancia del trabajo en red, que tambien se ha considerado en otros estudios y que han demostrado que este es importante en la promocion de la productividad de la investigacion y en la mejora de las perspectivas de promocion (por ejemplo, Bryson, 2004; Gardiner et al., 2007; Poole et al., 1997). En la misma linea, algunas de las participantes comentaron que, en un contexto altamente competitivo como es la Educacion Superior, el ser capaz de obtener el financiamiento y los recursos para llevar a cabo la investigacion puede llegar a ser en si mismo un motivo de orgullo. La obtencion de financiacion es una de las formas en que los grupos de investigacion tienen mayor visibilidad y cuando se concede la financiacion, puede tener "un efecto muy positivo en el estado de animo de un grupo" (Maria, 58 anos, catedratica).

Las redes de investigacion tambien ayudan a los investigadores a estar en contacto con sus colegas y para conectar mejor con las tendencias en su campo de investigacion. En realidad esta capacidad de anticipar tendencias en la investigacion tiene una importancia mayor y asegura el exito en la investigacion. Una de las participantes senalo que:

Hay que estar atentos a todo tipo de senales. Esto, en efecto, significa que tienes que tratar de anticipar la direccion de la investigacion. Ser un pionero en el campo, es crucial (Maria, 58 anos, catedratica).

Siguiendo las lineas prioritarias de investigacion es importante, pero no suficiente, para obtener los maximos resultados en la investigacion. Las lideres de los grupos tambien destacaron la importancia de la formacion dentro de sus grupos de investigacion. Segun las participantes, los grupos de investigacion proporcionan la clase de ambiente de apoyo que garantiza un alto nivel y al hacerlo se forma de manera efectiva la proxima generacion de investigadores. Nuestras participantes informaron de tres formas principales en que se llevo a cabo la formacion: visitar centros de prestigio en la investigacion, formacion 'inhouse', organizada por la misma institucion y participando en los cursos ofrecidos por organizaciones externas y por grupos de investigacion.

Una de las cosas que hacemos es invitar a un experto en el campo para dar una conferencia". "Una vez al mes nos reunimos y hacemos dos cosas: nos actualizamos sobre como la investigacion esta avanzando y nos involucramos en algunas actividades de formacion. Tambien utilizamos la formacion externa, especialmente en el area de la metodologia estadistica (Cristina, de 43 anos, profesora titular).

La formacion es esencial para el desarrollo de los investigadores mas jovenes. Los investigadores expertos tienen un papel importante en la formacion de los investigadores mas jovenes y en ayudar a compartir el conocimiento entre los miembros del grupo:

Los investigadores deben ser generosos. Cada grano de arena se suma al monton, y estamos mirando para hacer avances en la ciencia, por lo que es importante que el conocimiento y la experiencia se compartan, y se extiendan a lo largo de todo el grupo. No quiero que el conocimiento sea solo para mi. Quiero que todos tengan acceso a ello (Marina, 52 anos, profesora titular).

Estas respuestas se relacionan con el estilo de liderazgo dentro del grupo. La mayoria de los investigadores que participaron en el estudio informaron de que su estilo preferido de liderazgo es uno donde hay una importante delegacion la responsabilidad, y este es el metodo mas comun en sus grupos de investigacion. Las participantes creen que es parte de la funcion de los lideres de los grupos de investigacion alentar a los miembros a seguir sus propias carreras profesionales individuales, en el contexto del grupo. Segun los participantes, otro papel de los lideres del grupo de investigacion es resolver cualquier "pequeno" conflicto de interes que pueda surgir entre los miembros. Ademas, todos los lideres de los grupos vieron el mantenimiento de un ambiente positivo y de apoyo para todo el mundo como uno de sus papeles mas importantes.

3.3 Factores externos que influyen las carreras de exito

Ademas de los factores intemos al grupo, hay una serie de factores organizacionales externos que fueron identificados y que tienen un impacto en el exito profesional de las investigadoras. El contexto institucional establecido por los departamentos influye en la mayoria de los casos.

Algunas de las mujeres entrevistadas consideraron que su departamento ofrecio un apoyo positivo a los grupos de investigacion, el fomento y la valoracion de su trabajo. Tambien consideraron que la presencia de otros grupos de investigacion en el mismo ambito de conocimiento fue un factor positivo que ayudo a promover la excelencia. Ademas, una de las participantes destaco la importancia de que las mujeres participen en redes de apoyo mutuo, no solo a nivel institucional, pero a un nivel mas amplio. Sin embargo, una de las participantes informo de que la influencia de la organizacion, en especial de la facultad o departamento al que pertenece el grupo, es de poca importancia en el desarrollo de la investigacion y solo en muy pocos casos no se ejerce una influencia positiva o una negativa. En otro ejemplo, una de las mujeres entrevistadas considero que las demandas de gestion de la organizacion implica una amplia dedicacion horaria, dedicacion que se podria reorientar y emplear mejor directamente en su investigacion.

No siento que la universidad ha apoyado mi carrera de investigacion, y aunque eso puede sonar injusto, asi es como yo veo las cosas. He recibido un apoyo financiero muy modesto, pero realmente no podia decir que la Universidad ha apoyado mi trabajo (Laura, 41 anos, lectora).

Cuando se habla de apoyo departamental, las mujeres entrevistadas discutieron casi exclusivamente en terminos de presupuestos y la asignacion de fondos. La mayoria de los recursos economicos para proyectos de investigacion provienen de convocatorias competitivas de investigacion de los organismos publicos a nivel nacional o internacional. Los jefes de departamento son los encargados de velar por que las responsabilidades docentes del departamento se cubran por el personal disponible, y en esta linea puede asegurar que haya una relacion entre la ensenanza y la investigacion. Aunque algunos estudios no han encontrado una relacion directa entre la ensenanza y la productividad (Heinze, Shapira, Rogers & Senker, 2009; Luukkonen, 2012), otros autores sostienen que la relacion entre estos factores depende del contexto academico (Griffiths, 2004).

Nuestros resultados indican que la docencia y la investigacion en el mismo campo pueden que se refuerzan mutuamente: "Lo ideal es que la docencia debe estar estrechamente relacionada con su investigacion. Participar en la investigacion puede tener un efecto positivo en la ensenanza y deberia conducir a mejoras en las clases, y se puedan incorporar los resultados de su investigacion en su docencia" declaro una de nuestros participantes (Laura, de 41 anos, lectora).

Establecer un equilibrio entre la investigacion y la docencia requiere un esfuerzo adicional para todo el mundo dentro del departamento y los resultados obtenidos en este estudio confirman la relacion de apoyo mutuo entre estas dos facetas de la carrera academica. Ademas, algunas de las mujeres entrevistadas senalaron que la tutorizacion de estudiantes de doctorado y de master han contribuido al desarrollo de su propia carrera: "Tener maestria y doctorado y supervisar su investigacion puede ser muy util" (Laura, de 41 anos, lectora).

La relacion entre la investigacion y la docencia es ampliamente debatida en la literatura cientifica. Algunos autores consideran que estas funciones se apoyan mutuamente (por ejemplo, Dever & Morrison, 2009).

Nuestras participantes consideran que los miembros del grupo con altas tasas de publicacion dedican una cantidad importante de tiempo y energia para su investigacion. Los resultados sugieren que los investigadores mas productivos consideran que la docencia es menos importante que la investigacion y pasan menos horas en la preparacion de las clases.

Si la actividad docente ocupa un lugar secundario por los investigadores con alto nivel de produccion, la actividad de gestion es aun menos considerada. Para la mayor parte de las investigadoras, la gestion es considerada como una "actividad que consume mucho tiempo" (Carmen, 34 anos, profesora titular).

Las opiniones expresadas por las participantes consideran la docencia y las actividades de gestion como "un elemento perturbador" en cuanto a que absorben un tiempo valioso que podria ser mejor utilizado para la investigacion. Sin embargo, existe un matiz en cuanto a la docencia de pregrado y la de postgrado, esta ultima es considerada como una oportunidad de investigacion. Para hacer frente a estos requisitos, las participantes consideran que una posible medida seria concentrar la docencia en solo un trimestre a fin de permitir que los academicos pasen mas tiempo, en general, en las actividades de investigacion. Otras sugerencias incluyen la asistencia para cumplir con las tareas administrativas. Sadler (1999) y Subramaniam (2003) sugieren que si los academicos van a participar en actividades tan importantes como la investigacion, tienen que ser capaces de decidir por si mismos como utilizan su tiempo.

Este enfoque concuerda con el clima que prevalece en la Educacion Superior, en el que el "buen investigador" se define en terminos de los resultados de investigacion. Esta concepcion del investigador hace que los academicos tiendan a invertir el minimo de tiempo y esfuerzo posible en tareas docentes (sobre todo de pregrado) y administrativas, que tengan un enfoque competitivo para conseguir el desarrollo de habilidades y que necesita invertir mucha energia en su auto-promocion y creacion de redes, tanto a nivel local como internacional.

