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U.S. travel and tourism satellite accounts.

The U.S. travel and tourism satellite accounts show a detailed picture of the travel and tourism industries and their role in the U.S. economy (see table 1). These accounts were developed by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, with the support of the Tourism Industries Office of the International Trade Administration, in order to more accurately measure the contribution of travel and tourism to the economy.

These accounts present estimates of the expenditures by tourists, or visitors, for 20 types of commodities (see table 2) and estimates of the output of 20 travel and tourism industries. The accounts also present estimates of the income generated by travel and tourism and estimates of employment in the travel and tourism industries.

The travel and tourism accounts are extensions of the U.S. input-output accounts. The methods that are used to prepare the travel and tourism accounts are consistent with the methods used to estimate U.S. gross domestic product, national income, and other national economic measures.

The travel and tourism satellite accounts show

* The total sales of travel industries, like airlines, and of tourism industries, like hotels

* The expenditures for tourism as a share of GDP

* The value added by tourism industries

* The employment and employee compensation accounted for by the travel and tourism industries

* The demand for tourism (measured by tourists' spending)

Uses of the accounts

The travel and tourism satellite accounts can be used to determine the size of tourism and the components of travel and tourism.

Specifically, these accounts can be used

* To determine the shares of the goods and services that were sold to visitors and the shares that were sold to local residents

* To assess the effect of travel and tourism on the U.S. economy

* To examine the relationship among the travel and tourism industries

* To determine the expenditures of tourists

* To compare travel and tourism industries to other manufacturing and services industries

Availability

For more detailed information, see the article on the accounts for 1996 and 1997 by Sumiye Okubo and David Kass that was published in the July 2000 SURVEY OF CURRENT BUSINESS, the monthly journal of the Bureau.

This article and the prototype accounts are also available on the Internet at our Web site at <www.bea.doc.gov>.
Table 1. Key Indicators of Travel and Tourism Activity in 1992,
1996, and 1997

 Demand Value added
Level
 1992 $284.2-$332.8 billion $120,500-$135,700
 1996 $370.7-$437.5 billion $160,200-$186,300
 1997 $392.4-$462.3 billion $172,300-$200,600

Share
 1992 4.6-5.3 percent 1.9-2.2 percent
 1996 4.7-5.6 percent 2.1-2.4 percent
 1997 4.7-5.6 percent 2.1-2.4 percent

Average annual
 growth rate
1992-96 6.9-7.1 percent 7.4-8.2 percent
1992-97 6.7-6.8 percent 7.4-8.1 percent

 Employment
Level
 1992 3,749-4,353
 1996 4,255-5,206
 1997 4,302-5,263

Share
 1992 3.2-3.7 percent
 1996 3.4-4.1 percent
 1997 3.3-4.0 percent

Average annual
 growth rate
1992-96 3.2-4.6 percent
1992-97 2.8-3.9 percent

NOTE. Demand is tourism demand less travel by U.S. residents abroad.
Table 2. Tourism Demand by Commodity in 1992, 1996, and 1997

[Millions of dollars in purchasers' prices]

 Tourism demand

 Commodity 1992 1996 1997

Hotels and lodging
 places 56,577 70,229 74,103
Eating and drinking
 places 48,685 58,256 61,022
Passenger rail 1,226 1,217 1,296
Passenger bus and other
 local transportation 3,934 4,603 4,841
Taxicabs 3,002 4,043 4,298
Domestic passenger
 air fares 48,466 60,529 64,856
International air fares 32,159 40,760 45,156
Passenger water 4,150 4,490 4,384
Auto and truck rental 12,132 20,553 21,092
Other vehicle rental 209 452 485
Arrangement of passenger
 transportation 2,919 3,761 3,766
Recreation and
 entertainment 15,500 29,434 32,202
Participant sports 3,678 5,103 5,311
Movie, theater, ballet,
 and musical events 4,673 5,987 6,511
Sports events 1,385 1,738 1,763
Travel by U.S. residents
 abroad 39,964 49,452 53,451
Gasoline and oil 11,864 14,217 14,371
Personal consumption
 expenditure nondurable
 commodities other than
 gasoline and oil 37,362 50,722 52,745
Parking, automotive
 repair, and highway
 tolls 7,008 9,066 9,514

Total 334,893 434,613 461,166

 Average annual
 growth rate

 Commodity 1992-96 1992-97

Hotels and lodging
 places 5.6 5.5
Eating and drinking
 places 4.6 4.6
Passenger rail -0.2 1.1
Passenger bus and other
 local transportation 4.0 4.2
Taxicabs 7.7 7.4
Domestic passenger
 air fares 5.7 6.0
International air fares 6.1 7.0
Passenger water 2.0 1.1
Auto and truck rental 14.1 11.7
Other vehicle rental 21.3 18.3
Arrangement of passenger
 transportation 6.5 5.2
Recreation and
 entertainment 17.4 15.7
Participant sports 8.5 7.6
Movie, theater, ballet,
 and musical events 6.4 6.9
Sports events 5.8 4.9
Travel by U.S. residents
 abroad 5.5 6.0
Gasoline and oil 4.6 3.9
Personal consumption
 expenditure nondurable
 commodities other than
 gasoline and oil 7.9 7.1
Parking, automotive
 repair, and highway
 tolls 6.6 6.3

Total 6.7 6.6


For more information Call Sumiye Okubo, the Associate Director for Industry Accounts, at 202-606-9612, or e-mail sumiye.okubo@bea.doc.gov, or call Mark A. Planting, Chief of the Annual Input-Output Branch, at 202-606-5584 or e-mail mark.planting@bea.doc.gov.
COPYRIGHT 2002 U.S. Government Printing Office
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
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Publication:Survey of Current Business
Article Type:Statistical Data Included
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Feb 1, 2002
Words:951
Previous Article:Gross domestic product by industry.
Next Article:U.S. transportation satellite accounts.
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