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The gold-standard treatment for women with early-stage breast cancer is breast conservation surgery (BCS) rather than mastectomy, but the number of women choosing mastectomy is increasing.

The gold-standard treatment for women with early-stage breast cancer is breast conservation surgery (BCS) rather than mastectomy, but the number of women choosing mastectomy is increasing. Researchers analyzed the National Cancer Data Base records of more than 1.2 million adult women who were treated for early-stage breast cancer between 1998 and 2011. Overall, the number of women who chose mastectomy increased from 34.3% in 1998 to 37.8% in 2011. The increase was largely attributable to a rise in bilateral mastectomy for unilateral, early-stage disease, which increased from 5.4% of mastectomies in 1998 to 29.7% in 2011. Younger women with less invasive disease and smaller tumors were more likely to choose mastectomy over BCS. The authors suggest that women choose bilateral mastectomy due to factors other than disease burden, including physician recommendation to have a mastectomy, and women's concerns about recurrence and desire for symmetry.

The Journal of the American Medical Association Surgery, November 2014

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Title Annotation:SNAP SHOTS
Publication:Women's Health Activist
Date:Jan 1, 2015
Words:159
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