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The Staff of Life and Substance of Rebirth.

WAIT-DON'T THROW THAT BREAD AWAY! You might as well sell your soul if you're pitching stale bread. It's the staple of every kitchen and cornerstone of far too many recipes to be neglected after its supple interior has stiffened. Binding, thickening, coating, stuffing, dusting, filling; no matter the need, stale bread is no loaf.

Stale bread is perhaps a thing of contemporary times, regarded and consumed with a different type of reverence in centuries past; the days of shelves filled with deteriorating loaves are recent. Bread was once highly coveted. French peasants of the old school would make the sign of the cross over fresh loaves before breaking and eating it. Bread has long been a symbol of religion and a holy sacrament; the word Bethlehem itself translates into "the house of bread." Not only was the act of receiving bread venerated, but the act of making it a highly guarded craft. Years of training were required and certain rules, even laws enforced. Bread, was permitted to be made only with those grains deemed suitable in order to preserve the quality of the bread and "to avoid wasting so precious a commodity as flour" (Toussant-Samat 237). During the reign of Philippe II of France in the 1200s, bakers were permitted to have their own ovens, freeing them from the schedules of the public ovens. Though the safety of such an inc rease in private ovens was not monitored, restrictions on type of flour and method of preparation continued to be strictly regulated. There was a "legal standard" to be followed. Any baker, who did not adhere to the king's bread policy, was fined heavily. As guilds emerged throughout the thirteenth century among different food artisans, bread bakers formed their own clique. Before a baker could consider himself a "master" or set up shop, he had to acquire a certificate of skill from his peers. Once in business, the baker relied on a tier of servants to run his bakery. At the bottom were the apprentices; they paid a stipend to work for the baker. It was their job to haul the flour, stoke the fire, clean, cook, and most importantly, knead the dough. Higher on the totem pole were the valets soudoyes or paid servants. They shaped the dough loaves and managed production. They did not work for any other master.

It was perhaps during the Industrial Revolution that bread lost much of its character; changing from a product of the communal hearth to a product of mass production. The mechanical era replaced hand made loaves with chemically enhanced breads, uniform in every way and totally uninteresting. After the Industrial and World War eras, a sentiment to return to artisanal products grew. Peter Reinhart suggests in Crust & Crumb (Ten Speed Press 1998) this shift came about in part, due to the grass root subculture of the 1960s and the ensuing health movement of the 70s, and 80s. But, the opening of the bakeries like the Seattle, Washinton based The Little Bread Company and the Berkely, california based Acme Bread Company in 1983 marked a significant return to the craft of artisan breads in America. Restaurants like Chez Panisse supported this movement by featuring classic European breads of local bakeries. To achieve full awareness of the value of quality bread, Reinhart explains that an appreciation of "whole grain s, traditional methodologies, and neotraditional creativity" is necessary. The formation of The Bread Bakers Guild of America in 1993 has brought the baking industry full circle providing educational, research, and certification programs, similar to the days when working with flour, water, and yeast was a skill to be nurtured.

Yet, the large production of today's bakeries cannot be ignored, and they leave us with more than our fill. The result-unwanted, stiff loaves, often cast out, occasionally re-employed. Breadcrumbs are, of course, used the world over and recipes for bread pudding, bread coating, bread sauces, etc., abound. Rather than discard day old bread, let us exploit the merits of giving bread new life. In medieval times it was a common practice to use a hollowed-out loaf as the container for a sweet or savory dish or as the primary thickening agent next to almonds (Davidson 103). Country cooking of the Mediterranean relied on breadcrumbs to help form an emulsion base for a cold sauce, also known as a rouille. In the south of France, a rouille is often made with the addition of spicy chilies, garlic, and fish stock. A French persillade, a thick paste of parsley and garlic, would not be complete without breadcrumbs. Italians too, are notorious users of day old bread, employing it in dumplings, sauces, soups, salads, and d esserts. The peverada sauce of northern Italy combines ground stale bread, bone marrow, grated cheese, black pepper and oil. The famed panzanella bread salads of Tuscany would be lost without their share of bread cubes soaked with vinaigrette. Zuppe, soups thickened with the addition of breadcrumbs are also mainstays of an Italian diet. Likewise, in Spain, both white and red gazpacho benefit from a handful of breadcrumbs. The United Kingdom owes its few culinary contributions, bread puddings and bangers to stale bread. Central and Eastern Europe's cuisines would be remiss without grated crumbs for their schnitzels, matzos, and strudels. After a lengthy history and universal appeal, not to mention the millions of devoted bakers who have toiled to perfect the crumb, it seems a sin to throw away this sacred, nourishing staple.

From her hillside retreat atop the Silverado Trail, Cindy Pawlcyn, Pablo Jacinto, and her four dogs maneuver the 500 square foot kitchen in preparation of breads reincarnate. Picture windows on each twenty foot wa1l of her dining room look onto the valley. At the foot of their property, 500 fruit trees blossom, providing Pawlcyn's husband Murdo with figs, peaches, pears, Plums, pomegranates, quince, and the like for his hard cider. At work, in her home, and in her travels, Pawlcyn forever surrounds herself with good food.

