Printer Friendly

The changing labor force.

The Changing Labor Force

The labor force will look very different in 2000 than in 1986.

People under 25 will have a smaller share.

People 55 and over will have a smaller share.

Women will have a larger share.

Blacks will have a larger share.

Asians and others will have a larger share.

Hispanics will have a larger share.

Table: The labor force-- jobholders and jobseekers-- will continue to grow, rising 21 million, from 1986 to 2000.

Labor force

Table: The rate of growth-- 18 percent-- will be slower than during the previous 14 years.

Labor force growth

Growth will slow largely because population growth has slowed.

Table: Younger and older workers will become a smaller part of the labor force.

Share of the labor force by age

The share of workers . . .

. . . 16 to 24 years of age will decline because the population of their age group will decline.

. . . 25 to 54--which includes the large baby-boom generation--will increase.

. . . 55 and over will decline because their labor force participation rate will continue to decline, even though the population of their age group will increase.

Table: Women will continue to increase their share of the labor force.

Share of the labor force by sex

The number of women in the labor force will rise from 52 million to 66 million.

The number of women will rise twice as fast as the number of men because the proportion of women who participate in the labor force--especially women 25 to 54 years of age--will continue to rise.

Table: The proportion of whites in the labor force will decrease; the proportion of blacks and of Asians and others will increase.

Share of the labor force by race

Table: Asians and others will have the fastest percentage growth between 1986 and 2000, although their numerical growth will be small.

Percent growth

Numerical growth

Blacks will grow faster than whites because of higher birth rates.

Asians and others will grow faster than whites because of immigration and higher birth rates.

Table: The Hispanic labor force will grow very rapidly.

Labor force growth, 1986-2000

The Hispanic labor force will rise from 8 million in 1986 to 14 million in 2000.

Growth will occur because of immigration and the rise in the native-born Hispanic population.

As a result of this very rapid growth, the Hispanic share of the labor force will increase from 7 percent in 1986 to 10 percent in 2000.

Table: Like the labor force, employment will continue to grow, although more slowly than in the recent past.

Employment

Employment will increase by 21 million, a rise of 19 percent.

Almost all of the employment growth will be in wage and salary jobs.

Between 1972 and 1986, employment growth was bigger numerically (27 million) and showed a larger percentage increase (32 percent) than is projected for 1986-2000.
COPYRIGHT 1987 U.S. Government Printing Office
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1987 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Projections 2000
Publication:Occupational Outlook Quarterly
Date:Sep 22, 1987
Words:470
Previous Article:Projections 2000.
Next Article:The changing demand for goods and services.
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters