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The legacy continues.

The title of this article--"The Legacy Continues"--often leads me to personal revelations as I compose. This edition will be no different. When beginning to write this article. I often reflect on the title, itself. The word "legacy"' is a noun and Merriam-Webster Online give the second definition as "something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past." This leads into a whole array of potential story lines.

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My heritage is rich. My mother is a Daughter of the American Revolution (DAR); my family has been involved in chiropractic for more than 75 years: and now I'm personally beginning my 21st year of actively practicing chiropractic, just entering the 12th year of partnership with my dad. My life has been, and continues to be, a learning experience. As Mark Twain said. "Even when you're on the right track, you'll get run over, if you just sit still."'

Just like Dr. R.M. Cessna. Dad is innovative and progressive in his practice of chiropractic. He hones his skills physically through his practice and then shares his wisdom didactically and practically with his students. I can't help but think that this really debunks the old cliche, "Those who can't do. teach." He, however, teaches what he does.

When I was a smart-alecky sophomore in high school. I asked him. "How come you call your business a practice? Aren't you ever going to get good at it?" His heartfelt, and near-instant reply was. "Always getting better." That left me with the thought. "Wow! I'm in the practice of life. BUT I'm not a professional because I'm not making any money." Now that I am a professional, the memory of the aforementioned gives me a foundation. I'm not Dad's oldest student, but I have been his student the longest. To paraphrase another Mark Twain quote. "I'm really amazed at how much Dad has learned in these past few years."

Dad and I do a weekly. 30-minute, live radio show, and we welcome phone calls. The name of the show is A Healthy Concept. "Healthy," according to Merriam-Webster Online has several appropriate definitions: 1) enjoying health and vigor of body, mind, or spirit; well; 2) evincing health; and 3) conducive to health. With such a title we always have something interesting and timely to discuss, and the program continues to thrive after more than five years. Like Will Rogers, we obtain much of our material from the daily newspaper and current medical fads. Phone calls and written requests for information often lead our discussions in seemingly new directions; however, by being mindful of our show's title, we can always bring the solution back to the plethora of information at our fingertips and lead the listener in the direction of correction (i.e., normalcy or health).

It never ceases to amaze me that no matter how varied the conditions discussed, the solution is basically always the same. The return to normal physiology leads to the return to health, just as the departure from normal function parallels the departure from health. Of course, before we lose our health, there has to be a depletion of our natural nutrient reserves. The rapidity with which physical health declines is dependent upon personal "galvanization" of the genes and the degree of neglect. Conversely, the amount of time necessary to reacquire and then maintain an individual's optimal health level is usually dependent upon the quality of nutritional support and the degree of personal determination to implement positive lifestyle modifications.

Interference in natural matters always leads to natural disasters (i.e., abnormal physiology results from trauma, infection, and/or malnutrition). Many times a patient's failure to note and understand the deleterious effects of his or her lifestyle choices has long-term detrimental effects. Since it has been recently reported, we now know even central nervous system cells can rejuvenate. This means that there is never a time to give up. There is time to wake up and realize the error of one's ways, and now is better than later. It is our job to provide this wake-up call, to stimulate this desire, to increase the will and drive within our patients to reach toward optimal health. These are the people we have the privilege of serving.

Pain is the most common reason for a patient to seek the care of a physician; however, pain itself is most often not the problem at all. Nonetheless, an industry of pain-relieving medicine thrives, and as a result, increased nutritional deficiencies, leaky gut syndromes, and ultimately increased cases of chronic degenerative disease occur within our populace. This knowledge is the basis for my wisdom in natural health care provision.

by A. Jay Kessinger IV, DC ND
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Author:Kessinger, A. Jay, IV
Publication:Original Internist
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Mar 22, 2006
Words:787
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