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U.S. teenage birthrate continues to fall. (FYI).

For the 10th consecutive year, the birthrate among U.S. women aged 15-19 declined between 2000 and 2001; the 5% drop brought the rate to an all-time low of 45.9 births per 1,000 teenagers. (1) The decline was greater among 15-17-year-olds (8%) than among older adolescents (4%). Black teenagers and white women registered the largest declines (8% and 7%, respectively), and young women of Hispanic descent, the smallest (2%); intermediate declines occurred among Asians and Pacific Islanders (5%) and among American Indians (3%). Since 1991, the teenage birthrate has fallen by 26%; declines have been above average among 15-17-year-olds (35%) and black adolescents (37%). Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson commented that the nation has reached "an important milestone" in the fight to prevent teenage pregnancy, but he urges continued efforts at the community level.

(1.) Department of Health and Human Services, HHS report shows teen birth rate falls to new record low in 2001, news release, June 6, 2002, <www.hhs. gov/news/press/2002pres/20020606. html>, accessed June 6, 2002.
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Author:Hollander, Dore
Publication:Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jul 1, 2002
Words:176
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