She began like most, at the apron strings of her mother. Encouraged and curious, she ventured beyond the home kitchen and went to work for a caterer in her native Minnesota. She later continued her formal education at the University of Wisconsin-Stout earning a Bachelors Degree in restaurant management and polished her culinary skills at La Varenne and Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. When she returned to the States in her early twenties, she accepted a sous chef position at Chicago's Pump Room. "I worked with a great Spanish chef in Chicago," Pawlcyn recalls. "He was well versed in Nouvelle French cuisine and at the same time ran a classical kitchen; very technicque oriented and a determined taskmaster. He taught me more than you will ever know." Though Pawlcyn's stint in the windy city was brief, it left a lasting impression, and it was here that she met her future Real Restaurant partners. In l980 The Restaurant at Meadowood in Napa Valley, California lured her to the West Coast. Beginning in the fledgling Napa V alley community), Pawlcyn soon became known for relaxed dining with style; it would become her legacy to the American food scene. "The Valley was very small at that time, 120 wineries (today there are 230)," Pawlcyn reflects. "It was a chefs heaven: great produce, great wine, and people who enjoyed learning about both. But, there was no white table cloth-casual dining." The creation of Mustard's Grill in 1983 solidified her role in the country's emerging culinary identity. Pawlcyn quickly assumed a reputation for providing a menu worthy of the maturing wine world in America. Not long after, Pawlcyn and Real Restaurants blazed a trail along the northern California coast, planting food depots in and around the Bay area; Fog City Dinner, Buckeye Roadhouse, Bix, and Roti were among a few of the dozen or so establishments. For Pawlcvn, developing one's palate by traveling and tasting the cuisines of regional America is not only important, but the only way to truly understand flavor. In Becoming a Chef (Van Nostran d Reinhold) she asks, "How many people have eaten lobster in Maine, or stone crab claws in Florida, or lamb in New Zealand?" With dishes like, triple clam chowder, New York Steak with Jack Daniel's Sauce, Macaroni and Cheese du Jour, and truffle French Fries, a night out at 'The Diner' takes on new meaning. Pawlcyn's flair for unforgettable flavors and chic, comfortable dining have helped America define its food culture.

At one point in her career, Pawlcyn was managing over one dozen restaurants. Rather than add to the expanding collection of restaurants, she decided to let some go. In 2000 Pawlcyn bowed out of her partnership with Real Restaurants. "I left the company wanting more freedom to have more time to cook," she confides. Today Pawlcyn is the sole proprietor of Mustard's Grill and Miramonte, her newest solo venture in neighboring St. Helena, California. Teamed with culinary veteran Pablo Jacinto, who heads the opening kitchen staff, the restaurant features foods of the Amercias.

At 40-something years old, he is one of the most inspired visionaries of his generation. In addition to an adept hand, he has the culinary mind of an Einstein, often contemplating the specifics of a dish right down to the root, soil, and feed of each ingredient. For years, young cooks have weathered his exacting techniques in the kitchen to rise above their professional peers. In return, they flourished. After nine years Boulcy closed his doors in 1996, sending his proteges on their way and into their own spotlight the likes of which include: Rocco PiSpirito of Union Pacific in New York, Craig Shelton of The Ryland Inn, Eric Ripert of Le Bernardin, and Eric Blauberg of '21' Club; the list goes on.

Fond of cooking as a young boy, his childhood in New York afforded him the opportunity to dine in and become well accustomed to the Manhattan restaurant scene.

Unlike most pastry chefs, Florian Bellanger learned his patisserie style from the hot line. Perhaps this sounds a little alarming to some, but his expertise in the area of high-end patisserie is filled with wisdom, "1 think in pastry, we have plenty to learn from cooks. They have a spontaneous way of making dishes and many of their products are cooked a la minute; they have to expose their talent all night long," he confides. "It amazed me when I first started working in restaurants. I observed them and tried do things their way, that's how I came up with the ideas I have today." He points out that in boutique pastry shops, there are many pre-made, frozen preparations. To change this, Bellanger's base preparations and mise en place are well organized for service, allowing him to operate the pastry station, like a hot line. "Many components are made a la minute, or 10 minutes before," Bellanger explains. "Brown butter sauce, rum caramel sauce, and cremes, can be really wonderful that way. You lose something-- you lose flavor and texture, when you make it ahead of time." Though a source of curiosity for Bellanger he has no plans to abandon his post for the hot line, "It's too hot I don't like to sweat," Bellanger laughs.

The hot line may have inspired him, but pastries have preoccupied Bellanger since the age of 10 when he took to baking after school. By the age of 16 Bellanger attended L'Ecole de Paris des Metier de la Table, graduating with a specialty in pastry The following year he attended the school's inaugural chocolate and ice cream program, the first of its kind in France. After his obligatory military service in French Guyana he returned to France to start his career at La Maison du Chocolat, a renowned chocolate shop in Paris. He cherished his three year stint, reflecting on their highly protected recipes and techniques. "When I went to work at La Maison du Chocolat, it was as if I had never made chocolate before; it was a revelation for me," he confides. It also grabbed the attention of pastry guru Pierre Herme, who was just beginning to receive recognition for his innovative pastry work at the chic Parisian gourmet store, Fauchon. It was the first time. Bellanger was exposed to the creative side of patisserie. A fter several years he was named Executive Pastry Chef of the Fauchon outlet in Qatar, a tiny country in the Persian Gulf, where he remained for three years. Bellanger knew, in order to grow he would have to leave the Fauchon family. After traveling and working for some of the most noted palates in the world, Bellanger was recruited by the Le Bernardin team in 1996 and couldn't pass up the opportunity to live and work in New York City.

When creating a new dessert menu, Bellanger focuses on the style of Le Bernardin, "The cooking of Eric Ripert is very light and flavorful. We follow the same ideas; we work for the product. I think it's okay to have two or three flavors on the plate, but you always have to focus on your main flavor. The ingredient comes first, then the chef. If the ingredient makes you famous, then so be it." Bellanger recently received a nod from the James Beard Foundation as one of its nominees for Pastry Chef of the Year 2001. Though, true to his own words, he accepts the nomination as the highest of compliments, but replies, "This is like a miracle for me. You know, I came here five years ago; I didn't know anyting--I mean I knew my job, but I had no contacts. And, this year the awards came up. What's the most important I think for me is the fact that the nomination is made by the profession and that feels good. I don't think about it, because if you think, you convince yourself that you're good, and if you convince your self that you're good, you don't work at it anymore. Be happy when you do something well, but don't be proud of yourself-let your wife or your parents be proud of you."

Though raised with an international palate, his fondest memories are those of his grandparents' farm in Rhode Island. After graduating from Cornell University, Bouley departed for France to work in the kitchens of such culinary icons as Fredy Giradet, Paul Bocuse, and Joel Robuchon. In their kitchens he learned that the greatest dishes are the simplest and require pronounced skill and knowledge. Upon his return to New York, he traveled through the American circuit of culinary movers and shakers. His resume includes kitchen posts at La Cote Basque, Le Perigord, Le Cirque, and Montrachet.

