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Thermal exposure influences food intake in a sedentary office setting.

THERMAL EXPOSURE INFLUENCES FOOD INTAKE IN A SEDENTARY OFFICE SETTING MOLLY C. BERNHARD RICHARDSON (1,2), DAVID B. ALLISON (2), PENG LI (2), JULIA M. GOHLKE (1,2) (1) ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES, SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, (2) NUTRITION OBESITY RESEARCH CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM

We hypothesized that exposure to temperatures above the thermoneutral zone would decrease food intake in young adults (ages 19-35) in a sedentary office environment over a 2-hour period. Participants wearing standardized clothing were randomized to either a colder (18-19[degrees]C) or a warmer environment (25-27[degrees]C) under the artifice of monitoring routine office work (n=11 and 9, respectively). Thermal images of the inner canthus of their eye and middle finger nail bed, representing core and peripheral temperatures, respectively, were taken at baseline, 1st, and 2nd hour. Increased heat retention was estimated by an increased difference between core and peripheral temperature. After 1 hour, the difference between core and peripheral temperature in the cold group was significantly higher than that in warmer group (9.1 vs 2.7, p <0.0001), suggesting heat retention in the colder group. A significant correlation between heat retention and caloric intake (r=0.44, p=0.04) is detected. In a linear regression model (R2=0.68, p=0.0001) controlling for group, age, BMI, and gender, the caloric intake is significantly correlated with heat retention and the participants with 1[degrees]C greater difference in core and peripheral temperature at midpoint ate 88.9 more kcal (95%CI [49.5, 128.3], p=0.0005). There is a significant effect of gender and BMI on the caloric intake. This pilot study provided preliminary evidence that a warmer environment is associated with less caloric intake, potentially mediated through thermoregulatory mechanisms.

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Title Annotation:Health Sciences Poster Abstracts
Author:Richardson, Molly C. Bernhard; Allison, David B.; Li, Peng; Gohlke, Julia M.
Publication:Journal of the Alabama Academy of Science
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Apr 1, 2015
Words:294
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