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They squeezed in a tennis court ... inconspicuously.

They squeezed in a tennis court . . . inconspicuously Shoehorning a tennis court into a tight lot often means the big playing surface will dominate the scene. The challenge is to find adequate room but make the court appear less intrusive.

Architect Victor H. Lee of Menlo Park, California, managed to place one right next to a house so it's hardly noticeable. Since part of the court is visible from the living room and extends into the garden, Lee disguised the exposed corner with a handsome redwood fence. With the same vertical 1-by-8 siding that covers the house walls, the fence seems a natural extension of the house. To keep the fence from seeming too massive, he varied its height from 6 to 8 feet and interrupted it with two sections of horizontal 1-by-2s.

A house wall serves as a part of the court's boundary. Lee repeated the 1-by-2 detailing in a panel that protects a large window. Horizontal banding at the base of the fence and a cap rail of 2-by-4s give a finished look.
COPYRIGHT 1985 Sunset Publishing Corp.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1985 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sunset
Date:Aug 1, 1985
Words:174
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