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U.S. EPA BEGINS DISPOSAL OF SAN FELIPE ROAD GAS CYLINDERS

 SAN FRANCISCO, April 7 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) today announced it is taking charge of the disposal of 28 abandoned cylinders of potentially hazardous compressed gas found on San Felipe Road in Santa Clara County. The cylinders are currently held in secure storage at the United Technologies Chemical Systems facility at 600 Metcalf Rd., San Jose.
 "Until the cylinders are properly removed, they pose a potential threat to anyone who might come in contact with their contents," said Jeff Zelikson, director of hazardous waste management for U.S. EPA's western region. "U.S. EPA's Superfund emergency response program has the capability to get this job done safely and efficiently."
 The cylinders were found by a passing motorist in a creek bed just off San Felipe Road about 10 miles southeast of downtown San Jose. The San Jose Fire Department Hazardous Materials Team inspected the site and found that labels on the cylinders indicated the contents to be various poisonous, flammable and explosive gases, including chlorine, ethylene, and monosilane. Representatives of the nearby United Technologies Chemical Systems facility volunteered to provide safe temporary storage.
 The first phase of disposal, which began this week and is expected to take five working days, involves the collection of samples from each of the 28 cylinders. Then the samples will be analyzed and the most appropriate methods of treatment or disposal will be chosen. Finally, the cylinders will be transported for treatment, disposal or consumption.
 A continuing investigation by the Santa Clara County Health Department and County District Attorney's office has so far been unable to determine the source of the cylinders. The disposal operation is expected to cost up to $200,000.
 Since 1980, U.S. EPA has completed over 2,700 emergency response actions. The Superfund emergency response program deals with imminent threats to human health and the environment. These situations range from acute, life-threatening hazardous substance spills to complex situations involving improper management of hazardous waste.
 -0- 4/7/93
 /CONTACT: Dave Schmidt of U.S. EPA, 415-744-1578/


CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: California IN: ENV SU:

356 04-07-93 15:35 EDT GT -- SF002 -- 3873 04/07/93 15:38 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 7, 1993
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