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The people: celebrities, adventurers and pillars of society. Meet some varieties of Sarasotans.

The People

Celebrities, adventurers and pillars of society. Meet some varieties of Sarasotans.

THE PHILANTHROPISTS

Barbara Hirsch York and Carolyn Michel. Heavily involved in the city's cultural life and charitable causes. "We are determined. We're small but mighty. We have tunnel vision and focus on what needs to be done." Recently presented Sarasota with the new sculpture in front of Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall. It's dedicated to Maurice Hirsch. Carolyn's late father. "My father would be pleased and embarrassed. He was a wonderful supporter of the arts. I come by all this naturally."

THE TROUBLEMAKER

Peter Uitenbosch. P.W.A. (person with AIDS), AIDS activist, founder AIDS Manasota. "I came here to retire, just like everybody else." About his diagnosis: "It's made me work harder than I've ever worked before. I'm much more aware of what the human race is all about... good and bad." About his well-publicized skirmishes with area dentists, fire departments and prison officials: "I sound a lot stronger than I should sometimes. The important thing is that the message gets out." About the future: "You don't have to die of AIDS. I'm healthy looking and I jog everyday. People are stunned I can do things like that. It's about survival."

THE RETIRED COUPLE

Richard and Vera Evans. Married 50 years. Two children, six grandchildren. He: president of the Windmill Village Civic Association. She: president of the shuffleboard club at Windmill Village. "We have a nice park. It's well kept. It's owned by a big corporation that owns a lot of parks across the U.S. It's a rental park. That means we rent the space our mobile homes are on. They're fair about the lot rent. It's geared to the cost of living... Shuffleboard doesn't require a lot of physical strength but it is very challenging. I still golf and bowl, but as you get up in years, shuffleboard is great. People can shuffle into their 90s."

THE MAYOR

Kerry Kirschner. Married, four children. Moved to Sarasota in 1952 at the age of five. "The changes I've seen have been good and bad. Air conditioning changed all of Florida. I don't think anyone would have lived here without it. When we went to the beach on Longboat Key, we would run as fast as we could down to the water. The mosquitoes were so bad they would carry you away." Retires this month from office of mayor and city commission. "The overriding concern of any elected official should be the protection of the environment. Most people don't move here to be with their families or because of jobs. The environment is the reason. If we lose it, we lose the quality of life, the basis of our community."

THE TEACHER

Carl Stevens. Moved to Sarasota as a girl in 1947. One of five sisters. Has taught school for 38 years. Currently teaches kindergarten at Phillippi Shores Elementary School. Says that the curriculum and teaching methods have improved immeasurably over the years, but the satisfaction remains the same. "At this age, children are so loving, so eager to please and to learn. And when a child is struggling to grasp something and suddenly his face lights up with understanding - it's truly a delight."

THE LAST RINGLING

Pat Ringling Buck. Director of information, the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art. "As a girl I used to visit my Great-aunt Ida Ringling North, who lived on Bird Key, a private estate at the time. I thought it was heaven. Her sons and I would take the boat and coast along Siesta Key, which was nothing but wide beaches and sea oats. You could pull in anywhere." Moved to Sarasota to bring up her children and work as a journalist. "I didn't grow up with a special sense of being a Ringling. My mother was the youngest daughter of Augustus, the second-oldest brother. We lived in Wisconsin and when the circus came to town the Doll family of midgets would come into the audience and sit with me. That was exciting."

THE YOUNG PROFESSIONAL

Deena Frankel. Managing director of the Sarasota French Film Festival. "There's a very different atmosphere here, in believing not only in making something happen in the community, but also in taking responsibility to make it happen. I've seen this here in a way I've never seen before." Marital status: single. "The thing about being single is that you're never sure where your next adventure is going to take you." Away from the office: "Sailing's my passion in life. I also ride horses and own a home in town, so I spend a fair amount of time fussing over it."

THE HOST

Michael Klauber, owner of Michael's on East. "I built Michael's on East to be there a long time and to be the center of Sarasota, catering to the community. There used to be the old Plaza Restaurant downtown where Sarasota met. I wanted to take its place." About his father, Murf, owner of the Colony Beach Resort: "My dad has been an incredible inspiration. His unbelievable enthusiasm and drive have been a great act to follow." What to order? "I consider our rack of lamb a celebration."

THE ACTRESS

Roberta MacDonald. She and her husband Bob Turoff own the Golden Apple Dinner Theater. "The people of Sarasota have been wonderful to us. There are people who have seen every show and that's 194 shows!" Offstage: "We live on five acres east of town. We raise peacocks, swans, burros and I have three dogs and 11 cats. So I have no hobbies." The future? "My husband and I often wonder what's going to happen when we're 70. Will we still be opening shows every six weeks? We can't imagine not being in the theater."
COPYRIGHT 1991 Clubhouse Publishing, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Sarasota Magazine
Date:Mar 1, 1991
Words:960
Previous Article:The top 10 reasons I love Sarasota.
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