En palabras de los participantes, la influencia del departamento en el exito de la investigacion no es concluyente, pero la libertad de catedra, un buen ambiente y un entorno propicio a crear un clima de confianza pueden contribuir al exito de un grupo de investigacion. Como dice una participante:

Yo trabajo en un ambiente que es muy solidario. Al igual que en otros departamentos, se han producido algunas presiones, pero el nuestro es un pequeno departamento de un ambiente de trabajo muy relajado y es muy flexible, por lo que siempre me he sentido bien y donde yo podia hacer lo que queria. Creo que estoy en un buen ambiente, una muy favorable (Maria Carmen, 56 anos, profesora catedratica).

Diversos estudios (por ejemplo, Long, 1978) han encontrado que una mejor gestion del tiempo para ser utilizado para la investigacion, los recursos fisicos de buena calidad y un buen apoyo social para mantener su trabajo academico puede mejorar el prestigio del departamento. Sin embargo, Hagstrom (1967) concluyo que, aunque el prestigio del departamento se asocia con una serie de factores que podrian ejercer influencia en la productividad de la investigacion, no hay evidencia de "la creencia de que la mayor productividad de los cientificos en los departamentos de alto prestigio se debe mas al contexto en el que trabajan, que a sus habilidades de investigacion o motivaciones" (p.61).

A pesar del enfoque positivo de nuestra investigacion, los participantes consideraron que el ser mujer es un obstaculo para la construccion de una carrera academica exitosa. En linea con las conclusiones de Guillarmon (2011), algunas de las mujeres entrevistadas en este estudio senalaron que:

A pesar del alto numero de mujeres que se encuentran en diferentes niveles dentro de la universidad: estudiantes de pregrado, los estudiantes de doctorado y las personas en las primeras etapas de sus carreras, solo hay cuatro mujeres profesores catedraticas en Espana [en antropologia]. Ademas, estos profesores se encuentran actualmente en un proceso de acreditacion muy exigente en el que tienen que viajar por toda Espana para encontrar un tribunal, sino que podria decirse que este campo no es especialmente amable hacia las mujeres (Maria Carmen, 56 anos, profesora catedratica).

Sin embargo, el reconocimiento de las barreras que las mujeres que son directoras de los grupos de investigacion tienen que tratar en las universidades, es uno de los factores que podrian mejorar las posibilidades de exito para otras mujeres academicas. Si las mujeres academicas comienzan a reconocer el impacto de las desigualdades de genero en el ambito universitario, pueden trabajar juntas para reducir esas disparidades y promover una carrera exitosa para otras mujeres.

4 CONCLUSIONES

El exito en la universidad se asocia a factores de organizacion y depende del funcionamiento efectivo del grupo de investigacion. Al mismo tiempo, el exito de las directoras la investigacion tambien es visto como un factor de motivacion, tanto a nivel personal como grupal. Las caracteristicas de las mujeres lideres de exito, incluyen la voluntad de compartir el conocimiento, colaborar eficazmente y mantener una vision clara y de conjunto de los objetivos. Todos estos factores son esenciales para el logro del exito, tanto a nivel personal y grupal. Las mujeres que actuan como directoras de investigacion asocian el exito personal con el exito del grupo y el intercambio de conocimiento. La capacidad de trabajar en grupo, de forma creativa y colaborativa, de interactuar con los demas y de compartir la responsabilidad tambien fueron mencionados como factores determinantes del exito. Los grupos de investigacion exitosos pueden ser reconocidos por la calidad de sus publicaciones y los resultados de sus investigaciones presupuestos, formacion, por su buen ambiente de trabajo, por su capacidad para cumplir con las condiciones tecnicas y financieras y por la reputacion y el reconocimiento profesional de sus dirigentes. Los factores de grupo son necesarios para el exito, ya que aseguran que los investigadores individuales contribuyan en el exito global del grupo.

Este articulo resume los factores grupales que determinan el exito de las mujeres que son directoras de grupos de investigacion. A pesar de los obstaculos institucionales, grupales o personales, las mujeres han conseguido promover el desarrollo academico, mejorar la investigacion y la comunicacion efectiva de los resultados. La voluntad de seguir trabajando y cambiando el ambiente intelectual se encuentran entre los objetivos de las mujeres exitosas que ocupan los roles como director a pesar de que las universidades de Cataluna todavia se perciben como ser dominadas por los valores culturales masculinos.

