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UNITED AIRLINES B727 AIRCRAFT CRUISES ACROSS LAKE SHORE DRIVE ON ITS WAY TO NEW HOME AT MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY

 CHICAGO, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Commuters will yield right-of-way to an uncommon motorist today when a United Airlines B727 aircraft crosses Lake Shore Drive on its way to the Museum of Science and Industry. The 34-foot-tall, 108-foot-wide plane merges onto the thoroughfare on its way to become the centerpiece of the museum's "Take Flight" aviation exhibit, which is scheduled to open in October 1994.
 United Airlines donated the aircraft to the museum last year after it completed a historic landing at Chicago's lakefront airport, Meigs Field. The B727 was the largest jet aircraft ever to land at Meigs Field. After spending one year in storage at Indiana's Burns Harbor, the aircraft journeyed north up Lake Michigan via barge yesterday, then will cross the 57th Street Beach, Lake Shore Drive and the museum's parking lot today. At the end of October, it is scheduled to enter the museum through a west wall.
 The partnership of two Chicago hometown favorites -- United Airlines and the Museum of Science and Industry -- has proved to be a perfect blend of airline expertise with museum creativity.
 Using resources from its flight, inflight and maintenance operations areas, United Airlines has worked with the museum since 1991 to develop a complete design for the "Take Flight" exhibit. In partnership with the Boeing Airplane Company and Pratt & Whitney, United and the Museum of Science and Industry also are solving the challenge of attaching the 41-ton, 133-foot-long B727 aircraft to the museum's balcony.
 When completed next year, the aviation exhibit will be another showpiece display for the Museum of Science and Industry, combining technology, ingenuity, education and entertainment for Chicago and the world to enjoy.
 UNITED AIRLINES B727 FACTS
 -- The B727 aircraft was built by Boeing and purchased by United Airlines in 1964.
 -- During its commercial lifespan from 1964 to 1991, the B727 flew 28 million miles, equivalent to circling the globe more than 3,500 times.
 -- The aircraft also spent more than 66,000 hours in the air, equivalent to 7-1/2 years in the Friendly Skies.
 -- At 133 feet, the plane is nearly half a football field long, and its 108-foot wingspan can easily accommodate 60 members of the Chicago Bears sitting side-by-side on each wing.
 -- The aircraft is as high as a three-story building from the top of its vertical stabilizer to the bottom of its wheels.
 -- While it was in service for United Airlines, the aircraft carried more than 3 million passengers, equivalent to the populations of Chicago and Milwaukee combined.
 -- The aircraft was powered by three Pratt & Whitney JT8-D engines, providing up to 45,000 pounds of thrust, enough power to lift five elephants into the air.
 -- On Sept. 28, 1992, the United Airlines B727 was the largest aircraft ever to land at Chicago's Meigs Field.
 -- This month, the aircraft becomes the largest vehicle to ever travel down Chicago's Lake Shore Drive.
 -0- 9/22/93
 /CONTACT: John Kiker, 708-952-4162, Joe Hopkins, 708-952-5770, Tony Molinaro, 708-952-4971, or night, 708-952-4088; Investors, Pamela Hanlon, 708-952-7501/
 (UAL)


CO: UAL Corp.; United Airlines ST: Illinois IN: AIR SU:

SM -- NY037 -- 4650 09/22/93 11:39 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 22, 1993
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