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The legacy continues.

In this fast paced high tech world of enhanced communication abilities, scientific understanding, and creature comfort/security, we are youth driven and inspired. Vitality and enthusiasm trump apathy and negativity; however, not all is gained from a total innocent, youthful approach. Many pearls are lost to the sea of antiquity in the post information super-highway.

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There is such an overwhelming amount of information to be gained than is already known that the path of least resistance most commonly taken, is out with the old/in with the new. This is truly a disservice to humanity, forcing us to reinvent the wheel whilst we should be adding to what we already know works, rather than taking away from, in our arrogant efforts to make room for the most modern innovations.

There have been so many advances in the treatment of two of the top killers of Americans, of late, that it appears we're on the right track, yet this follows an extended period of stagnation and regression in the orthodox treatments of heart disease and cancer. In reality there is no stagnation or regression, only progression in our cumulative knowledge of the etiology and effective treatments of the aforementioned in the natural realm.

Heart disease is primarily an epithelial and nutritional condition exacerbated by inflammation, inactivity, and malnutrition. This has been known in an increasing extent for decades; however, the power of the pen in advertising has led us in many misleading directions of over simplification. Pharmaceutical interventions can be a double edged sword, depending copiously on whether the treatment protocol is made by a trained professional or by an eager consumer who has seen a new drug on TV that he'd like to try for a condition that he may have.

Cancer, on the other hand is, and has always been, primarily a disease of aberrant lifestyle and chronic low level inflammation. Currently a common form of lung cancer, for example, may kill you slower than ever before, as touted by televised commercials, yet there have been alternative doctors successfully treating lung cancer reportedly for years through the involvement of holistic methods. This being said, I am not of the opinion that there is a conspiracy to hide "the cure of cancer" for the purpose of big pharmas profit. "The cure" is not that simple nor is it uni-faceted, but old fashioned common sense can still play a big part in the prevention of cancerous occurrence and recurrence.

As a second generation chiropractic internist, and 4th generation chiropractic physician, I've always strived to find out what works for me in my provision of natural health care. I study it, test it, and make sure it works, then add to it and never take away from what has been proven throughout my studies, to be effective. Another protocol I follow, through my own moral code as a professional is, maintaining my humility; I've come to notice that every time I get to thinking haughty of myself, it isn't long before I find that "humble" ingredient of my success.

A line coined by Dr. R. Michael Cessna, alongside being promoted by Dr. Jack Kessinger; one of the founding fathers of the ACA's Council on Diagnosis of Internal Disorders and my father, the original promoter and propagator of Dr. Cessna's program, respectively, "We strive to provide the very best natural health care that science has to offer to all those we have the privilege of serving." Bud Ohlsen, the founder of The Key Company, presented Dad with a plaque that states, "The purpose of the Kessinger Chiropractic and Diagnostic Centre is Saving Lives, Extending Lives and Improving the Quality of Life of the Patients we have the Privilege of Serving." That engraved plaque is on humble, heartfelt display in our waiting room.

by: A. Jay Kessinger IV, DC, ND, DABCI, DACBN
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Author:Kessinger, A. Jay
Publication:Original Internist
Article Type:Column
Date:Jun 1, 2016
Words:640
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