Este estudio tiene algunas limitaciones. Los resultados deben ser vistos como una exploracion inicial de los factores de grupo que afectan el desarrollo de la carrera las mujeres en la Educacion Superior. Sin embargo, con el fin de explorar las relaciones y patrones que pueden explicar los cambios en las practicas profesionales desde una perspectiva organizacional, claramente, se necesitan mas estudios.

Los resultados de este estudio podrian mejorar nuestro conocimiento de los factores asociados a la excelencia en la investigacion entre las mujeres academicas. Esto podria ayudar en el desarrollo de politicas y practicas institucionales en el ambito de la Educacion Superior y tales organizaciones podrian adoptar enfoques que ayuden a las mujeres a construir carreras exitosas de investigacion.

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Financiado por: Institut de les Dones, Agencia de Gestio d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca de Catalunya (AGAUR), Ref. U45-10. Generalitat de Catalunya

REFERENCIAS

Bagilhole, B. (2007). Challenging women in the male academy: think about draining the swamp. In P. Cotterill, S. Jackson, & G. Letherby (Eds.), Challenges and negotiations for women in higher education. Dordrecht: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4020-6110-3_1

Bruneau, W. A., & Savage, D. C. (2002). Counting out the scholars: How performance indicators undermine universities and colleges. Toronto: James Lorimer.

Bryson, C. (2004). The consequences for women in the academic profession of the widespread use of fixed term contracts. Gender, work and organization, 11(2), 187-206. doi: 10.1111/j. 1468-0432.2004.00228.x

Carayol, N., & Matt, M. (2004). Does research organization influence academic production? Laboratory level evidence from a large European university. Research Policy, 33, 1081-1102. doi: 10.1016/j.respol.2004.03.004

Davis, K. (2001). Peripheral and subversive: Women making connections and challenging the boundaries of the science community. Science Education, 85(4), 368-409. doi: 10.1002/sce.1015

Dever, M., & Morrison, Z. (2009). Women, research performance and work context. Tertiary Education and Management, 15(1), 49-62. doi: 10.1080/13583880802700107

Devos, A. (2007). Women, research and the politics of professional development. Studies in Higher Education, 29(5), 591-604. doi: 10.1080/0307507042000261562

Doherty, L., & Manfredi, S. (2005). Improving women's representation in senior positions in the higher education sector, stage findings. Oxford: Centre for Diversity Policy Research, Oxford Brookes University.

Evans, L. (2012). Leadership for Researcher Development: What Research Leaders Need to Know and Understand. Educational Management Administration and Leadership, 40(4), 423-435. doi: 10.1177/1741143212438218

Gardiner, M., Tiggemann, M., Kearns, H., & Marshall, K. (2007). Show me the money! An empirical analysis of mentoring outcomes for women in academia. Higher Education Research and Development, 26, 425-442. doi: 10.1080/07294360701658633

Grbich, C. (1998). The academic researcher: Socialisation in settings previously dominated by teaching. Higher Education, 36, 67-85. doi: 10.1023/A:1003104311001

Griffiths, R. (2004). Knowledge production and the research-teaching nexus in eight advanced-industrialized countries. Higher Education, 34, 397-420.

Guillarmon, C. (2011). Los condicionantes de la carrera investigadora en la Universidad que encuentran las mujeres In M. Tomas (Ed.), La Universidad vista desde una perspectiva de genero. Barcelona: Octaedro.

Hagstrom, W. O. (1967). Competition and teamwork in science. Final report to the national Science Foundation for research grant GS-657. Madison: Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin.

Heinze, T., Shapira, P., Rogers, J. D., & Senker, J. M. (2009). Organizational and institutional influences on creativity in scientific research. ResearchPolicy, 38(4), 610-623. doi: 10.1016/j.respol.2009.01.014

Higgs, J. (2003). Making a difference. In H. Edwards, D. Baume, & G. Webb (Eds.), Staff and educational development: Case studies, experience and practice from higher education. Sterling, VA/London: Kogan.

Hobson, J., Jones, G., & Deane, E. (2005). The research assistant: Silenced partner in Australia's knowledge production? Journal of Higher Education Policy and Mangement, 27, 357-366. doi: 10.1080/13600800500283890

Lafferty, G., & Fleming, J. (2000). The restructuring of academic work in Australia: Power, management and gender. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 21, 257-267. doi: 10.1080/713655344

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, M.A.: Cambridge University Press. doi: 10.1017/CBO9780511815355

Lazega, E.; Mounier, L.; Jourda, M. T., & Stofer, R. (2006). Organizational vs. personal social capital in scientists' performance: A multilevel network study of elite French cancer researchers (1996-1998). Scientometrics, 67(1), 27-44. doi:10.1007/s11192-006-0049-5

Long, S. (1978). Productivity and academic position in the scientific career. American Sociological Review, 43(6), 889-908. doi: 10.2307/2094628

Luukkonen, T. (2012). Conservatism and risk-taking in peer review: Emerging ERC practices. Research Evaluation, 21(1), 48-60. doi: 10.1093/reseval/rvs001

McLaren, M. (2002). Feminism, Foucault and embodied subjectivity. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Morley, L. (2003). Quality and Power in higher education. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Nowotny, H. (1989). Individual autonomy and autonomy of science: the place of the individual in the research system. In S. E. Cozzens et al. (Eds.), The research system in transition Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Poole, M., Bornholt, L., & Summers, F. (1997). An international study of the gendered nature of academic work: some cross cultural explorations. Higher Education, 34, 373-396. doi: 10.1023/A:1003075907126

Rocha, J. R., Marin, Sampere, M. J., & Sebastian, J. (2008). Estructura y dinamica de los grupos de investigacion. Arbor, 732, 743-757.

Sadler, R. (1999). Managing your academic career: strategies for success. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

Seglen, P. O., & Aksnes, D. (2000). Scientific Productivity and Group Size: A Bibliometric Analysis of Norwegian Microbiological Research. Scientometrics, 49, 1, 125-143. doi: 10.1023/A:1005665309719

Sagaria, M., & Agans, L. (2006). Gender equality in US higher education: International framing and institutional realities. Higashi, Hiroshima City: Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

Smeby, S., & Try, S. (2005). Departmental contexts and faculty research activity in Norway. Research in Higher Education, 46, 593-619. doi: 10.1007/s 11162-004-4136-2

Stephan, P. E., & Levin, S. G. (1997). The critical importance of careers in collaborative scientific research. Revue d'economie industrielle, 79, 45-61. doi: 10.3406/rei.1997.1652

Subramaniam, N. (2003). Factors affecting the career progress of academic accountants in Australia: Cross-institutional and gender perspectives. Higher Education, 46, 507-542. doi: 10.1023/A:1027388311727

Tomas, M., Duran, M. M., Guillarmon, C., & Lavie, J. M. (2008). Profesoras universitarias y cargos de gestion. Contextos educativos, 11, 113-129.

Toren, N. (1993). The temporal dimension of gender inequality in academia. Higher Education, 25, 439-455. doi:10.1007/BF01383846

Travaille, A. E., & Hendriks, P. (2010). What keeps science spiralling? Unravelling the critical success factors of knowledge creation in university research. Higher Education, 59, 423-439. doi: 10.1007/s 10734-009-9257-2

Von Tunzelman, N., Ranga, M., Martin, B., & Geuna, A. (2003). The effects of size on research performance: A SPRU review, Brighton: University of Sussex.

Walby, S., & Olsen, W. (2002). The impact of women's position in the labour market on pay and implications for UK productivity. Department for Trade and Industry. Retrieved from http://www.womenandequalityunit.gov.uk/pay/research.htm#impact

Con el fin de llegar a un mayor numero de lectores, NAER ofrece traducciones al espanol de sus articulos originales en ingles. Sin embargo, este articulo en espanol no es el articulo original sino unicamente su traduccion. Si quiere citar este articulo por favor consulte el articulo original en ingles y utilice la paginacion del mismo en sus citas. Gracias.

Georgeta Ion *

Departament de Pedagogia Aplicada, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona {georgeta.ion@uab.cat}

Recibido el 27 Septiembre 2013; revised el 2 Octubre 2013; aceptado el 21 Noviembre 2013; publicado el 15 Julio 2014

DOI: 10.7821/naer.3.2.59-66

* Por correo postal dirigirse a:

Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Edificio G6, 248

08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Valles)

Espana
COPYRIGHT 2014 Universidad de Alicante
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2014 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:ORIGINAL
Author:Ion, Georgeta
Publication:NAER - Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research
Date:Jul 1, 2014
Words:14654
Previous Article:Developments in transnational research linkages: evidence from U.S. higher-education activity/Los avances en los vinculos de investigacion...
Next Article:An interdisciplinary study in initial teacher training/Experiencia interdisciplinaria en la formacion inicial de maestros.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |