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Tray, trivet, or tabletop: you start by smashing tile.

A smack with a hammer is all it takes to start the mosaics decorating the tray, trivet, and table featured on these pages. You'll need basic woodworking and tilesetting skills, but it's the arrangement of the broken tiles that gives the projects their unique character. Create a foundation for the tile First, you'll need a platform for the mosaic. You assemble the tray and trivet from scratch. The table can be store-bought, but you'll have to add a molding border. We colored all wood with a limed oak (semitransparent white) stain, then sealed it with mat-finish polyurethane. For assembly, you'll need wood glue, tacks, finishing nails, wood putty, and sandpaper. The serving tray starts with a 14- by 14inch base of 1/4-inch plywood. Ends, sides, and base supports were cut from a 6-foot length of 1/2- by 4-inch clear pine molding. Following the pattern above right, cut the pine pieces as follows: two 2- by 14-inch sides; two 3 1/4- by 15-inch ends (with handles); four 1 -inch-wide strips for base supports. For handles, in both end pieces drill two 1-inch-diameter holes with centers 5 inches apart; then cut out the space between. Cut a gentle curve along the top of these pieces so the ends are 2 inches tall. To assemble the tray, glue and tack base supports to the plywood. Next, glue and nail on the sides, countersinking the finishing nails. Fill nail holes and cracks with wood putty; sand when dry. The trivet takes a 15-inch square of 1/4inch plywood. Border and base supports are 1/2- by 3/4-inch molding; buy 7 feet. Using a compass, draw a 14-inch-diameter circle on the plywood. Next, starting at any point on the radius of the circle, mark the six 7-inch sides of the hexagon. Cut out the base. The border and base supports all have 60o angles cut into each end. You may wish to make a simple jig or miter box that positions the wood at a 60' angle to the cutting blade. Cut the base supports so outside edges measure 7 inches; cut perimeter molding so inside edges are 7 inches. Glue and nail. The end table starts with an unfinished table. Ours (clear pine) was 20 inches square. We glued and nailed a border of 1/4- by 1/4-inch molding (buy 7 feet) to the tabletop, creating a 1/4-inch-tall lip. Fill in with a colorful mosaic We designed our tile surfaces in two colors, but you can develop more complex combinations. The idea is to buy enough tiles to more than cover the surface area of the item you're making, then break them into smaller fragments. At a tile shop or home center, look for /4inch-thick tiles at least 4 inches square. You'll also need masking tape, tile adhesive and a notched trowel (see directions on adhesive container for notch size), white grout, grout additive, a tile float, and grout sealer. To make the mosaic, follow steps 1 through 5. Fill in odd-size spaces with tiniest tile chips. El
COPYRIGHT 1990 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Jun 1, 1990
Words:510
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