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U.S. COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS APPOINTS 12 TO ITS SOUTH CAROLINA ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 ATLANTA, Aug. 24 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights announced the appointment of 12 people to its South Carolina Advisory Committee. The advisory committee assists the federal commission in its factfinding and investigative functions in South Carolina. The committee's chairperson is Gilbert B. Zimmerman of Beaufort. Other members of the committee are Rudolph C. Barnes Jr. from Prosperity; Dr. Oscar P. Butler and Charles Hiram Williams from Orangeburg; Dr. Marianna White Davis, Dr. Milton Kimpson, Mary Dunlap Snead, Samuel J. Tenenbaum and Harold Andrew White from Columbia; Mary Pentreath Latham Miller and Bishop Johnnie M. Smith from Greenville; and Arleen Bonita-Cook Reid from Charleston.
 Gilbert Zimmerman is director of operation and planning at the Economic Opportunity Commission for Beaufort/Jasper Counties. Zimmerman is actively involved with several professional and social action agencies including: Beaufort-Jasper Low-Income Housing Coalition; the board of governors, S.C. Low-Income Housing Coalition; and second vice president, S.C. Association for Human Service Agencies.
 Rudolph C. Barnes Jr. is a prominent attorney in private practice in Prosperity. He is formerly the senior partner of the law firm Barnes and Bufkin. A Republican politician, he was elected to several terms as a member of the Columbia City Council, serving from 1978-1986. He was director and president of the Richland-Lexington Council on Aging from 1971-1986; and a member of the executive committee of the Greater Columbia Community Relations Council from 1971-1986.
 Dr. Oscar P. Butler Jr. is an educator at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. He is the former vice president of the university. Butler is on the Citizens Advisory Committee for School District Five in Orangeburg and is a member of several professional organizations including: American Personnel and Guidance Association; American Association for Higher Education; National Association of Student Personnel Administrators; and South Carolina Personnel Association.
 Dr. Marianna White Davis is a teacher at Keenan High School in Columbia. She is also visiting co-director of teacher training at Northeastern University in Boston. She was formerly a professor of English at Claflin College, Benedict College and South Carolina State University, over a period of 15 years.
 Dr. Milton Kimpson is deputy commissioner of the South Carolina Department of Corrections. He is a prominent state official, having served previously as commissioner of the South Carolina Workers Compensation Commission; executive assistant to the governor for health, education and human services; and as chairman of the Governor's Task Force on Affirmative Action.
 Mary Pentreath Latham Miller is vice president of construction for the Pentreath Company in Greenville. She is a former member on the board of directors, American Cancer Society. Currently, Miller is a member of the South Carolina Board of Juvenile Parole, having served as secretary, vice chairman and chairman since 1987. She is active in community affairs dealing with civil rights.
 Arleen Bonita-Cook Reid has been the news editor for Charleston's African-American newspaper, The Coastal Times, since 1989. She has worked on several civil rights violation cases through the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission. She is a member of the S.C. Coastal Association of Black Journalists; National Association of Black Journalists; state chairperson, S.C. National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer; and Charleston branch of NAACP.
 Bishop Johnnie Smith is founder and pastor of Evangelistic Temples, Inc., in Greenville. He is president of Greenville Ministerial Fellowship and vice-chairman of the South Carolina Human Relations Commission. He has held membership in various professional organizations including: chairperson, Affirmative Action Committee- United Way; Phyllis Wheatley Association Board of Directors; and Roundtable on Aging Committee.
 Mary Dunlap Snead is director of staff development and training for the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission in Columbia. She has 15 years experience in affirmative action and related employment discrimination issues. Prior to her current position, Snead was a research associate for the University of South Carolina. She has developed and conducted hundreds of workshops for managers and supervisors in the areas of affirmative action and employment law.
 Samuel J. Tenenbaum is vice president of sales and marketing for Chatham Steel Corporation in Columbia. He is active in many political, religious and social action agencies. He is a member of the South Carolina Legislative Committee on Energy; South Carolina Holocaust Council; board of advisors of Planned Parenthood of the Midlands; Community Relations Council of Columbia; southeast regional Anti- Defamation League of B'nai B'rith; Columbia Jewish Federation and the Black-Jewish Coalition.
 Harold Andrew White is assistant athletic director at the University of South Carolina (USC) in Columbia. He has been an advocate of human rights and opportunities for many years. He has served on the board of directors and as chairperson of Community Care, Inc., and as vice president of the USC's Affirmative Action Policy Committee. White was appointed to USC's Task Force on Campus Sexual Assault in spring 1992.
 Charles Hiram Williams III is a partner with the law firm Williams & Williams in Orangeburg. He has served as president of the Orangeburg County Chapter of the Red Cross and has been a member of the board of trustees of South Carolina State University since 1985. Williams has been active in the promotion of civil rights in the Orangeburg community by assisting in a number of campaigns for minority and women candidates for public office.
 Working in coordination with the commission's Southern Regional Office in Atlanta, the South Carolina Advisory Committee conducts factfinding reviews on civil rights problems and publishes reports of its factfindings and recommendations.
 The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, first established by Congress in 1957, is an independent, bipartisan, factfinding agency of the federal government concerned with discrimination based on color, race, religion, sex, age, handicap, national origin or in the administration of justice. Bobby D. Doctor is director of the Southern Regional Office.
 -0- 8/24/93
 /CONTACT: Bobby D. Doctor, Southern Regional Office, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 404-730-2476/


CO: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights ST: South Carolina IN: SU: PER

DC-TW -- DC013 -- 5493 08/24/93 13:52 EDT
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Date:Aug 24, 1993
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