In 1987, he opened his own venture, Bouley and quickly received the praise of critics for his simple but elegant creations cooked with little butter or cream. In 1996 the restaurant closed, giving Bouley a year to prepare for his future venture, Bouley Bakery. The humble restaurant, with a hearth of a kitchen, was a reminder of its owner's undeniable skill in the kitchen, even with bread. After three years, Bouley was ready to tackle two cuisines more readily associated with goulash than gourmet in his restaurant Danube. The combination of Austrian and Hungarian dishes materializes like all great cuisine; its elegance rooted in exalting the subtle nuances that nature has provided.

Baked Ribollita, Red Wine-Onion, and Zucchini-Tomato Bread Soups

ingredients

For the red wine-onion bread soup:

1/3 cup olive oil

3 pounds sweet Maui onions, peeled and sliced into wedges [*]

2 red onions peeled and sliced.

4 shallots, peeled and sliced

10 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced

3 cups red wine

4 cups veal stock

4 cups chicken stock

12 slices day-old pugliese bread [**]

1/2 cup Fontina Val d'Aosta cheese, finely grated

1/2 cup antique Gruyere cheese, finely grated [***]

1/2 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese, finely grated

Salt and pepper to taste

For the ribollita:

2 cups dry cannelloni beans, soaked overnight

Peel of 1 lemon

1 bay leaf

1 onion, peeled and halved

4 cloves

3 tablespoons plus 1/4 cup olive oil

2 cups chopped scallions

3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced

4 cups chopped green chard

2 pounds tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and diced

2 tablespoons minced parsley

2 tablespoons minced basil

12 slices day-old levain bread [**]

Sea salt and pepper to taste

For the zucchini-tomato bread soup:

12 slices day-old ciabatta bread [**]

1/4 cup olive oil

2 1/2 pounds zucchini, diced

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

3 tablespoons minced parsley

4 cups vegetable stock

1 3/4 pounds tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and diced, reserving all juices

2 tab1espoons chopped mint leaves

1 tablespoon lemon zest

Sea salt and pepper to taste

(*.) Available through The Chef's Garden at (800) 289-4644.

(**.) These rustic loaves are made in regional bakeries throughout Europe. Levain is a specialty sourdough loaf. Available in specialty bread bakeries.

(***.) Antique Gruyere is also known as cave aged Gruyere and has a nutty flavor. Available through Murray's Cheese Shop at (212) 243-3289.

Note: Ribollita is a hearty Tuscan soup meaning "twice baked" in Italian. Traditionally, leftover vegetables, stale bread, and cooked beans are combined and baked in a casserole.

directions

For the red wine-onion bread soup, preheat the oven to 375.

In a large saucepan, heat 2 1/2 ounces of the oil over low heat. Add the Maui onions, red onions, shallots, and garlic and saute until very tender, about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about 10 minutes. Add the veal stock and chicken stock and simmer until reduced by one-quarter, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, season, and set aside keeping warm. Place the bread slices on a parchment-lined sheet pan and brush with the remaining olive oil. Season and place in the oven until toasted, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. Place six soup crocks on a sheet pan and ladle some soup into each. Set a piece of bread in the center and top with more soup. Set a piece of bread in the center and sprinkle with cheeses. Place in the oven to bake for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

For the ribollita, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a medium saucepan, cover the cannelloni beans, lemon, bay leaf, onion halves, and cloves with water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender, about one hour. Remove from the heat, strain through a fine mesh sieve, reserving the beans and liquid separately and discard the aromatics. In a large saucepan, heat three tablespoons of the oil over medium heat and saute the scallions and garlic until browned, about 10 minutes. Add the chard and saute until wilted, about two minutes. A the tomatoes and saute until soft, about three minute-"" beans, reserved cooking liquid, parsl" "" until warmed through. Remove from the heat, season, and set aside. Arrange six terracotta dishes on a sheet pan and fill each with ribollita. Set two slices of bread on top and drizzle with the remaining olive oil. Place in the oven to bake until golden brown, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

For the zucchini-tomato bread soup, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the bread slices on a parchment-lined sheet pan, drizzle with two tablespoons of the olive oil, season, and place in the oven until golden brown, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. In a large saucepan, heat the remaining oil over medium heat and saute the zucchini, garlic, and parsley until golden brown, about five minutes. Add the tomatoes and saute until tender, about two minutes. Add the tomato juice and vegetable stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, add the bread, and simmer until warmed through, about five minutes. Remove from the heat, add the mint and lemon, season, and set aside keeping warm.

To finish the red wine-onion bread soup, preheat the broiler to 500 degrees. Place the soup crocks under the broiler until golden brown about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, spoon some zucchini-tomato bread soup into a soup bowl and accompany with ribollita and red wine-onion bread soup.

Ox Tongue and Ciabatta Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette and Parsley Sauce

cindy pawlcyn

ingredients

For the ox tongue:

1 beer tongue

2 quarts veal stock

2-inch ginger, thinly sliced

1 onion, peeled and sliced

1 carrot, peeled and sliced

2 stalks celery, sliced

6 cloves garlic peeled

3 sprigs thyme

3 sprigs savory

3 sprigs parsley

1 tablespoon black peppercorns

2 tablespoons coriander seeds

1 tablespoon allspice

Sea salt to taste

For the mustard vinaigrette:

1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed

1 small shallot, peeled and minced

1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

Juice of 1 lemon

1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

Sea salt and pepper to taste

For the parsley sauce:

1/4 bunch curly parsley, stemmed and chopped

1/4 bunch flat leaf parsley, stemmed and chopped

1/4 bunch mint, stemmed and chopped

5 sprigs dill, stemmed and chopped

5 sprigs tarragon, stemmed and chopped

3 anchovy fillets, finely chopped

6 cloves uarlic, peeled and minced

2 tablespoons capers, chopped

1 1/2 cups extra virgin olive oil

Sea salt and crushed slack pepper to taste

For the ciabatta:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 loaf day-old levain bread, crust removed and diced small

Salt and pepper to taste

For the salad:

Wild arugula

Scallions minced

Capers

Salt and cracked black pepper to taste

For the garnish:

Mache flowers

Arugula blossoms

Note: Levain bread is made from a bread starter based on wild yeast and typically has a thick crust. The inside of the bread has a slightly shiny interior with large holes and a creamy taste.

For the ox tongue, in a large saucepan over medium heat, bring all of the ingredients to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender, about two hours, skimming the top occasionally. Remove from the heat, strain, and transfer the ox tongue to a cutting board to cool. Remove and discard the outer skin from the tongue. Cut into thin slices and set aside.

directions

For the mustard vinaigrette, in the bowl of a food processor, combine the garlic, shallot, mustard, lemon juice and vinegar and pulse to combine, about one minute, With the motor running, slowly add the olive oil in a thin, steady stream and puree until well combined. Transfer to a bowl, season, and reserve.

For the parsley sauce, in a medium bowl, combine the curly parsley, flat leaf parsley, mint, dill, tarragon, anchovies, garlic, and capers and whisk to combine. Add the olive oil and whisk to combine. Season and set aside.

For the ciabatta, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, toss the olive oil bread to coat and season. Arrange the ciabatta on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Place in to bake until golden brown, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

For the salad, in a medium bowl, combine, all of the ingredients and toss to combine. Add some mustard vinaigrette and toss to combine. Season set aside.

To serve, spoon some salad into a salad plate and arrange some ox tongue and ciabatta on top. Drizzle some parsley sauce over the dish and garnish with mache flowers and arugula blossoms.

Olive Bread Salad Nicoise

ingredients

cindy pawlcyn

For the croutons:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 small loaf day-old black olive bread, crust removed and diced

Salt and pepper to taste

For the salad:

6 anchovy fillets

2 tablespoons capers

1 cup oil cured black olives, pitted and chopped

1 cup wild baby arugula

1/4 bunch chives, chopped

2 red bell peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded, and sliced into thin strips

2 tablespoons olive oil

Salt and pepper to taste

For the dish:

6 slices Pastures of Eden French feta cheese [*]

3 eggs, hard boiled and quartered

Ground black pepper

(*.) French feta is a very mild, creamy variety of feta cheese. Available through Arthur Schuman Inc. at (973) 227-0030.

directions

For the croutons, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the olive oil and bread and toss to coat. Transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Place in the oven until golden brown, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the salad, in a medium bowl, combine the anchovy fillets, capers, olives, arugula, chives, peppers, croutons, and olive oil. Toss to combine, season, and set aside.

To serve, place a slice of feta cheese in the center of a plate and arrange some salad and hard-boiled eggs on top and sprinkle the dish with black pepper.

Herb Cured Salmon with Brioche French Toast

ingredients

cindy pawlcyn

For the salmon:

2 pounds king salmon, skin on and boned

2 juniper berries, crushed

1/2 cup kosher salt

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

2 sprigs dill, stemmed

2 sprigs tarragon, stemmed

For the goat cheese:

1 cup fresh goat cheese

3 tablespoons heavy cream

1/2 cup creme fraiche

Black pepper to taste

For the brioche French toast:

3 eggs

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

12 slices day old-brioche bread

Sea salt and pepper to taste

For the garnish:

Chopped chives

Ground black pepper

directions

For the salmon, place the salmon on a cheesecloth-lined sheet pan. Sprinkle the salmon with juniper berries, pressing lightly to adhere. In a medium bowl, combine the salt, sugar, pepper, and allspice. Liberally coat the salmon on both sides with the spice mix, dill, and tarragon. Tightly wrap in the cheesecloth and transfer to a deep pan. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in the refrigerator for 36 hours. Unwrap the salmon and gently wipe off the salt and herb coating. Transfer to a cutting board, cut the salmon into thin slices, and reserve keeping chilled.

For the goat cheese, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine all of the ingredients and mix on low speed to combine. Season and set aside.

For the brioche French toast, in a medium bowl, combine the eggs, cream, and mustard. Season and whisk to combine. In a medium saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Dip the brioche slices into the egg mixture until soaked. Place the bread in the saute pan and saute on both sides until golden brown. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, place two slices of French toast in the center of a plate, set some salmon and a quenelle of the goat cheese on top, and garnish with chives and black pepper.

Smoked Pork Chop with Corn Bread Pudding and Pea Shoots

cindy pawlcyn

Ingredients

1/2 cup unsalted butter

For the cider sauce:

3 cups hard cider, reduced by half

4 cups chicken stock

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons minced thyme

1 1/2 tablespoons minced parsley

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Salt and pepper to taste

For the cornbread pudding:

1 red onion, peeled and minced

2 stalks celery, minced

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

4 eggs

1 1/2 cups heavy cream

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons minced sage

6 cups diced day-old cornbread

Salt and pepper to taste

For the pea shoots:

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 clove garlic, peeled and chopped

2 shallots, peeled and chopped

3 bunches pea shoots Salt and pepper to taste

For the pork chops:

6 10-ounce center cut applewood smoked pork chops [*]

Salt and pepper to taste

(*.) Available through Hobbs Applewood Smoked Meat Co. at (415) 453-0577.

directions

For the cider sauce, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the cider and chicken stock to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer until reduced by one-third, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, add the butter, thyme, and parsley and whisk to combine. Season and set aside keeping warm.

For the cornbread pudding, preheat the oven to 350 degrees, coat the inside of a deep ovenproof pan with some of the and set aside. In a medium saute pan, melt the remaining butter over medium heat. Add the red bell pepper, onion, celery, and garlic and saute until tender, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, heavy cream, salt, pepper, and mustard, Add the vegetables, sage, and cornbread and toss well to combine. Season and transfer to the prepared pan, place in the oven to bake until set, about 25 minutes. Remove from the heat, cut into squares, and set aside keeping warm.

For the pea shoots, in a medium saute pan, heat the oil and butter over medium heat. Add the garlic and shallots and saute until translucent. Add the pea shoots and saute until tender, about three minutes. Remove from the heat, season, and set aside keeping warm.

For the pork chops, prepare a hot grill. Season and sear the pork chops until desired doneness. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, place a pork chop, some pea shoots, and cornbread pudding in the center of a plate and spoon some sauce around the dish.

Bread and Morel Sausage with Japanese Mustard Greens

cindy pawlcyn

ingredients

For the bread and morel sausages:

2 pounds pork butt

1 pound boneless chicken

1/4 pound pork fat

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

3 tablespoons chopped basil

1 head garlic, roasted and peeled

1 onion, peeled and chopped

1 tablespoon black mustard seeds, toasted

1 tablespoon yellow mustard seeds, toasted

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

2 cups morel mushrooms, minced

1 1/2 cups diced day-old baguette

2 1/2 feet pork casings

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Sea salt and pepper to taste

For the blanching liquid:

4 cups water

1 cup white wine

1 onion, peeled and chopped

4 cloves garlic, peeled

3 bay leaves

3 sprigs parsley

1 teaspoon sea salt

For the mustard sauce:

2 cups brown pork stock

1 tablespoon whole grain mustard

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Salt and pepper to taste

For the pea shoots:

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 shallots, peeled and minced

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

4 cups Japanese red mustard greens

Salt and pepper to taste

directions

For the breadcrumbs:

3 tablespoons butter

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 cup breadcrumbs

1/2 cup freshly grated horseradish

1/4 cup minced parsley

1 teaspoon minced garlic

Salt and pepper to taste

For the bread and morel sausages, in a medium bowl, combine the pork butt, chicken, pork fat, parsley, basil ,garlic, and onion. Transfer to a meat grinder fitted with the medium die attachment and grind into a large bowl. Add the mustard seeds, fennel seeds, mushrooms, and bread and toss to combine. Transfer to a sausage stuffer fitted with a medium nozzle. Place the pork casings over the nozzle and fill with bread and morel filling, tying off in four-inch intervals. Transfer the prepared sausages to a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside. In a large saucepan over medium heat, bring the water, wine, onion, garlic, bay leaves, parsley, and sea salt to a boil, reduce the beat, and maintain at a simmer. Add the sausages and simmer until the internal temperature reaches 140 degrees, about 10 minutes. Remove from, the heat, strain, and reserve the sausages keeping warm.

For the mustard sauce, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the pork stock to a boil. Reduce and simmer until reduced by half, about 20 minutes. Add the whole grain and Dijon mustards, and butter whi to combine. Simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat, season, and set aside keeping warm.

For the pea shoots, in a medium saute pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and garlic and saute until translucent. Add the greens and saute until wilted, about two minutes. Remove from the beat, season, and set aside keeping warm.

For the breadcrumbs, in a medium saute pan, heat the butter and the oil over medium heat. Add the breadcrumbs and saute until golden brown, about three minutes. Remove from the heat, add the horseradish, parsley, and garlic, and toss to combine. Season and set aside keeping warm.

To finish the sausages, in a medium saute pan, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the sausages and sear until golden brown. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, arrange some greens in the center of a plate, set a sausage in the center, sprinkle with breadcrumbs, and drizzle some mustard sauce over the dish.

Red Cherry and Apricot Brioche Bread Pudding

cindy pawlcyn

ingredients

For the bread pudding:

3 cups whole milk

1 vanilla bean, split and scraped

10 egg yolks

1 cup granulated sugar

6 cups diced day-old brioche

1/2 cup dried cherries

1/2 cup dried apricots

For the caramel:

1 3/4 cups sweetened condensed milk

1/3 cup dark rum

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup heavy cream

For the whipped cream:

1 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup confectioners' sugar

For the dish:

Sliced almonds, toasted

directions

For the bread pudding, preheat the oven to 350 degrees and place six 6-ounce ramekins in a roasting pan. In a medium saucepan, bring the milk and vanilla scrapings to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the egg yolks and sugar and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and add the remaining cream. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled. Add the bread, cherries, and apricots and set aside for five minutes. Spoon the mixture into the prepared ramekins. Pour enough hot water to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins, cover with aluminum foil, and place in the oven to bake until set, about 25 minutes. Remove the foil and bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the caramel, preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Place the condensed milk in an ovenproof dish, cover with aluminum foil, and set inside a roasting pan. Pour enough water in the pan to come halfway up the sides of the dish. Place in the oven and hake for one hour or until thick and golden brown, about 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. Add the rum, vanilla, and salt and whisk to combine. Transfer to a medium saucepan over medium heat, add the heavy cream, and bring to a simmer. Maintain the heat until warmed. Remove from the heat and set aside keeping warm.

For the whipped cream, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the heavy cream and sugar to form soft peaks, about three minutes. Transfer to a bowl and set aside keeping chilled.

To serve, transfer a bread pudding mold onto the centerof the plate and remove the ramekin. Spoon some caramel and whipped cream over the dish and sprinlde with almons.

Pain Perdue with Lavender Honey Ice Cream

florian bellanger

ingredients

For the ice cream:

9 ounces whole milk

1 1/2 ounces heavy cream

2 ounces lavender honey

1/2 ounce granulated sugar

2 egg yolks

For the berries:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1 pint strawberries, hulled and quartered

1 pint blueberries

1 pint raspberries

Juice of l lemon

For the pain perdue:

10 1/2 ounces whole milk

10 1/2 ounces heavy cream

1 vanilla bean, split and scraped

5 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

4 egg yolks

1 ounce unsalted butter

12 day-old French baguette slices

For the dish:

Lavender honey

directions

For the ice cream, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the milk, cream, anti honey to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the temper yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon, remove from the heat and strain through a fine mesh sieve. Set aside in an ice bath until chilled and freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions.

For the berries, in a medium saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the sugar and simmer until dissolved, about one minute. Add the strawberries, toss to coat, and saute for one minute. Add the blueberries and raspberries, toss to coat, anti saute for one minute. Add the lemon juice, stir to combine, and saute for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the pain perdue, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the milk, cream, and vanilla bean to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine half of the sugar and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolks, adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Add the remaining cream and set aside to cool. In a medium saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Dip the bread to soak well. Place the bread in the saute pan and sear on both sides until golden brown, about two minutes, turning once. Remove from the heat, place on a parchment-lined sheet pan, sprinkle with the remaining sugar, and set aside.

