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USE CARE WHEN JUMP STARTING A VEHICLE, AAA WARNS MOTORISTS

 USE CARE WHEN JUMP STARTING A VEHICLE, AAA WARNS MOTORISTS
 CHARLOTTE, N.C., Nov. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Using the wrong procedure to jump-start a dead car battery can result in an explosion, damage to a car's electrical system or serious personal injury, the AAA Carolina Motor Club warns.
 "Correctly jump-starting a car is essential because batteries contain liquid acid and a potentially explosive gas," said Ralph Peters, president of the motor club.
 Unlike the batteries used to power toys and flashlights, an improperly connected car battery can damage electrical components.
 When attempting to jump-start a car, never smoke or work near an open flame, and remove all jewelry to reduce the chance of a spark caused by accidental contact with a battery post. Always wear safety glasses, use good quality cables and never attempt to jump-start a battery that is cracked or damaged.
 Prior to jump-starting, make sure all battery cables are attached securely and beware of moving engine parts. Check the battery posts for acid build-up and clean, if necessary.
 -- Park cars close enough for jumper cables to be connected but
 do not allow vehicles to touch. On both vehicles, put the
 transmission in park, or neutral for manual transmissions. Turn
 off engines and all electrical accessories. Apply the parking
 brakes.
 -- Connect one end of the positive cable -- usually red or
 marked with a plus (+) sign -- to the positive terminal of the
 battery providing the jump. Connect the other end of the
 positive cable to the positive terminal of the dead battery.
 -- Connect one end of the negative cable -- usually black or
 marked with a negative (-) sign -- to the negative terminal
 of the battery providing the jump.
 -- Connect the other end of the negative cable to an unpainted,
 metallic surface -- such as an engine bolt on the car with
 the dead battery. Do no connect the negative cable to the
 negative terminal of the dead battery because a spark will
 result which can ignite battery gases and cause an explosion.
 -- Start the engine on the car providing the jump. When you
 attempt to start the disabled vehicle, follow the starting
 procedures outlined in the owner's manual and don't crank the
 starter for more than 10 seconds. If it doesn't start, let
 the starter cool for several minutes before trying again.
 -- Once the disabled car is running, disconnect the jumper cables in
 the reverse order from which they were connected.
 Because headlight use increases during fall and winter months due to shorter daylight hours and bad weather, more motorists forget to turn headlights off and are unable to start their cars.
 "Vehicle manufacturers can help minimize this problem if they will design vehicles that automatically turn headlights off when the ignition key is removed, but allow motorists to leave parking lights on," Peters said. Parking lights draw far less current than headlights, allowing the car to be started up to several hours later if they are left on.
 Founded in 1922 the AAA Carolina Motor Club has grown to more than a half-million members throughout the two Carolinas.
 -0- 11/20/91 R
 /CONTACT: Quentin Anderson or Carol Schmauch, AAA Carolina Motor Club, 704-377-3600 or (nights) 704-542-9623/ CO: AAA Carolina Motor Club ST: North Carolina, South Carolina IN: AUT SU:


CM -- CH009 -- 5552 11/20/91 16:00 EST
COPYRIGHT 1991 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 20, 1991
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