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Today in history -- August 4.

In 1892, Andrew and Abby Borden were axed to death in their home in Fall River. Lizzie Borden, Andrew's daughter from a previous marriage, was accused of the killings, but acquitted at trial.

Today is Monday, August 4, the 216th day of 2014. There are 149 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On August 4, 1944, 15-year-old diarist Anne Frank was arrested with her sister, parents and four others by the Gestapo after hiding for two years inside a building in Amsterdam. Anne and her sister, Margot, died the following year in a concentration camp.

On this date:

In 1735, a jury found John Peter Zenger of the New York Weekly Journal not guilty of committing seditious libel against the colonial governor of New York, William Cosby.

In 1830, plans for the city of Chicago were laid out.

In 1914, Britain declared war on Germany for invading Belgium; the United States proclaimed its neutrality in the mushrooming world conflict.

In 1916, the United States reached agreement with Denmark to purchase the Danish Virgin Islands for $25 million.

In 1964, the bodies of missing civil rights workers Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney were found buried in an earthen dam in Mississippi.

In 1972, Arthur Bremer was convicted and sentenced in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, to 63 years in prison for his attempt on the life of Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace (the sentence was later reduced to 53 years; Bremer was released in 2007).

In 1987, the Federal Communications Commission voted to abolish the Fairness Doctrine, which required radio and television stations to present balanced coverage of controversial issues.

Ten years ago: Richard Smith, a Staten Island ferry pilot, pleaded guilty to manslaughter in a crash that killed 11 in October 2003, acknowledging that he'd passed out at the helm after arriving at work with medication in his system.

Five years ago: North Korean leader Kim Jong Il pardoned American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee for entering the country illegally and ordered their release during a surprise visit by former U.S. President Bill Clinton.

One year ago: Security forces closed roads, put up extra blast walls and increased patrols near some of the more than 20 U.S. diplomatic missions in the Muslim world that Washington had ordered closed for the weekend because of al-Qaida threats.

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Publication:Telegram & Gazette (Worcester, MA)
Date:Aug 4, 2014
Words:391
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