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Travel Safety Update.

Jan 22, 2007

US FAA creates new regulation for long-range jetliners. Airlines that fly for hours over oceans and polar regions must have a plan to take care of passengers and extinguish cargo fires in an emergency situation, the FAA said Monday. The latest generation of long-range jetliners can fly to virtually any destination in the world. The Air Transport Association says the rule will give airlines flying long routes with twin-engine jets flexibility to select more efficient routes. Jan 9, 2007

US FAA extended "most requirements previously applicable only to ... two-engine airplanes to a limited number of part 121 passenger-carrying three- and four-engine airplane operations," but the rule "excludes the ETOPS maintenance requirements from the operation of airplanes with more than two engines ... FAA has accepted the safety case that current engine reliabilities and the level of engine redundancy on such airplanes is sufficient to protect such operations." It estimated the cost of compliance with the new 300-page rule at $20.9 million for US airlines over a 16-year period. Jan 9, 2007

US FAA last week issued an NPRM requiring new aircraft to feature enhanced cabin, flightdeck and cargo hold protection against explosive devices or projectiles and the identification of "least risk bomb location" onboard affected aircraft. Comments on the NPRM are due April 5. Jan 9, 2007

US FAA unveiled its long-awaited and controversial Extended Operations rule yesterday that brings two-, three- and four-engine aircraft under a common regulation for long-haul operations with limited diversion airports. According to the agency, the new rule is "intended to eliminate propulsion system reliability as a consideration from the maximum diversion time capability of the airplane. Only the most time limiting airplane system capability [fire suppression, oxygen, etc.] will determine the maximum diversion time capability for a two-engine airplane under the new requirements." Jan 9, 2007

Adam Air, Boeing

Indonesian authorities appear to be closing in on the wreckage of the Adam Air 737-400 that was lost on Jan. 1 with 102 aboard. A fisherman reportedly found a section of what has been described as a piece of the aircraft's right horizontal stabilizer in the Makassar Strait some 185 mi. off Sulawesi Island. Reports continued to surface yesterday of more wreckage--at least 11 pieces--found floating nearby. USNS Mary Sears, an oceanographic survey ship, arrived in an area 125 mi. from where the tail wreckage was located to determine if metal detected by an Indonesian vessel on the sea floor also is from the ill-fated 737. More than 3,500 soldiers and volunteers are engaged in the search. Jan 12, 2007

Adam Air, Boeing

Indonesian Airliner Wreckage Found. Pieces of an Indonesian airliner that vanished with 102 people on board have been found strewn in the ocean, officials said on Thursday, after a painstaking 10 day search from jungles to stormy seas. Jan 11, 2007

Adam Air, Boeing

US Navy ship is expected to join the search today for the missing Adam Air 737-400 off the coast of Indonesia's Sulawesi Island, where the vessel will deploy high-tech equipment to help determine whether or not metal found on the ocean floor is from the 737's wreckage. Flight 574 disappeared from radar during a heavy rainstorm on Jan. 1 and all 102 aboard are feared dead. Jan 10, 2007

Adam Air, Boeing

Indonesian officials were attempting to determine late yesterday whether metal detected on the ocean floor off the coast of Sulawesi Island could be the wreckage of the missing Adam Air 737-400 that disappeared Jan. 1 in a heavy rainstorm. More than 100 passengers and crew aboard flight 574 are feared dead. Jan 9, 2007

Air Florida

Air Florida crash led to sweeping changes in aviation safety. The crash of Air Florida Flight 90 in Washington in 1982 had a dramatic effect on aviation, according to safety experts. The disaster helped change a cockpit culture dominated by captains. "This accident was pivotal because it helped draw attention to the fact that pilots need to communicate better," said Robert L. Sumwalt III, vice chairman of the NTSB and a former airline pilot. Jan 12, 2007

Denver International, Frontier Airlines, Airbus

US National Transportation Safety Board said it will investigate a Friday morning runway incursion incident at Denver International Airport in which a Frontier Airlines A319 was forced to execute a missed approach in order to avoid a Key Lime Air Swearingen Metroliner that "inadvertently" entered the runway. The aircraft missed each other by 50 ft., NTSB said. The Airport Movement Area Safety System alerted the tower at the same time that the Frontier pilots spotted the Metroliner. Jan 8, 2007

Kentucky Airport, Comair, Delta Air Lines

NTSB makes public some files on Comair crash. The NTSB today will open the public docket on the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Kentucky last August. The docket will include transcripts of the conversation between the Comair pilots and what the air traffic controller told the pilots from the airport's tower. The NTSB says the information is "factual in nature and does not provide analysis." Jan 17, 2007

New York LaGuardia Airport

US airlines, represented by the Air Transport Assn., strongly objected last week to US FAA's proposed new traffic management system for New York LaGuardia that would force carriers to operate larger aircraft or risk losing slots. ATA called the plan "burdensome and costly" and "incoherent and overreaching." FAA imposed new "temporary measures" from Jan. 1 that maintain the 75 scheduled flights per hr. limit that has governed LGA traffic under nonpermanent rules that were mandated by Congress to expire by the end of 2006. Jan 8, 2007

New York LaGuardia Airport

US FAA issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for LGA traffic last year that it is considering making final this year, but it would have to do so over the strenuous objections of airlines. FAA is seeking to reverse the trend of carriers operating lower-capacity regional jets to LGA, which it says leads to underutilization of the airport's terminals and other facilities and serves the needs of too few passengers. Jan 8, 2007

Ontario International

Technology glitch delays flights out of California's Ontario. Fourteen flights out of Ontario International Airport in California were delayed Wednesday after new telecommunications equipment that delivers information to controllers in a San Diego facility malfunctioned. Jan 11, 2007

01/22/2007

Z

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Jan 8, 2007
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Date:Jan 22, 2007
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