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Transportation chief moves to reduce truck paperwork inspection burden.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx has proposed elimination of a burdensome daily paperwork requirement for professional truck drivers that will reduce costs to the industry by an estimated $1.7 billion annually while still maintaining Department safety standards.

"President 0bama challenged his Administration to find ways to cut waste and red tape, a challenge I pledged to meet during my confirmation hearing," said Secretary Foxx. "With [this] proposal, we are delivering on that pledge, saving business billions of dollars while maintaining our commitment to safety. It's the kind of win-win solution that I hope our Department will continue to find over the coming months."

"This is a great example of the progress being made under the Administration's regulatory lookback initiative," added Office of Management and Budget Director Sylvia Mathews Burwell. "The Administration is carefully examining rules on the books to see where we can streamline, modify or repeal regulations to reduce unnecessary burdens and costs on businesses and consumers. By making this common-sense change to the [Driver Vehicle Inspection Report] DVIR process, the Department of Transportation is dramatically reducing paperwork burdens on the trucking industry, while continuing to protect public safety."

Current federal regulations require commercial truck drivers to conduct pre- and post-trip equipment inspections and file DVIRs after each inspection, regardless of whether or not an issue requiring repairs is identified. DVIRs are the 19th-highest paperwork burden, based on the number of hours needed to comply, imposed across all federal agencies and only 5 percent of reports filed include defects.

The DVIR streamlining announcement represents the largest paperwork reduction achieved since President 0bama's May 2012 Executive Order to reduce private sector regulatory burdens. Under the proposed change, commercial truck drivers would continue conducting pre- and post-trip inspections. However, DVIRs would be required only if defects or deficiencies were discovered by or reported to the driver during the day's operations.

"We can better focus on the 5 percent of problematic truck inspection reports by eliminating the 95 percent that report the status quo," said Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrator Anne Ferro. "Moving to a defect-only reporting system would reduce a significant paperwork burden facing truck drivers and save the industry billions without compromising safety."

Federal regulations require that every commercial vehicle in the U.S. undergo a thorough annual safety inspection conducted by a certified commercial vehicle mechanic. In addition, state and federal inspectors conduct unannounced, random commercial vehicle inspections; trucks that fail random safety inspections are immediately placed out of service and not allowed to operate until the identified safety problems are addressed. In 201Z, approximately 3.5 million random inspections were conducted.
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Title Annotation:GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS: REGULATIONS
Publication:Concrete Products
Date:Sep 1, 2013
Words:435
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