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The Long-Term Effects and Cost-Effectiveness of Success for All.

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This report presents results from an analysis of the long-term benefits and costs of Success for All (SFA), a school reform program that focuses on promoting early reading success among educationally at-risk students. The program was piloted and implemented in Baltimore elementary schools. This analysis tracks the educational outcomes through eighth grade for the original SFA students and for a quasi-experimental, untreated control group of students from matched comparison schools. The study also examines differential costs associated with SFA and control students' schooling through eighth grade. Finally, it compares the relative cost-effectiveness of SFA and three other initiatives (Perry Preschool, the Abecedarian Project, and the Tennessee class-size experiment). Data on the 1986-87 through 1998-99 school years were collected from computerized files provided by the Baltimore City Public School System. Results indicated that relative to controls, SFA students completed eighth grade at a younger age, at the same educational expense, and with better achievement outcomes, fewer special education placements, and less frequent retentions. Comparison to the other interventions suggests that SFA provides the strongest educational benefits for the dollar, though no single program may be relied upon as the "great equalizer." (Contains 45 references.) (SM)

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Author:Borman, Geoffrey D.; Hewes, Gina M.
Publication:ERIC: Reports
Date:Oct 1, 2001
Words:266
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