To serve, place two pain perdue slices in the center of a p late and spoon some berries and ice cream over the dish and drizzle with the lavender honey.

Fried Pears with Poire William Sorbet

florian bellanger

ingredients

For the sorbet:

1/2 cup dried pears

1/3 cup plus 1 ounce Poire William [*]

2 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

2 1/2 ounces water

17 1/2 ounces per puree

For the sauce:

3 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

7 ounces heavy cream

1 ounce Frangelico[R] liqueur

1 1/2 ounces milk chocolate, chopped

For the pears:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

3 eggs

4 cups bread crumbs

2 pears, cored and cut into 6 segments

1/4 cup vegetable oil

(*.) Poire William is the clear distillate of Switzerland made from pears.

directions

For the sorbet, in a small bowl, combine the dried pears and 1/3 cup of the Poire William and set aside overnight. Transfer the pears to a cutting board, dice, and set aside. Place the pear puree in a medium bowl. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar and water. Bring to a boil, remove from a medium bowl. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar and water. Bring to a Boil, remove from the heat, and pour over the pear puree. Whisk to combine, strain through a fine mesh sieve, add the pears, and the remaining Poire William. Freeze in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions.

For the sauce, in a small covered saucepan, bring the sugar to a boil and simmer until golden brown, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and slowly add the cream, whisking constantly. Return to medium heat and simmer until smooth. Remove from the heat and add the Frangelico and chocolate. Stir to incorporate and set aside.

For the pears, place the flour, eggs, and brcadcrumbs in three separate bowls and lightly beat the eggs. Coat the pears in the flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs and place on a parchment-lined sheet pan. In a medium saute pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the pears and saute until golden brown, about two minutes. Remove from the heat, place on a paper towel-lined sheet pan to drain, and set aside.

To serve, spoon some sauce in the center of a soup bowl, set a scoop of sorbet in the center, and place two pears to the side.

Baked Airport Charlotte with Marzipan Ice Cream

florian bellenger

ingredients

For the ice cream:

2 1/2 cup whole milk

2 ounces heavy cream

1 ounce corn syrup

2 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

4 1/2 ounces marzipain, 60% almonds

For the apricotsL

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 pounds apricots pitted and halved

2 ounces honey

For the vanilla bavarois:

17 1/2 ounces whole milk

2 vanilla beans, split and scraped

4 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

5 egg yolks

5 sheets gelatin, soaked in 5 cups cold water

17 1/2 ounces heavy cream whipped to soft peaks

For the bread:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

30 2x2 1/2 inch squares day old white bread

For the apricol sauce

3 1/2 ounces apricol puree

1 ounce granulated sugar

For the dish:

Loasted pistachios

For the ice cream, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the milk cream corn syrup to a boil. Remove the heat and set aside to cool slightly. Place the marzpan in the bowl of the food processor or fitted with the metal blade attachment and pulse to form small pieces. Slowly add the milk mixture and puree until smooth. Set aside an ice bath until chilled and freeze in an ice cream machine according to the manufacturers instructions.

For the apricots preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium over proof dish spread the butter along the bottom. Place the apricots in a single layer and drizzle with the honey. Place in the oven until tender, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

For the vanilla bavarois, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, brings the milk and vanilla bean scrapings to a boil. Reduce the heat and maintain at a summer. In a medium bowl, combine the sugar and egg yolks and whisk until smooth. Temper the egg yolk adding one-third of the hot cream while whisking constantly. Whisk the tempered yolks into the hot cream and place over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. When the mixture thickens enough to coat the back on the spoon, add the gelatin and simmer until melted, about one minute. Remove from the heat and set aside in an ice bath until cooled. Fold in the whipped cream, transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip and set aside keeping cool.

For the bread, in a medium saute pan melt the butter medium heat. Add the bread and saute until browned about two minutes, turning once. Remove from the heat place on a parchment lined sheet pan and set aside.

For the apricot sauce in a small bowl, whisk together the apricot of puree and sugar and set aside.

To assemble arrange six 3 inch round ring molds on a parchment lined sheet pan Arrange the bread slices on the inside of the molds. Pipe some of the bavarois into each mold and set aside in the refrigerator until set about 20 minutes. Arrange some apricots on top and set aside keeping cool.

To serve, place a charlotte in the center of the plate, remove the ring mold and arrange some pistachios on top. Please a scoop of the marzipan ice cream next to the charlotte and drizzle some sauce around the dish.

Beef Shoulder with Brioche Dumplings and Fresh Horseradish

david bouley

ingredients

For the brioche dumplings:

12 3-inch veal bones with marrow

12 1/2 ounccs diced day-old brioche, crust removed

5 eggs, beaten

1/2 cup unsalted butter

1/4 bunch parsley, stemmed and chopped

2 cups chicken stock

2 cups beef stock

Salt, pepper, and nutmeg to taste

For the beef shoulder:

10 pounds tri-tip steak, trimmed

13 3-inch veal bones with marrow

2 onions, peeled, halved, and charred

1 turnip, peeled

2 stalks elecry

1 small celeriac, peeled

1 tablespoon juniper berries

1 teaspoon whole allspice

1 bay leaf, halved

2 sprigs thyme

1 bunch baby carrots, peeled

1 bunch baby turnips, peeled

1 bunch baby leeks

1 clove garlic, peeled

1/2 bunch lovage leaves, chopped

For the apple horseradish sauce:

3 1/2 pounds Golden Delicious apples, peeled, cored, and grated, peels reserved separately

1 small cinnamon stick

1 clove

6 ounces water

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

3 tablespoons freshly grated horseradish

1/4 teaspoon ascorbic acid powder [*]

Salt and sugar to taste

For the dish:

Fresh horseradish, grated

Sliced kohlrabi

For the garnish:

Fresh bay leaves

Thyme sprigs

Chives

(*.) Available at most health food stores.

directions

For the brioche dumplings, place the veal bones in a medium bowl, Sprinkle with salt, and cover with cold water. Place in the refrigerator overnight. Strain, remove the marrow, and place in a medium bowl, discarding the bones. In a medium bowl, toss 101/2 ounces of brioche with the eggs and season. Place a sheet of plastic wrap on a flat work surface and place the marrow mixture onto the center and roll to enclose. Place in the freezer until firm, about two hours. Unwrap the dumpling dough, transfer to a meat grinder fitted with the medium die attachment, and grind into a large bowl. Change the attachment to the smallest die, grind the dumpling dough again, and set aside. In a medium saute pan, heat the butter over medium heat, add the remaining brioche cubes and saute until golden brown, about three minutes. Remove from the heat and place on a paper towel-lined sheet pan to drain. Transfer to the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade attachment and pulse until finely ground, about two minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, add the dumpling dough, and parsley, st ir well to combine, and season. Roll the mixture to form 18 1-ounce dumplings and set aside on a parchment-lined sheet pan.

For the beef shoulder, bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add the steak, veal bones, carrot, turnip, celeriac, juniper berries, allspice, and bay leaf. Partially cover the saucepan and simmer until tender, about five hours, stirring occasionally. Using metal tongs, transfer the steak to a sheet pan, and set aside keeping warm. Maintain the hot saucepan, add the thyme, baby carrots, and baby turnips, baby leeks, garlic, and simmer until tender, about five minutes. Remove from the heat and strain. Add the lovage and reserve the vegetables keeping warm. Remove the marrow from one of the bones, slice, and set aside keeping warm.

For the apple horseradish sauce, in a medium saucepan, bring the apple peels, cinnamon stick, clove, water, and sugar to a boil, reduce the beat, and simmer for five minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and discard the peels. In a medium bowl, combine 1/2 cup of cooking liquid, the grated apples, horseradish, and ascorbic acid, mix to combine. Season and set aside.

To finish the dumplings, in a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the chicken stock and beef stock to a simmer. Add the dumplings and simmer for 45 minutes or until done. Remove from the heat, strain, and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, spoon some vegetables onto the center of the plate and set some boiled beef on top. Arrange some brioche dumplings and bone marrow around the dish, sprinkle with apple horseradish sauce and kohlrabi, and garnish with bay leaves and thyme.

Weiner Schnitzel with Ligonberry Jam

david bouley

ingredients

For the cucumber salad:

1 cucumber, peeled seeds removed and sliced

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup sour cream

1/4 cup creme fratche

1 clove garlic peeled and mashed

1 teaspoon prepared horseradish

1/2 tablespoon champagne viregar

1/4 teaspoon ground caraway seeds

2 springs dill, stemmed and chopped

Salt and whit pepper to taste

For the radish salad

2 bunches radishes, tops removed and thinly sliced

1/4 cup sour cream

1/4 cup creme fraiche

Salt, pepper, and lemon juice to taste

For the potato salad:

2 1/2 pounds German butterball potatoes [*]

2 teaspoon caraway seeds.

1 tablespoon plus 2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 1/2 cups white beef stock

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/4 cup canola oil

1 1/2 tablespoons champagne vinegar

1 red onion peeled and diced

2 tablespoons chopped cornichons

1/4 cup green pumpkin seeds

Salt and white pepper to taste

For the Wiener Schnitzel:

2 cups all-purpose flour

6 eggs, beaten

1 day-old baguette, diced and finely ground

12 1 1/2-ounce veal medallions, pounded thin

Vegetable oil as needed

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

Salt and pepper to taste

For the dish:

Ligonberry jam

Lemon halves

For the garnish:

Ramp leaves

Fried parsley

Thyme sprigs

(*) Available through The Chef's Garden at (800) 289-4644.

directions

For the cucumber salad, in a medium bowl, combine the cucumber and salt and set aside for 30 minutes. Strain any excess water and set aside. In a medium bowl, combine the sour cream, creme fraiche, garlic, horseradish, vinegar caraway seeds, dill, and radishes and stir until well combined. Add the cucumber and mix to combine. Season and set aside keeping chilled.

For the radish salad, in a medium bowl, combine all of the ingredients and toss to combine. Season and set aside keeping chilled.

For the potato salad, in a medium saucepan,. cover the potatoes, caraway seeds, and one tablespoon of salt with water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender about 15 minutes. Remove the heat and strain through a fine meshsieve. Peel the potatoes slice thin, and set aside keeping warm. In a medium saucepan, bring the beef stock to a boil. Remove from the heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the mustard, sugar, canola oil, the remaining sal, and champagne vinegar and whisk to combine. Add to the potato salad and fold to combine. Add the red onion, cornichons, and pumpkins seeds and toss to combine. Season and set aside keeping warm.

For the Werner Schnitzet, preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Place the flour, eggs, and baguette crumbs in three separate bowls. In a medium, deep sauce pan heat enough oil to come 1/4-inch up two sides of the pan over medium heat. Season the veal, dredge, in flour, dip in the eggs, liberally snake the pan constantly. Add one tablespoon of butter and sear the veal on the other side. Remove from the heat, transfer the veal to a paper towel-lined sheet pan, and set aside keeping warm.

To serve arrange some veal in the center of the plate and garnish with ramp leaves fried parsley and thyme. Accompany with ligonberry jam, cucumber salad, potato salad, and radish salad.

Garlic and Ramp Soup with Miche Bread

david bouley

ingredients

For the soup:

4 ounces day-old miche bread, crust removed and diced

2 cups chicken stock plus 1 quart chicken stock

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

3 sprigs spring garlic, thinly sliced

2 shallots, peeled and thinly sliced

1/2 cup white wine

5 cloves garlic, blanched 3 times and boiled until tender

1/2 cup chopped chives

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and white pepper to taste

For the dish:

Chive oil

Garlic bread, sliced

For the garnish:

Ramp leaves

Note: Miche bread is a specialty of France, also known as a boule. Available through Bouley Bakery at 212-964-2525.

