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Through a glass darkly; Bernard Lonergan & Richard Rorty on knowing without a God's-eye view.

9780874626681

Through a glass darkly; Bernard Lonergan & Richard Rorty on knowing without a God's-eye view.

Snell, R.J.

Marquette University Press

2006

238 pages

$27.00

Paperback

Marquette studies in philosophy; No.45

BD161

It appears the modern project of attaining purely rational knowledge is declining, perhaps under its own weight. Philosophers have found that one of the key elements of the project, acquiring a "god's-eye view," may be a semantic and philosophical impossibility. Snell (philosophy, North Park U.) examines the causes of this disillusion and defends the human capacity to know by analyzing alternatives offered by the work of Richard Rorty and Bernard Lonergan, who differ in some ways but agree that philosophy has relied too much on intuitionism. Rorty's response, says Snell, is to welcome disillusion as a therapy and then radicalize it; Lonergan responds with transcendental theory or intentionality analysis. Snell works through the "end of philosophy" argument, the epistemology and hermeneutics of the questions, the issues of self-knowledge and the corresponding desire to know, the effects of contingency, and the relationship between critical realism and conversation.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Feb 1, 2007
Words:187
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