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The separation of psychology and theology at Princeton, 1868-1903; the intellectual achievement of James McCosh and James Mark Baldwin.

0773459308

The separation of psychology and theology at Princeton, 1868-1903; the intellectual achievement of James McCosh and James Mark Baldwin.

Maier, Bryan N.

Edwin Mellen Pr.

2005

162 pages

$99.95

Hardcover

BF80

Maier (pastoral counseling and psychology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) concentrates on an institution that was considered the citadel of orthodox theology for the majority of the 19th century to explore how psychology displaced orthodox theology in American higher education. McCosh was the president of Princeton College, along with the seminary across the street. Baldwin became one of the most successful and well known of the earlier popularizers of psychology. Baldwin was a student of McCosh there at Princeton, and they continued to have a relationship while they both lived. In that relationship, he looks for some understanding of how psychology distanced itself from religion in general and orthodox theology specifically.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:May 1, 2006
Words:150
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