For the soup, in a medium bowl, combine the bread and two cups of chicken stock and set aside to soak for five minutes. In a large saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the spring garlic and shallots and saute until translucent. Add the wine and reduce until almost dry, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, remaining chicken stock, and bread mix and simmer until reduced by one-third, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat, transfer to a commercial blender, and puree until well combined, about one minute. With the motor running, add the chives and olive oil and puree until smooth and well combined. Strain through a fine mesh sieve, season, and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, spoon some soup into a bowl, drizzle with chive oil around the dish, and garnish with ramp leaves. Accompany with garlic bread.

Braised Suckling Pig with Miche Bread and Golden Raisins

david bouley

ingredietion

For the stuffing:

Zest of 1 orange, blanched three times

1 cup simple syrup

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

5 ounces day-old miche bread, crust removed, dried overnight and finely ground

1/2 teaspoon juniper berries, ground

For the suckling pig:

1 cup Armagnae

1 cup golden raisins

5 ounces suckling pig belly meat

2 ounces suckling pie belly lat

2 shallots, peeled and chopped

Reserved breadcrumb mixture

1/2 cup chopped parsley

4 boneless suckling pig legs, skin on

4 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 cup sliced button mushrooms

2 carrots, peeled and diced

2 onions peeled and diced

1 leek, trimmed and diced

2 cup madeira

1 gallon brown veal stock

1 cup golder raisin

Salt and peper to taste

For the cabbage:

1 table poor garlid oil

3 cups sliced Savoy cabbage blanched

Salt and pepper to taste

For the asparagus:

1 tablespoon garlic oil

1 bunch white asparagus, thinly sliced

Salt, pepper, and sherry vinegar to taste

For the dish:

Orange Zest

Crushed juniper berries

Note: Miche bread is a specialty of France, also known as a boule: Available through Bouley Bakery at 212-964-2525

directions

For the stuffing, in a medium saucepan

Over medium heat bring the orang zest and simple sytrup to simmer and maintain the heat until tender about minutes. Remoye from the heat strm and place the zest on a silpace lined sheet panto dry overnight place the zest in a pice grinde grind until powedered and set aside one teaspoon for to garnish. In a medium saute pan melt the butter over medium heat until golden brown, about two minute. Add the breadcrumbs and saute until golden brown about four minutes. Remove from the heat and pass through a fine mesh sieve. Add the orang power and juniper berries, toss to combine and set aside.

For the suckling pig, in a small bowl, combine the Armagnac and raisins and set aside. In a meat grinder fitted with the medium die attachment, grind the pork belly meat with one ounce of pork belly fat and set aside. In a medium saute pan, heat the remaining fat over medium heat. Add the shallots, stuffing, and parsley and saute until translucent, about two minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Add to the ground pork, toss to combine, and season. Fill each pig leg with the stuffing, secure with butcher's twine, and set aside. In a large, deep saute pan, melt the butter over medium heat. Add the pig legs and sear on all sides, about four minutes. Using metal tongs, transfer the pig legs to a sheet pan and maintain the hot pan. Add the mushrooms, carrots, onions, and saute until tender, about three minutes. Add the Madeira and simmer until reduced by half. Add the veal stock and pig legs and bring to a simmer, maintain the heat for two hours, skimming occasionally, Remove from the heat, using metal tongs, transfer the legs on a cutting board, slice in half, cut half into thin slices, and set aside keeping warm. Strain the liquid through a fine mesh sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Add the raisins, season, and set aside keeping warm.

For the cabbage in a medium saute pan heat the oil over medium heat. Add the cabbage and saute antil tender about two minutes. Remove from the heat season and set aside keeping warm.

For the asparagus in a medium saute pan heat the oil over medium heat. Add the asparagus and saute until tender about tour minutes. Remove from the heat season and set aside keeping warm.

To serve, place some sliced pig's leg in the center of the plate, spoon some sauce and pork sauce over the dish and sprinkle some orange zest and juniper berries around the dish.

Crisp Croissants with Almond Cream

david bouley

ingredients

For the syrup:

1 quart water

17 1/2 ounces granulated sugar

Zest of 1 orange

1 cinnamon stick, crushed

1 vanilla bean, split and scraped

For the cream:

3 1/2 ounces unsalted butter

4 1/4 ounces granulated sugar

2 1/2 ounces blanched almond flour

2 1/2 ounces unblanched almond flour

3 eggs

For the croissants:

6 day-old croissants, halved

1 cup sliced blanched almonds

For the garnish:

Confectioners' sugar

directions

For the syrup, in a medium saucepan, bring all of the ingredients to a boil. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.

For the cream, in a small saucepan, bring the butter to a boil. Remove from the heat and transfer to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the sugar and mix to combine. Add the almond Hours in several stages, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition. Add the eggs and mix to combine. Transfer to a pastry bag fitted with a medium round tip and set aside.

For the croissants, preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, toss the croissant halves with syrup to coat. Using metal tongs, transfer the croissants to a wire rack, allowing the excess syrup to drip off. Place half the croissants on a parchment-lined sheet pan and pipe some almond cream in the center and top each with a remaining croissant. Sprinkle with the almonds, and place in the oven to bake until crisp, about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

To serve, arrange some croissants in a basket and garnish with the confectioners' sugar.

Lemon Bread Pudding

david bouley

For the breadpudding

10 1/2 ounces granuated sugar

6 eggs

Zest and juice of 4 lemons

1 quart buttermilk

6 cups dicediday-old baguette crust removed

For the garnish:

Lemon zest

directions

For the bread pudding preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl combine the sugar and eggs and whisk until thick and lemon colored. Add the lemon juice, lemon zest, and buttermilk and whisk to combine. Add the bread, toss to coat, and set aside for one hour. Transfer to an ovenproof baking dish. Place in a roasting pan and pour enough hot water into the pan to come halfway up the sides of the dish. Cover with aluminum foil and place in the oven to bake for 45 minutes. Uncover and bake for an additional 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool. Cut to squares and set aside.

To set place some bread pudding in a bowl and garnish with lemon zest.
COPYRIGHT 2001 Culinaire, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:stale bread as an ingredient
Publication:Art Culinaire
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Sep 22, 2001
Words:9867
Previous Article:Oil as an ingredient.
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