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The effect of various insecticides on parasitoids of Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: nocturidae) on tobacco in South Carolina. (South Carolina Junior Academy Of Sciences Abstracts).

The primary purpose of treating field crops with insecticides is to target and kill harmful insects, thereby preventing crop damage and economic loss. Insecticides are not a practical investment unless they successfully kill more target organisms than would be killed by natural means. In addition to killing harmful insects, insecticides have the potential to kill parasitoids and other beneficial insects in the field crop. This is only a loss to the grower because they parasitize Lepidoptera and other such species, thus preventing a second generation of harmful insects eating the crop and reducing profits. This investigation assesses the rate of parasitism of tobacco budworms collected on tobacco plots treated with insecticides, including Orthene, Tracer, and S-1812, and compares that rate with that of uncontrolled plots to determine if insecticides kill parasitoids that are beneficial to the crops and farmers. Two consecutive years of results support the hypothesis that untreated plots have the least successful rate of parasitism.
Poppy Markwell
South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics
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Title Annotation:agriculture industry research
Author:Markwell, Poppy
Publication:Bulletin of the South Carolina Academy of Science
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1U5SC
Date:Jan 1, 2003
Words:167
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