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U.S., UKRAINE AND RUSSIA COOPERATIVELY DEMONSTRATE CLEAN AIR TECHNOLOGY

U.S., UKRAINE AND RUSSIA COOPERATIVELY DEMONSTRATE CLEAN AIR TECHNOLOGY
 RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C., Oct. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Using a unique combination of talents and equipment, the U.S., Ukraine and Russia have cut by 60 percent nitrogen oxide emissions from a boiler at the Ladyzhin Power Station in the Ukraine.
 Nitrogen oxides contribute to acid rain, forest damage, smog and poor visibility. In the United States, better controls over nitrogen oxide emissions are key to helping areas whose ozone levels exceed the national air quality standard.
 "The Ladyzhin test marks a first," U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly said. "For 20 years, since the U.S. and the former Soviet Union entered a cooperative environmental agreement, we have exchanged information. Now, for the first time, we have cooperated on a full-scale, field demonstration, with significant environmental benefits. Our common environmental concerns have helped bring three countries closer together."
 Wet-bottom boilers like the one at Ladyzhin are common in Eastern Europe, an area plagued by air pollution problems. The Ukraine has 85 of these boilers and Russia, a large number also.
 "Reburn," the technology used at Ladyzhin, is the lowest cost method for retrofitting wet-bottom boilers. Wet-bottom boilers are not amenable to traditional technologies, such as low NOx burners, for reducing nitrogen oxides. Other add-on technologies can cost up to two or more times as much per ton of nitrogen oxides reduced as reburn.
 Each country participating in this demonstration has a specific role and benefits in its own way from the tests.
 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, working with one of its contractors, ABB Combustion Engineering, Windsor, Conn., developed a design concept for modifying the Ladyzhin boiler.
 The Russian Heat Engineering Institute (formerly the All-Union Heat Engineering Institute) prepared detailed engineering drawings for the boiler modification and finalized the design.
 The Ukraine modified the boiler, shutting it down in March 1992 and bringing it back on line in late August 1992.
 The U.S. has been able to demonstrate reburn on a full-scale, wet- bottom boiler without paying the costs of retrofitting. For the Ukraine and Russia, the tests will provide proven technology that can reduce significantly nitrogen oxide emissions from boilers commonly used in their countries.
 In late September, a five-member U.S. team, led by Robert E. Hall of EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory in the Research Triangle Park, N.C., was on hand for the joint tests and to coordinate data quality assurance.
 When these initial tests were completed, Anatoly Gritsenko, First Deputy, Ministry of Power and Electrification of the Ukraine, announced the promising results on Ukrainian national radio.
 Tests will continue through January 1993 to determine what happens when operating parameters are varied.
 If the technology continues to prove successful, it could open new overseas markets for U.S. industry.
 The reburn technology involves three combustion stages or zones in a furnace. In the primary zone, nitrogen oxides are produced as in any other boiler. In the next stage, the reburn zone, additional fuel, in this case natural gas, is injected. The fuel-rich reburn zone converts the nitrogen oxides into nitrogen and water vapor, two substances that occur naturally in the atmosphere. The final zone is an oxygen-rich burnout stage that provides for complete combustion at low temperatures.
 During the 1980s, U.S. EPA engineers in the Research Triangle Park conducted in-house research to develop a better understanding of reburn in gas- and coal-fired combustors. EPA contracted with U.S. private industry to gain more information about how and why reburn works on coal-fired boilers.
 In late 1987, the U.S. EPA mentioned these studies to the then USSR in an information exchange. The two agreed to test reburn on a powerplant in the Ukraine.
 In 1991, the reburn concept was tested on Ohio Edison Company's Niles Power Plant near Warren, Ohio. Nitrogen oxide emissions from that "cyclone" boiler were cut in half. Three other demonstrations currently are taking place in the U.S. on cyclone, tangential and wall-fired boilers under the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Program.
 About one-third of the nitrogen oxide emissions in the United States come from electric powerplants and 12 percent from industrial combustion. Reburn is a potential way of decreasing emissions from these sources.
 In the future, the U.S., Russia and Ukraine plan to use two sites in Russia and one in the Ukraine to demonstrate a new, EPA-patented technology for controlling sulfur dioxide and particulate emissions from boilers. The technology, called E-SOx, is designed to be retrofitted on existing boilers. Sulfur dioxide and particulate matter are removed simultaneously in the electrostatic precipitator.
 -0- 10/28/92
 /CONTACT: Rhoda Ritzenberg, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 919-541-2615/ CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: North Carolina IN: UTI SU: PDT


CM -- CHFNS1 -- 5929 10/28/92 11:15 EST
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Date:Oct 28, 1992
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