Printer Friendly

U.S. TEXTILE INDUSTRY FINDS NEW APPROACHES TO MANAGING CHANGE IN BUSINESS CONDITIONS, POLITICAL CLIMATE

 NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 19 /PRNewswire/ -- U.S. textile leaders are using bold new approaches to manage recent changes in business conditions and the political climate, the president of the industry's association said today.
 M.L. Cates Jr., president of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute (ATMI), said "abundant and accelerating" changes in the world political order, international trade, the U.S. federal government and the workforce require "new approaches and new ideas."
 "Change presents opportunities," he told those attending ATMI's 44th annual meeting. "Change can be for the better if we are prepared to deal with change."
 The U.S. textile industry, he said, is "striving to have a less adversarial, more cooperative relationship with the government." He cited examples of positive approaches adopted by the U.S. textile industry, including:
 (1) Support for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). "We strongly support NAFTA because it can provide growth opportunities for our industry and the nation in general," Cates said. "The NAFTA advantage is that we will be able to compete better in our own market against the Far East. And we can take advantage of opportunities in a growing Mexican market."
 (2) Edui?onal programs conducted by the industry for officials of the Customs Service and Commerce and Agriculture departments.
 (3) The recent endorsement by both U.S. and European textile leaders of a new set of trade principles "designed to ensure that trade is fair and that no country profits from slave labor, or child labor or by polluting the environment."
 U.S. textile industry leaders are working with the Clinton Administration in hopes of incorporating these principles into the Uruguay Round of trade talks, in place of the present textile proposal, Cates said.
 That proposal, embraced by the Bush Administration, would have a devastating impact on the domestic textile industry by causing the loss of more than 1 million jobs and further opening the U.S. market to countries with closed markets, Cates said.
 (4) A partnership just formed between the national laboratories of the Department of Energy and the U.S. fiber, textile and apparel industry to cooperate in joint research and development. Known as "AMTEX," the partnership will transfer technology in joint research and development efforts to help enhance the competitiveness of the industry.
 "This could put us on the list of those manufacturers who are going to be here tomorrow, those who add jobs and those who contribute significantly to the economy, those manufacturers worth fighting for," Cates said.
 (5) Promotion of the "Quick Response" concept to streamline production and distribution processes among fiber, textile and apparel manufacturers and retailers.
 (6) Training employees to enhance their basic and technical skills. Commitment to people is the "most fundamental tool for managing all change," Cates said.
 (7) Investment in high technology by the U.S. textile industry, to the tune of some $2 billion a year.
 (8) Two ATMI programs -- "Encouraging Environmental Excellence" and a new "Quest for the Best in Safety and Health," which highlight the commitment of individual textile companies to a clean environment and safe workplace.
 (9) Active involvement in shaping comprehensive health care reform.
 ATMI, the national trade association of the U.S. textile industry, provides international trade, government relations, economic information, communications services and product information in support of the industry.
 -0- 3/19/93
 /CONTACT: Deborah E. Anderson or James A. Morrissey of the American Textile Manufacturers Institute, in Nashville, 615-889-1000/


CO: American Textile Manufacturers Institute ST: Tennessee IN: TEX SU:

RA-BN -- AT006 -- 7893 03/19/93 12:15 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 19, 1993
Words:590
Previous Article:MEDIQ DECLARES QUARTERLY CASH DIVIDEND
Next Article:CP&L SUPPORTS PROTECTION OF RARE PLANTS
Topics:


Related Articles
TEXTILE LEADER ENCOURAGES CLINTON ADMINISTRATION TO CONCENTRATE ON MANUFACTURING JOBS, INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Hot topics in a hot climate.
Thomaston Mills, Inc. Reports Earnings
Taking stock: analyzing the past four years in the South African nonwovens industry.
FURNITURE VENDORS INCLUDED IN BROADENED TEXTILES LOBBY.
FABRIC MAKERS ARE HOPING FOR STRONG BUSINESS AT SHOWTIME.
Schoeller Wins Frost & Sullivan Award.
'This deplorable neglect of our last industries'.
Get ready for OUR big week; The Yorkshire and Humberside region produces 20% of the UK's fashion and textile design graduates, a figure that the...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters